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Welcome Day for Students 
on Sunday opens Fall semester 

See Page 2 

Welcome! 

From Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College president 



^ACC A.RCHIVES 



Welcome to Fall 1985 at The WiUiamsport Area Community College. 
The 1985 year has been one of great significance for your Community Col- 
lege. We celebrated our 20th anniversary, formed a new sponsorship ar- 
rangement with the City of WiUiamsport, and broke ground for a new 
campus building that could change the future of our College and our com- 
munity. 

The City of WiUiamsport expressed ^eat faith in the College by offer- 
ing itself as sponsor at a very crucial time. However, city sponsorship 
leaves us with a greatly reduced sponsorship base. Former school district 
sponsors have agreed to support their residents who are returning students 
through January 1987. But, the challenge remains to reduce costs to new 
students who are no longer sponsored. Some funding received through the 
state's new variable stipend funding legislation wUl be used to reduce tui- 
tion costs to these new students. And, the Financial Aid Office continues 
to find the means of making a WiUiamsport Area Community CoUege 
more affordable for all its students. 

We also remain optimistic that, in the future, local govemmg bodies 



will enter into voluntary arrangements with the College to lessen the 
burden of tuition costs on their residents. Such anangements not only wiU 
benefit the students, but their communities as weU. Educated and skilled 
people are a tremendous asset to any community. 

Another tremendous asset - to the CoUege and the community - is 
presently under construction at the southern end of the main campus. 
Work began on the 153,000 square foot Advanced Technology and Health 
Science Center following groundbreaking ceremonies in June. The new 
center wUl enable us to offer such high technology programs as fiber op- 
tics, laser technology, automated manufacturing, computer maintenance 
and repair, and telecommunications. Comprehensive two-year training 
programs of this caliber are not offered at any other faciUty in the eastern 
United States. 

The future looks brighter every day here at The WiUiamsport Area 
Community College. As we enter our 21st year as a community college, we 
are strengthened by a rekindled pride in our heritage and a new desire to be 
the very best we can be ~ for our students and for our community. 




POTLKjHT 



SuniUy/Mondiy, Aa|. 25/2<, 198& • Vol. 11, No. 1 • 12 Pi|cs 
WOHuiiiport Am Commniiit} CoUtft • WUIiamiport, Pi. 17TU 

City becomes College's sponsor 

See Story, Page 7 

Construction begun on 'building of the future' 

See Story, Page 7 



■ ^.-^ijnrm^ 




Summer! 

Ah, those la^ days of 
summer... At right, Michael 
S. Stine, of WiUiamsport, 
was captured on film by 
Timothy A. Neidig, graphic 
arts student from 
WiUiamsport. 

At 1^, taking the writ- 
ten part of a motorcycle ex- 
am is Janet Kepner, of 
Cogan Station. See Cycle 
Story, Page 5 




2DSPOTUGHTDSgaiU;/Mo«lir. Ai|. 15IU, IflS 



Welcome Day for Students on Sunday opens Fall semester 



A Welcome Day for Students on Sunday, Aug. 25, marked the beginning of 
the new Fail semester - the first under a new city sponsorship - at the College. 

The special "get acquainted or get reacquainted" day was to begin at 2 
p.m. and extend to 7 p.m. 

The Welcome Day for Studeattivas devised to replace the formerly-used 
orientation day. 

According to Dr. William J. Martin, dean of student services, the special 
day is "to provide students with the opportunity to accomplish some needed 
campus business before the lines get too long as well as to give the new students 
a chance to get acquainted with one another and with the College." 
Fociu OB lervicti lod icUvitiet 

The focus during the day is to be on services and social activities for 

Goide for Welcome Day 

Excerpts from information supplied by Dr. William J. Martin and the 
Orientation Committee are provided here by The SPOTLIGHT as a guide for 
Welcome Day. 

This Special Edition of The SPOTLIGHT, the student newspaper at The 
Williamsport Area Community College, is distributed both on Sunday, in 
recognition of Welcome Day, and on Monday, the first day of classes for the 
Fall semester. 



SPOTLIGHT -- The student newspaper will accept applications for staff 
membership, answer questions about making contributions of writing or photos, 
and distribute copies of the year's first edition. Lifelong Education Center foyer. 
Advisement Center -- Open and staffed to provide students with whatever 
assistance is needed. In addition, staff will have lest results from the Aug. 24 
testing session to distribute to students who attend. Learning Resources Center, 
near Library. 

The Library ~ Open for browsing and staffed to assist students. Learning 
Resources Center. 

Media Center - Staff will telecast on continuous runs a videotape which 
reviews the College. The showings will be in the Susquehanna Room. 

Bookstore - Open for business including purchases of books and supplies. 
Learning Resources Center. 

College Activities - Staffing an information and sign-up table in the 
Lifelong Education Center hallway. {College Activities Office arranged for the 
feature film.) 

Recreation Center - Open to distribute identification cards; game room 
also open. Lifelong Education Center. 

Admissions Office -- Staff will answer students' questions and will have 
housing information at a nearby location. Lifelong Education Center foyer. 

Financial Aid Office -- Staff will assist students with any difficulties in 
financial aid. Learning Resources Center foyer. 

Developmental Studies - Staff available to answer questions from students 
and to provide tours of the Tutoring Center. Learning Resources Center foyer. 
Auto Registration/Security - The Security Office will register student 
vehicles at a desk in the Learning Resources Center foyer. 

Susquehanna Room - Providing the picnic lunch which is free to students; 
staff will have a booth in the Susquehanna Room to register students for the 
meal plan. 

WW AS -- WWAS-88FM, student-operated radio station, will have a table 
to accept applications for staff. Lifelong Education Center foyer. 

Academic Divisions ~ Each academic division will have representatives at 
tables in the Susquehanna Room. These staff members will meet new students, 
answer questions, meet with parents and offer general assistance associated with 
the beginning of the semester. Susquehanna Room, Lifelong Education Center. 
ROTC - A representative will be stationed in the Learning Resources 
Center foyer. 

Commonwealth Bank and Trust Co. ~ A representative will be stationed in 
the Learning Resources Center foyer. 



Susquehanna Room 
is hub of activities 
for Welcome Day 



The SusqaehuBi Room is 
the LJleloig EdacitioD Ceiler U 
the hib of ictivitiea Kkedalcd for 
Wekomc Diy for Stadents on 
SiBday. 

Most of Ike eveats sdiedDled 
are to be Ib the UfeloBg Edaci- 
doB Cealer - except for i (eatnre 
film, which will be sbowB ia (he 
Acadeaiic Cealer Aaditoriam. 



students. The day is to include a picnic lunch for all students at no cost to them. 

In addition, a feature movie, Police Academy II, is scheduled for the even- 
ing. The movie will be shown at 7 p.m. in the Academic Center Auditorium - 
where, students were advised, seating is limited. 
Whil caa be doae 

Students will have the opportunity to take care of arranging for campus 
parking, obtaining or validating an identification card, purchasing books and 
supplies, and making arrangements for local banking. 

Campus offices which will have representatives on hand to answer questions 
include: Admissions, Advisement and Career Services, Financial Aid, Housing, 
Program Faculty, Developmental Studies, College Library, and Student Ac- 
tivities. 

Where's my division office? 

By the way, WHAT'S a division office? 

Old-timers around campus toss around the term, division office, pretty 
recklessly. . . What, a newcomer might ask, is a division office? [A nd even if he 
or she doesn't, we're about to tell 'em./ 

In the organizational structure of the College, the division office is a focal 
point - a point of administration between students and faculty and higher level 
administration. It is here that a variety of administrative matters, including but 
not limited to credit overioads and first-level counseling referrals, is handled. 

One important piece of information a new student may glean from his or 
her division office - if he or she doesn't already know it ~ is the name of his or 
her faculty adviser. The adviser plays an important role in scheduling and other 
matters; students are urged to know their faculty advisers by College staff. 

In the listing below, search for the appropriate program title or abbrevia- 
tion and back-read to determine the name and location of the division office. 

Business and Computer Technologies Division, Dr. Donald B. Bergerstock, 
director, office located in Room 310, Academic Center. 

Programs included are Accounting (BA), Business Management (BM), 
Clerical Studies (BT), Computer Information Systems (CS), Computer Operator 
(CO), Retail Management (RM), Secretarial Office Administration (SA), (Ex- 
ecutive, Legal, Medical), Word Processing (WP). 

Construction Technology Division, Dr. Ralph Home, director, office 
located in Room 116, Building Trades Center. 

Programs included are Air Condition/Refrigeration(RA/RC), Architectural 
Technology (AT), Building Construction Technology (CB), Construction 
Carpentry (CC), Electrical Occupations (EO), Electrical Technology (EL), 
Plumbing and Heating (PL). 

Health Sciences Division, Davie Jane Nestarick, director, office located in 
Room 209, Academic Center. 

Programs included are Dental Hygiene (DH), Dietetic Technician (DT) 
Food & Hospitality Management (FH), Practical Nursing (NU), Quantity Food 
Production & Service (QF), Radiography (RT), Surgical Technology (ST). Ser- 
vice Courses are Medical Terminology and Fitness and Lifetime Sports. 

Industrial Technology Division, Dr. George A. Baker, director, office 
located in Room 100, Metal Trades Center. 

Programs included are Civil Engineering Technology (CT), Electronics 
Technology (El), Engineering Drafting Technology (ED), Industrial Drafting 

■■■ Please turn lo Page 3 



SPOTLIOHT 

Sunday/Monday, Aug. 25/2«, 1984 - Vol. 21, No. 1 

Spoclal Edition lor Wolcorm Day 

and FIrsi Day of Claaaaa 

Ttle SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning o( Itie academic year ex- 
P.!!f, Colleae vacations, by loumalism and other Interested students ol'The 
WIHIamsport Area Community College. 

,-,-,^^% i"?"" '■ *'=«^«™te Center, 1006 W, Third St.. WIHIamsport Pa 
17701. Telephone: (717)326-3761. Extension 221. 



Opinions expressed are those ol ttie student newspaper or of thoee whose 
names accompany Items. Opinions do not reflect official opinion of the Institution. 

Tfte SPOTLIGHT Is a member of 
Ihe Columbia Scholastic Press Assoclallorj 

THE STAFF 

reauiL'^nTSi!«\fl"Tu ^y^"'^'''"'"^" "> the College previous to the date 
u»*lt« ^ o included. Wanna F Brown, Kathleen L. Elswert, Cynthia E A 
S!^^^;*®,''^.'' J^'"^'"""' ^""'^ ^- Musgrave, Timothy F Neidlg. Judim L 
Swinehart. Lyie A Wagner, LeRoy S Whitmire Jr u. ..uu..., u. 

Faculty adviser: Anthony N. Cillo. 



SPOTLIGHTOSaidtjr/Monli;, Ad|. 25/26, 19SSd3 



Student Government 
Association 
meets Tuesday, 
all students 
invited to attend 



The Student Government Association will meet Tuesday, Aug. 27, at 4 
p.m. in Room B107 of the Lifelong Education Center, according to Mrs. JoAnn 
R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

The meeting location is across the foyer from the Susquehanna Room. 

Returning senators, prospective senators, and interested students will have a 
chance to get acquainted at this meeting, Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

A review of the 1984-1985 academic year will be presented and questions 
will b« answered, she noted. 

The Student Government Association, Mrs. Fremiotti said, "welcomes all 
students to stop by. SGA could use volunteers for various activities such as 
Bloodmobile, dances, as well as for other events." 



Identification card processing begins today in Rec Center 



Fee imposed after first 10 days 

Identification card (ID) and ID card validation processing will be done in 
the Recreation Center Office, Room A137, Lifelong Education Center to- 
day through Monday, Sept. 9, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

Hours for the processing are Mondays through Thursdays, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

After the initial 10-day period, there will be a $10 processing fee, she said. 
Bring schedule to speed up process 

Both full-time and part-time students are encouraged, Mrs. Fremiotti said, 
to bring their schedules with them to speed up the process. 

Returning students can bring their ID cards and schedules to the Recreation 
Center Office to get their card revalidated. 

She commented that students are being reminded that ID cards are needed 
to use the facilities on campus, for the meal plan and for a municipal bus pass 
(which is issued only to ftill-time students). She added that while part-time 
students do not receive the reduced city bus rate, they do need the ID for campus 
facilities and activities. 
Fee, different boors effective Sept. 10 

Starting Tuesday, Sept. 10, IDs will be processed for $10. Photographs will 
be taken on Mondays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from S p.m. to 7 p.m., or by 
appointment in the Recreation Center Office. 

Where's my division office? 

By the way, WHAT'S a division office? 

■■■ Continued from Page 2 

(ID), Machine Tool Technology (TT), Machinist General (MG), Tool Design 

Technology (TD), Welding (WE). 

Integrated Studies Division, Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, director. Office is located 
in Room 211, Academic Center. 

Programs included are Advertising Art (AR), Broadcasting (BR), Graphic 
Arts (GA), Human Services (HS), Journalism (JO), Mathematical Computer 
Science (MC), Printing (GP), Technical Illustration (TI), Technology Studies 

crs). 

General Studies (GS) and Individual Studies (IS) students are included in 
this division. 

Natural Resources Management Division, Dr. Wayne Longbrake, director. 
Office located in Room 123, Earth Science Center. 

Programs included are Agribusiness (AG), Dairy Herd Management (DY), 
Floriculture (FL), Forest Technology (FR), Nursery Management (NM), Out- 
door Power Equipment (SM), Service and Operation of Heavy Construction 
Equipment (SO), Wood Products Technology (WD). 

Transportation Technology Division, T. Donald Kuhns, director. Office 
located in Room 161, Learning Resources Center. 

Programs included are Auto Body Repair (AB), Automotive Mechanics 
(AM), Automotive Technology (AU), Aviation Maintenance Technician (AC), 
Aviation Technology (AD), EHesel Mechanics (DM), Diesel Technology (DD). 

Secondary Vocational Programs, Dr. Edward M. Geer, director. Office is 
located in Technical Trades Center. 

Programs included are Auto Body Repair, Automotive Mechanics, Avia- 
tion Maintenance Technician, Carpentry, Cooperative Education 
(CAPSTONE), Cosmetology, Drafting-Architectural/Mechanical, Electrical 
Construction, Forestry, Health Assistant, Horticulture, Machine Shop, Quanti- 
ty Food Production and Service, Small Engine Repair, Welding. 



r 

V 




^.HN 





GETTING ID CARD is Kenneth L. Manson, left, tool technology stodeot 
from Emporium. Taking the ID picture is Ken R. Fugagli, tool technology and 
work study student from Rocky Grove. [SPOTLIGHT photo by Wanna F. 
Brown] 

Susquehanna Room 
lists hours, 
details menus 
for the week 

The Susquehanna Room in the 
Lifelong Education Center has posted 
its hours. 

They are: Monday through Thurs- 
day, 7 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Friday, 7 
a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sun- 
day, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Additionally, the staff noted that 
the Sandwich Bar is open Mondays 
through Fridays from 11 a.m. until 2 
p.m. The Sandwich Bar will serve cold 
sandwiches and hoagies only and is 
designed to be used by those in need of 
a quick lunch, the Susquehanna Room 
report noted. 
Menus listed 

ISpoce limitations prevented listing the 
week's menus: in the next issue, the 
weekly menu array will be published.J 

Monday 
Lunch: Salisbury Sleak, gravy, potatoes and 
vegetable, $2.39; Shrimp Quiche, small salad 
bar, $2.99 

Soup; Com Chowder, Beef Noodle. 
Dinner; Roast Beef, gravy, potatoes, and 
vegetable, $2.89; Spaghetti and meatballs, 

■■■ Please turn to Page II 



You haven't had a Hoagie 

ur)til you've had a 

HOBY 

HOBY'S HOAGIES 
and PIZZA 

508 Fifth Avenue 
322-5455 

I 20% OFF I 

|ALLSANDWICHES| 

I Ad/Coupon ■ 

Valid Until Sept 30. 1985 I 

Fr*« Daltvary 

Ltmltad ArM 

Minimum Order S4.00 



4aSP(mJGHTa$udi;/MoDibT, Aig. ISIli. IMS 




Summer in Review: K. Park Williams, 
production printer, was one of staff at 
work during the summer in the Col- 
lege's Duplicating and Mall Services 
Department - which his responsibility 
for printing College materials. 



Work Study? 
Ya' Gotta' 
Be There! 

There will be a MANDATORY 
meeting for the students who 
were offered and accepted Col- 
lege Work Study for the 
ms-im academic year. 

II will be held in the Academic 

Center Aaditorium tomorrow, 

Monday, Aug. 26, from 3:30 to 

4:30 p.m. 

Important forms will be 
distributed and a briefing will be 
given. Class excuses will be pro- 
vided for those who have a class 
eoi\fUct. 

-This announcement provided by 
The Financial Aid Office 



Parking, parking: Security officer 
tells where, urges registration 



Students planning to use CoUege 
parking lots must have llieir vehicles 
registered with the Security Office, ac- 
cording to Cecil C. Cryder, chief of 
security. 

Students may register vehicles and 
pick up parking stickers during 
Sunday's Welcome Day and from 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m this Monday through Fri- 
day at the Security OfTice in the General 
Services Building at the foot of Park 
Street. 
Stickers free 

"The parking stickers are free," 
Cryder said, "and to avoid parking 
fines, it's to the student's advantage to 
obtain them." 

For student convenience, Cryder 
said, a map of student parking areas has 
been established. Black areas on the 
map designate student parking. [The 
SPOTLIGHT has transferred informa- 
tion from a map provided by the 
Security Office to the map which the 
newspaper is using for general irfforma- 
lion. Thai map appears on the bacic 
page of this edition./ 

Noting that specific parking areas 
have been reserved for the handicapped, 
the security officer said stickers for 
those areas may also be obtained in the 
Security Office. 

He commented, "Once a vehicle 
has a student sticker, it cannot be park- 
ed in the visitor parking areas." 
Fines outlined 

According to Cryder, fines will be 
imposed to students and College faculty 
and staff who do not abide by the Col- 
lege parking regulations. The fines, set 
by the College Board of Trustees, are: 
No identification sticker, $25; 
unauthorized parking in handicapped 
area, $25; blocking vehicles, $10; park- 
ing in a restricted zone or lot, $5; park- 
ing in a driveway, $5; unauthorized 
parking in a visitor area, $5; 
unauthorized parking in a faculty lot, 
$5, and obstructing snow removal, $10. 
Cryder added, "If the fines are not 
paid within 10 days, the fines are doubl- 
ed every 20 days from the issue date." 



BENSON 



tflfil mini, 
f^m market 



Corner of 3rcl and Maynard Sts. 

FREE! 49« DRINK 
With This Ad [Coupon] :\?\ 

vtiy; When Presented at AM-PM ):,J 

otter Expires Sur). 9/1/85 "^^ 

ALWAYS OPEN - ALL NIGHT, HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



"The fines," he continued, "do 
exist. If students ignore or refiise to pay 
them, grades will be withheld." 

About bicycle parking 

Addressing students who plan to 
park bicycles on campus, Cryder said 
the bikes must be parked in bike racks 
provided by the College. 

"Bikes should not be chained or 
affixed to trees, shrubbery, posts, or in- 
side the College buildings," he said and 
added that penalties include fines or im- 
poundment. 

Lost and found; precautions 

On another note, students, the of- 
ficer said, should check with the Securi- 
ty Office for articles lost. "Owners of 
lost articles should make inquiry or 
periodic checks with the Security 
Office," he said, "because the majority 
of things lost eventually lands here." 



This Tuesday 
is Hiawatha cruise 
deadline 

This Tuesday, Aug. 27, is the 
deadline for College employees to make 
reservations for a Susquehanna River 
cruise aboard the paddleboat Hiawatha. 

The cruise will be from 5:30 to 7:30 
p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 10. 

Those taking part in the cruise pay 
their own costs. Payment is being re- 
quested with the reservation. 

Additional information is available 
from Mrs. Virginia M. Missigman at 
College Ext. 279 or from Mrs. Nancy J. 
Schick at College Ext. 487. 



Save Water! 
Check leaky 
faucets...! 



Ice Cream Festival 

Thursday, Aug. 29 
1 P.M. 'til ? 

in the 
ACADEMIC CENTER LOBBY 

ONLY 25' a Dip 




Sponsored by... 

Student Government 

Association 

(SGA) 



■fe**<»*!""WsH5i'isaSsissi 



SPOTUGHTaSiidjj/MoiiUf, Aa|. lilU, IMSOS 



Motorcycle Rider Safety Course now being given: free 



Motorcycle Rider Safety Courses 
will be held at the Natural Resource 
Management Campus in Allenwood to- 
day through the month of October, ac- 
cording to Grant L. Martin, coor- 
dinator of Service Agency and Certifi- 
cation Programs. 

The 17-hour course consists of 10 
hours of motorcyle training and seven 
hours of classroom instruction. The 
classes are held in the parking lot and in 
Room 107 at the Center. 
Free lo Pennsylvgoia residents 

The course is free to Pennsylvania 
residents. There is a $50 registration fee 
to all out-of-state students. However, a 
vahd Pennsylvania class five license is 
required to take the course or proof that 
the license was applied for. Applica- 
tions can be picked up in the Center for 
Lifelong Education (CLE), Room 206 
of the Academic Center. When the 
course is completed successfully, the 
motorcycle permit will be updated to a 
vahd Pennsylvania motorcycle license. 
Coorse is cooperative effort 

The course is offered by the Center 
for Lifelong Education but it is run out 
of the Indiana University of Penn- 
sylvania (lUP), according to Martin. 
He also noted, "the course is run in 
cooperation with lUP and the Penn- 
sylvania Department of Transportation 
(PennDOT). 

The College was contacted by Al 
Jensen, regional coordinator, and 
Wilham Seward, site coordinator, in 
March to determine if another course 
could be started in this region. Seward 
noted that there are three regions: West, 
east, and central ~ which is the region 
including this area and the region for 
which he is site coordinator. 

Martin schedules the courses. He 
said he wanted to stress that registra- 
tions are accepted on a first-come, first- 
served basis but all students must sign- 



up a week in advance. 




SPOTLIGHT Photos 
By Winni F. Brown 

Photos taken Summer 'SI 



SHOWING proper lechniqnes with 
help of slide projector is Dave 
Wheelind, motorcycle instraclor from 
Elimsport. 



Encourages experienced riden, too 

Martin also added that he wanted 
to encourage experienced riders as well 
as novice riders to take "the course 
because the course has a lot of collision 
avoidance techniques that they haven't 
mastered." 

"The College felt this program 
would be an excellent opportunity for 
cycle enthusiasts to sharpen skills and 
for novices to learn cycle riding techni- 
ques from the ground up," Martin said. 

The reason the course is offered 
free of charge is that when one applies 
for the Hcense the extra two dollars on 
the price is put toward the Motorcycle 
Safety Program, said Seward. 

The motorcycle course was held at 
the Williamsport Area High School 
Auditorium parking lot from June 10 
through Aug. 9, according to Seward. 
"Over 100 people went through the 
course," he noted. 

Seward said, "The Williamsport 
Area High School let us use the projec- 
tor and other equipment, a classroom 
and storage jbr the motorcycles at no 
charge to us or the program - and we 
really appreciated that fact." 
Dealen supply motorcycles 

The 12 motorcycles used in the 
course were supplied rent-free by Bob 
Logue Motor Sports, Honda dealer 
from Williamsport, and Ye Olde Cycle 
Bam, Susuki dealer from Hughesville, 
Seward said. 

There are five instructors in the 
Lycoming County area. They are Bill 
Castle, George Cook, John Guild, Keith 
McKenrick, Dave Wheeland, and 
WiUiam Seward (as a "fill-in"). 

To become an instructor, one must 
first be an experienced motorcyclist, 
must have a clean driving record, must 
be 20 years old or older, must be in 
good physical condition and must pay 
$100 to take an instructor's course ~ 
among other requirements. 

Additional information about the 
courses and dates they are ofi'ered are 
available by contacting the Motorcycle 
Safety Education Office at (717) 
327-4775 or by calling Grant Martin at 
CoUege Ext. 775. 

Bookstore hours 
and late arrival list 
posted at the store 

Special hours for the start of the 
semester are detailed in an announce- 
ment on the Bookstore door. 

A list of books which are not cur- 
rently available will also be maintained 
there. The list will be updated as 
changes occur. 

The Bookstore was scheduled to be 
open Sunday, Aug. 25, for business in 
keeping with the College's Welcome 
Day for Students. 




EXPLAINING the push-right, go-right procedure is Williim Seward. Listen- 
ing are, from left, Twila Charles, of Muncy; Henry Shaffer, of South 
Williamsport; Janet Kepner, of Cogan Station; Tom Manzilti, of 
WiUiunsport, and Dean Kepner of Cogan Station. 




GETTING FURTHER comment from the students are, from left, William 
Seward, site coordinator and fdl-in motorcycle instructor, and Mark A. Cor- 
mier, business management student from Williamsport and Phi Beta Lambda 
vice president. 



BARRY'S 




Open 6 a.m. lo midnight 
Monday thru Saturday 



Brooklyn Style Eatery jj 



PHONE 
323FOOD 



•A UNIQUE EATING EXPERIENCE 
•BEST BREAKFAST IN TOWN 
•ARCADE AND POOL TABLE 
•DAILY SPECLU>S 

234 Park St. Just across from 
the new east parking lot 



i 



6asKmJCHTasnJiT/Mwid«T. An. isiu, ins 




SPOTLIGHT 

Photos 

By 

Wanna F. Brown 



GOING, GOING... And now it's gone. The building which most recently 
housed adniinislnitiTe offices on the swond floor and various programs on the 
first floor - Tarionsly known as "the old trolley bam", "Unit 6" and "the 
Administration Building" - is gone. Demolition, pictured above and at right 
in various stages, was completed during the summer. The land on which it was 
situated will, for now, be used partly for parking and partly as a "green area". 
ISPOTLIGHT photos by Wanna F. Brownj 



'm' 



Dental Hygiene Clinic to open 
Tuesday, Sept. 3; prices given 



The Denial Hygiene Clinic ~will 
reopen for the Fall semester on Tues- 
day, Sept. 3. Services will be offered on 
the following days: 

Tuesdays and Wednesdays, from 8 
a.m. lo noon, and from 4:30 p.m. to 
8;30 p.m. 

Thursdays, from noon to 4 p.m. 

Fridays, from 8 a.m. to noon. 

The charge for prophylaxis (clean- 
ing) is $4 to College employees and $8 
for the general public. 

The cost for a child will be $5 for a 
cleaning and $2 for a flouride applica- 
tion. 

The charge for x-rays is as follows: 
Full mouth series, $10; bite-wing, $4; 

FHMSO to meet 
this Thursday 

The Food and Hospitality •- 
Management Student Organiza- 
tion will meet at noon this Thurs- 
day in Room 132B, Lifelong 
Education Center, according to 
Mrs. Vivian P. Moon, faculty ad- 
viser. 

5 The organization and the 

meeting are open to all dietetic 
technician and all food and 
hospitality management students, 
she said. 

To be discussed at the 
meeting are catering events and 

I educational tours. 

"All DT and FH students 

■ will want to learn how they can 

\ benefit by getting involved," Mrs. 
Moon said. 



paoelipse, $10; individual films, $1 
each. 

Appointments may be made by 
telephoning Mrs. Mary Facey at College 
Ext. 407. 

Gym closed 
this weekend; 
reopens Sept. 3 

Regular hoars listed 
for weight room, open gym 

The Bardo Gymnasium will be 
closed at 3:30 p.m. this Friday, Aug. 30 
(Labor Day weekend) but will be 
reopened Tuesday, Sept. 3, at 4 p.m. 

The weight room and open gym 
regular hours will be from 4 to 10 p.m. 
Mondays through Thursdays and from 
6 to 10 p.m. Sundays, according to 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of College activities. 

"Students need their validated IDs 
to enter the gymnasium as well as clean 
gym shoes and proper attire," she said. 

She also noted that "students don't 
need to bring their own equipment; 
equipment will be provided at the 
gym." 



Coming... 

in the next issue: 

• •• 

The Indian Park 

Project 



Students begin WWAS-FM 'air-shifts' 
in September; staff applicants invited 



Starting lo September, students will 
operate air-shifls on WWAS-FM, the 
College's student-operated radio sta- 
tion, according to Ms. Janie M. Swartz, 
adviser. 

She also reported that a call for 
staff applications is being made. lAn 
application blank is published 
elsewhere in today's SPOTLIGHT./ 
Ms. Swartz pointed out, "WWAS- 
88FM provides an opportunity for 
students majoring in broadcast/mass 
communication to learn and practice 
their skills - but enrollment in this pro- 



Save Water! 
Check leaky 
faucets...! 



gram is not required for students who 
would like to participate in the opera- 
tion of the station." 

When the station resumes opera- 
tion, featured will be a variety of music 
programs including Top 40, blues, jazz, 
reggae, bluegrass, classical, bard rock, 
new wave, fold, and international 
music, the adivser said. 

"Other programs will include those 
such as live drama, 'hot' topics, panel 
talk shows, campus tips, comedy, and a 
chance to create your own format," she 
added. 

Campus, local, state, and interna- 
tional news and sports will be broadcast 
with students researching, writing, and 
using the United Press International ser- 
vice. 

Ms. Swartz, who joined the College 
faculty last year as an English/mass 
communication instructor, succeeds 
Mrs. Linda R. Winiarczyk who now is 
principally involved in a business 
operated by her and her husband. 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

CORNER OF 2nd & MAYNARD 

PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

Hours: Mon.-Sal. II a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Sun. 

Monday Regular Sub Whole $1.60 

Tuesday Meatball Whole $1.75 

Wednesday Turkey Whole $1.40 

Thursday Ham Whole $1.80 

Friday Tuna Whole $1.70 

Saturday Cheese Steak Whole $2.50 



Daily Specials 



SPOTUGHTDSoidtT/MoidiT, Aij. 25/M, IWSD i 



Professional Development Center 
'lookin* good': students at work 




WORK PROGRESSES on the Professional Development Center on Sus- 
quehanna Street. The building, designed and being constructed by students of 
the College, is shown above as it appears to the observer who "walks around" 
and at right as it appears from Susquehanna Street. [SPOTLIGHT photos by 
Wanna F. Brown/ 



City becomes College's sponsor 
Construction begun on 'building of the future' 



Courtesy College Information Office 
With a July 1 deadline just days away, the City of Williamsport this sum- 
mer became sponsor of The Williamsport Area Community College. The spon- 
sorship pact was approved by the state shortly thereafter. 



Earlier, on June 3, ground was brolcen lor the College's new facility, the 
152,000-square-foot Advanced Technology and Health Sciences Center - which 
some are calling "the building of the future" both because of its design and 
because of the educational facilities it will contain. 



Sponsorship agreement reached 'Definitely bigger than a breadbox' 



At the end of the Spring semester, 
the College faced a possible July 1 clos- 
ing if no solution could be found for the 
sponsorship dilemma. The 20 sponsor- 
ing school districts were trying to find a 
way out of the sponsorship agreement. 
The effort to have Lycoming County 
become the official sponsor was rejected 
by the county commissioners. 

But, with only days to go to the Ju- 
ly 1 deadline, the City of Williamsport, 
under the leadership of Mayor Steven J. 
Lucasi, came forward with an offer of 
city sponsorship. That offer was ac- 
cepted by the College Board of 
Trustees. 

The Pennsylvania Department of 
Education approved the new sponsor- 
ship pact on July 11, making official 
the new Articles of Agreement between 
the city and the College. 

At about the same time, announce- 
ment was made of the passage of the 
variable stipend legislation which was 
supported by area representative Alvin 
C. Bush. Under the variable stipend 
funding, the College stands to receive 
about $1.5million of the total $10.6 
million the state will spread among its 
14 community colleges. 

College officials reported that the 
variable stipend funding would help the 
College to offset unanticipated increases 
in tuition for new students living within 
the districts which had formerly spon- 
sored the College. 

In making his presentation in favor 



of city sponsorship. Mayor Lucasi call- 
ed the College "a necessity we can't af- 
ford to lose". He also invited other area 
governing bodies to join in voluntary ar- 
rangements with the College similar to 
that established at that time with the 
Galeton District. 

Sponsorship by local governing 
bodies is mandated by the state law 
which established the community col- 
leges in Pennsylvania. 



One faculty member, surveying 
displaced earth at the foot of Sus- 
quehanna Street ~ where the College's 
new Advanced Technology and Health 
Sciences Center is being buUt ~ was 
heard to quip: 

"From the looks of this, the 
building is definitely going to be bigger 
than a breadbox!" 

The building - which has already 
received national attention for design 



Recreation Center hours listed 

The Recreation Center in the Lifelong^Education Center (LEC) will be clos- 
ed at 3:30 p.m. this Friday, Aug. 30 for the Labor Day weekend but will be 
reopened at 7 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 3, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of College activities. 

The Recreation Center will resume regular hours after the holiday. Those 
hours are: 

Mondays through Thursdays, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

Fridays, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Weekends, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Part-Time Employment 

The following information about part-time employment is provided by 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of advisement. Career Services. Inquiries 
should be directed to him in his office in the Learning Resources Center. 



•will indeed be that: 152,000 square 
feet. 

College officials note that no other 
East Coast facility will offer such com- 
prehensive programming and such 
sophisticated equipment for training in 
advancing technologies such as fiber op- 
tics, laser technology, automated 
manufacturing, robotics, and specialty 
electronics. 

College president Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder called the new building a 
"flagship" for the College and said its 
construction will serve to expand area 
business and to attract new industries to 
the area. 

Fifteen cents of every dollar spent 
on the new facilities comes from local 
sources. The remainder was secured 
from federal and state funding. 

At the College for the June 3 
groundbreaking ceremonies were Penn- 
sylvania Secretary of Commerce James 
0. Pickard, Congressman George W. 
Gekas, and State Sen. Roger A. 
Madigan as well as local government of- 
ficials. 



CommuDily Services, Inc., 520 W. Fourth St., Suite 3-A, Williamsport, 
Pa. 17701 ~ Need 10 part-time (as needed) people for mental health residential 
work. Would act as alternate adviser and would need to administer medication. 
Stop by and fill out an application. 

Hope Enterprises, 1S36 Catherine St., Williamsport, Pa. 17701 ~ Open- 
ings for part-time program aides (20 hours a week). This might be used for an 
internship in the Human Services program. Stop in and fill out an appUcation. 



Save Water! 

If you're not 

going to drink it, 

don't pour it! 



8aSrOTUCHTOSudi;/MMiU;, Ai|. 25/U, IMS 



Run, run, compete, compete: intramurals being organized 



Sign-up rosters for all intramural athletics are available in the 
Recreation Center Office, in the Lifelong Education Center. Copies 
of the rules are also available in that office. {Rules are presented 
here infill, as provided by the Office of College Activities, as a 
campus service of The SPOTLIGHT.] 



Intramural Eag Football 

I Doable Elimination 

Play begins Monday, Sept. 9 

Time Regnlitioni 

Two twenty (20) minute halves. Each half will consist of two (2) ten (10) 
minute quarters. Clock runs continuously throughout game except during last 
two (2) minutes of each half when it is stODDed following each play. In the event 
of a tie at the end of regulation play, there will be a three (3) minute overtime 
period. The clock will stop only during the last minute ot play following the 
stoppage of each play. 

Pliyen 

There must be eight (8) members per team as a minimum requirement and 
there cannot be in excess of eleven (11). However, they must be evenly matched 
in number on the playing Field. An exception would be made only under ap- 
proval of the referee. 

SDbttitntiona 

Substitutions are mandatory after each score. No other substitutions unless 
injury is incurred to player on field. 

EqaipmenI 

No one is liiowed to wear cln(9 with metil spUtes, lielmets, pads or an- 
protecled gluues. Jewelry thai bands and other poleotially dangerous or- 
naments are also prohibited. Players may wear mbber cleats. Players on field 
must wear flags and shirts as issued. 

Game Rules 

The ball begins in play with the flip of a coin for possession. Offense 
receives ball on the 40 yard line. There is no punting or kickoffs on field goals or 
extra point kicking. There is no cross body blocking. Players may not leave their 
feet in blocking. No one is allowed to use their hands. They are prohibited from 
obstructing an opponent with an extended hand or arm. This includes use of a 
stiff arm (offense and defense). 

The ball is dead anytime it touches the ground so there are no fumbles. It is 
dead at the spot where it touches the ground unless it is an incompleted pass. A 
runner may not drop to the ground or dive to the ground to deaden the ball. In 
the event a receiver goes to the ground to catch a pass, the play is still alive as 
long as his flag has not been removed in the process. There is no down counted. 



Deadline for all IM activities 
is Tuesday, Sept. 3 



Each team has four plays to score. If no score is made, the other team 
receives possession of the ball after the fourth try at the same place where the 
ball is downed. 

They may throw consecutive passes. Everyone is eligible to receive a pass so 
the game goes continuously. Each pass does not count as a play. Play actually 
begins when the ball is centered and hiked. Multiple forward passes can be made 
from any spot on the field. 

There is the option for a pass into a goal for a score.'lt would give one 
point when a touchdown is scored. They may run or pass to a player for a two 
point conversion option after touchdown. They have the option for throwing for 
a field goal which must go into the goal net. That would be a three point score. 
Intentions to go for a field goal must be stated to the referee prior to the play. 
The defense must line up at the scrimmage line and can attempt to block only by 
rushing the field goal attempter. Touchdown scores are six points. 

The reason for these changes from the traditional football rules are: 

1. We are playing flag football. It is recommended for recreation 
and fun. 

2. These changes provide for a more wide open, high scoring game, 
and are more efficient for running a tournament. 

Penalties 

There will be 10 yard penalties for chpping, unnecessary roughness, 
unsportsmanUke conduct, personal fouls, offense and defense, pass interference, 
and illegal use of hands. 

There is a five yard penalty for offsides, illegal motion, delay of game, and 
too many players on the field. 

Rashini; 

Defense may rush a maximum of two players on each play from scrimmage. 
Penalty for illegal rushing will be marked off five yards from the line of scrim- 
mage and the down will be replayed. 

All decisions of the officials are final. Other rules that are mentioned will be 
governed by the N.C.A.A. rules. 

A player will be disqualified for repeated rough play and unsportsmanlike 
conduct. A team will be disqualified for repeated violations by team members. 



1. Any full-time or part-time student, faculty, or staff of The WiUiamsport 
Area Commumty CoUege is eUgible to participate in the College's intramural ac- 
tivities. 

2. Players are eligible to enter as an individual participant or as a member 
of a team only once for each different intramural activity ofl^ered. 

3. Any team playing with an ineUgible member will forfeit all events in 
which that person participated. 



Intramural Athletics Eligibility 

4. Any individual (participant or spectator) who acts in an unsportsmanUke 
manner is subject to suspension from further intramural activities. 

5. Every participant is responsible for knowing and adhering to all the rules 
and regulations governing each intramural activity. 

Any questions concerning the College's intramural athletic program 
should be directed to the coordinator of college activities [whose office is on the 
first floor! i" '*« gymnasium. 



Sign as an individual or as a team 

Students can sign-up for intramurals in the Recreation Center Office, 
Room A137, in the Lifelong Education Center (LEC) individually or as part of 
a team. 

Those who sign up individually will be lined up with other students to form 
a team, according to Mrs. Jo Ann R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

"The teams can be all male or all female or they can be coed," Mrs. 
Fremiotti said. She added, "The Race Across the States is an individual activi- 
ty-" 






%"-^-':ti' 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Clean, well-healed rooms available. Close to CoUege. 

Showers, Kitchen. 

$50.00 weekly includes complimenlary breakfast and lunch. 

Contact Barry at 323-3663 or 327-1889 

or at 234 Park SI. [Opposite east parking lot) 






M 
•iit- 

.J 



SPOTLIGHTDSmidiy/Mondiy, Aug. 25/2i, In5a9 



Team Handball Rules 

Begins Tuesday, Sept. 10 



Synopsis 

Team Handball is a fast attacking ballgame played by two teams of seven 
players and five substitutes. The object is to score more goals than the opposing 
team within the time allowed. Players pass or dribble the ball with their hands 
until a shooting opportunity is created. 

Dress 

Team members must wear indentical uniforms that are easily 
distinguishable from those of the opposing team. (To be provided by Intramural 
Athletics.) 

Players 

Each team consists of 12 players maximum. No more than seven players 
per team - six court players and one goalkeeper -- once a game is started, play 
may continue even if a team has fewer than five players on the court. 

Substilotion 

Substitutes may enter the game at any time and as often as required They 
need not notify the timekeeper provided that the players to be replaced have 
already left the court. All players must leave and enter the court within the boun- ' 
daries of their team's substitution area. 

Duration and scoring 

There are two periods of 20 minutes non-stop playing time, with a five 
minute interval between them. In case of a tie, there will be a three interval 
followed by a five minute playing period. 

A goal is scored when the ENTIRE ball crosses over the goal line between 
the post and under the cross bar. A goal will not be allowed if there is an infr- 
ingement by any player of the attacking team before or during the scoring of a 
goal, or if the game official has signaled to interrupt the game before the entire 
ball has crossed the goal line. 

Starting Procedures - Team captains toss for choice of ends or the right to 
throw off. Ends and the right to throw off change for the second period. A new 
toss is held before extra time. 

Rules of play 

Playing the Ball ~ Court players and goalkeepers outside their goal areas 
may: 

(a) Stop, catch, throw, or strike the ball in any manner and in any direc- 
tion using hands, fists, arms, head, torso, thighs, or knees. They may not touch 
the ball with the foot or any part below the knee, except when the ball has been 
thrown at the offender by an opponent. 

(b) Hold the ball for only three seconds maximum. 

(c) Take a maximum of three steps with the ball. 

(d) While standing or running, tap the ball once to the ground and catch it. 

(e) Bounce the ball repeatedly or roll the ball on the ground repeatedly with 
one hand, and then catch the ball or pick it up again. 

Players may not 

(a) Touch the ball more than once unless it contacts aother player, the 
ground or part of the goal between touches. 

(b) DeUberatley play the ball over sidelines or goal line outside players own 
goal. 

(c) Dive for the ball on the ground. 

(d) Keep the ball in team possession if there is not attempt to attack of 
shoot. 

Tackling 

When approaching an opponent, a player may: 

1. Use only hands and arms to gain possession of ball. 

2. Use his open hand to play the ball from an opponent. 

3. Use his torso to obstruct an opponent. 
A player may not: 

1. Pull, hit or use a fist to force the ball out of an opponent's hand. 

2. Use arms, legs, or hands to obstruct an opponent. 

3. Force an opponent into the goal area. 

4. Hold, pust, run into, jump into, hit, or threaten an opponent. 

Goal area rules 

The goal area which includes the goal area line is entered when a player 
touches the ground within and with any part of his body. 

When the ball is in the goal area, it belongs to the goalkeeper. No court 
player may touch the ball once inside the goal area or in possession of the 



A player cannot play the ball into his own goal area. (A penalty throw is 



awarded for this.) 

A goalkeeper may not leave the goal area with the ball under his control or 
touch the ball outside the goal area while he is standing within the goal area. 
Also, he cannot re-enter the goal area with the ball in his possession. 

Throws 

A throw in is awarded when the whole of the ball crosses the sideline or end 
Une. It is taken by a player from a team that did not last touch the ball before it 
crossed the line. 
Throw in 

A throw in is awarded when the whole of the ball crosses the sidehne or end 
line. It is taken by a player from a team that did not last touch the ball before it 
crossed the line. 

The throw in is taken from the spot it went out on the sideline and from the 
comer if it crosses the goal line. 
Goal throw 

A goal throw is taken by the goalkeeper, who must throw the ball from the 
goal area out over the goal area line into the playing area. 

If the goalkeeper last touches the ball and it goes over end line, a goal throw 
is awarded. 
Free throw 

A free throw is taken for any rule infraction occurring and is taken from the 
point where the infringement occurred. 

While the free throw is being taken, the opponents must stay at least three 
meters from the thrower, except they are permitted to stand immediately outside 
goal area line in the free throw is being taken on their free throw line. 

Penally throw 

A penalty throw is taken from the free throw line. All defenders must be 
three meters away from the thrower and no one may touch the ball when it 
touches the goal or goalkeeper. 

A penalty throw is awarded if: 

1 . A court player enters his own goal area to gain an advantage over an at- 
tacking player in possession of the ball. 

2. A goalkeeper entering the goal area with ball in his possession or pulling 
ball in fi'om outside goal area. 

Any ball that touches the ceiling is awarded by a throw in to the team that 
did not cause the infringement. 

Intramural Soccer 

Play begins Tuesday, Sept. 10 

Time regulations 

Two twenty (20) minute halves. Each half will consist of two (2) ten (10) 
minute quarters. Clock runs continuously throughout game except during last 
two (2) minutes of each half when it is stopped following each play. In the event 
of a tie at the end of regulation play, there will be a three (3) minute sudden 
death overtime period. The team scoring the first goal during this period will be 
the victor. In the event there is still a tie, the sequence will resume until a winner 
is determined. The clock will stop only during the last minute of play following 
the stoppage of each play. 

Players 

There must be eleven (II) members per team as a minimum requirement for 
outdoor play and seven (7) members per team for indoor play. However, they 
may discuss any limit conflicts with the referee. 

Snbstitulions 

Substitutions are mandatory at the end of each quarter. This sustitution will 
require complete changing of personnel on the field where possible. This 
substitution rule is enforced to allow all players an opportunity to enjoy playing 
time and is not dependent upon their playing level in the sport. 

Equipment 

No one is allowed to wear cleats with metal spikes, hehnets, pads or un- 
protected glasses. Jewelry that hangs and other potentially dangerous ornaments 
are also prohibited. Players may wear rubber cleats. Players must wear shirts 
as issued. It is suggested players wear knee pads and shin guards. 

Games rules 

Game will be played utilizing rules governed by the American Youth Soccer 
Organization. 

All decisions of the oflicals are final. 

A player will be disqualified for repeated rough play and unsportsmanUke 
conduct. A team will be disqualified for repeated violations by team members. 



lOaSPOTUGHTDSaQdiy/Moodi)'. Aug. 2S/U, 1985 



Race Across the States 
begins Wednesday, Sept. 4 

The Race Across the States is an individual activity within the intramural pro- 
gram. The individual participants may bike, swim, run, or walk - but it is not 
necessary to do all of the activities. 

The "race" begins at 7 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 4. 

Registration deadline - as with all intramural activities - is Tuesday, Sept. 3. 
All information is due at that time in the Recreation Center, according to Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

Rales and Regulations for Race Across the States 

1. Bike, swim, run, walk: don't have to do all. 

2. Race begins Sept. 4, 1985, at 7 a.m. 

3. Registration deadline is Sept. 3, 1985 at 4 p.m. in the Recreation Center. 
Everything is due at that time. 

4. Need name and division. Advanced and Run for Fun. 

5. Map of U.S. on intramural bulletin board: Shows personal progress; it will 
be charted every Monday evening. 

6. Check in at the Recreation Center every Monday between I and 4 p.m. 

7. Don't move your own pin!!! Rec Center personnel will move pins when 
everyone has reported in. 

8. Pin is moved on a weekly basis. 

9. Race ends Oct. 22, 1985, at 4 p.m. 

10. Can report that Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 21 and 22. 

11. Translated values (all averages): One mile run equals 25 miles in Race; 
one-fourth mile swim equals 25 miles in Race; one mile walk equals 25 miles in 
Race; three miles of bike riding equals 25 miles in Race. 

12. An advanced person is a person who does more than 20 miles of walking 
or running, five miles of swimming, or more than 60 miles of biking. Run for Fun 
includes anyone who does less than what is mentioned above. 

13. Awards for all who complete the race, awards to top male and female 
competitors, and awards to top male and female faculty competitors. 

14. The Race simulates about 3,000 miles. 



I 




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BURGER 

KING 



Students: RECEIVE A 10% DISCOUNT 

ON YOUR TOTAL PURCHASE WITH 

PRESENTATION OF YOUR 

CURRENT I.D. CARD 

611 Washington Blvd. • 50 Maynard St. 
Both Locally Owned and Operated 



SGA buys TV for Student Lounge 
and items for other campuses 

At the last meeting of the 1984-1985 academic year, the Student 
Government Association (SGA) decided to make purchases for students at 
three campuses, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities. 

They were: A stamp machine for North Campus, a microwave oven 
for Aviation Campus, and a television for the Student Lounge in the 
Academic Center on main campus. 

Mrs. Fremiotti commented, "If students have any needs or concerns 
about the campus, they should contact the SGA." She added, "I hope the 
students enjoy these items; however, they should respect the property so 
that all students can benefit." 



Library Open 

FOR Welcome Day; 

First Week Hours Listed 

This announcement provided by the Library stcfff 

Welcome back! 

The College Library [in the Learning Resources Center] is open today, 
Sunday, Aug. 25, from 2 to 7 p.m. 

Come browse among our 500 magazines, 35,000 books, and over 
1,000 audiovisual materials. We feature special displays, new books, and 
an expanded Learning Lab. 

During the first week of classes, the Library will be open from 8 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Evening hours will begin Tuesday, Sept. 3, and will continue Mon- 
days through Thursdays with a 9 p.m. closing time. 

The Library staff looks forward to helping you... Come visit us! 



JOIN 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 




INTERESTED IN JOINING 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION? 

Complete this form and take it to... 

The Recreation Office, Room A138, 

Lifelong Education Center (LEC)! 

• • • 

Name.. 



Social Security Number 

Faculty Adviser (if known) 

Home Address (inclnde ZIP)_ 



.CnrricDlain. 



Home Telephone Number w/Area Code. 
Local Address 



Local Telephone Namber. 



Comments (prerioas exeriences; interests, etc.): 



Have a Say... Join SGA! 




SPOTLIGHTDSuodiy/Moidiy. Aog. Z$/26, IMJoll 



Phi BeU Lunbd* officen for thb year iiiflBde (from left) Daaiel L. Thorp, 
bnsiDCH accounting stodenl from Troy, treainrer; Richard L. Evans Jr., 
bosiness accoanting slndenl from Philipsbnrg, administrative aide; Brenda J. 
Wolfe, computer science student from Montoursville, secretary; Ceylon S. 
(Lonnie) Reinard, business accounting student from Port Trevorton, president, 
and Marli A. Cormier, electronics stndent from Sinldng Springs, vice presi- 
dent. Not present when photo was taiien was Judy L. Brokaw, computer 
science student from Canton, administrative aide. fSPOTUGHTJile photoj 

Phi Beta Lambda begins 16th year 
as part of the Community College 

Report provided by Phi Beta Lambda representative 

It's Fall 1985 and Phi Beta Lambda is beginning its 16tli year of operating 
as the business club on The Williamsport Area Community College campus. 
PBL at the College is one of 37 chapters located at 37 colleges and universities in 
the state of Pennsylvania. 

Newly-elected officers who will 
serve this year are pictured or named at 
right. 

The club has met several times dur- 
ing the summer at picnics and other 
social affairs. Plans for the coming 
semester include the annual picnic buffet 
supper at the adviser's home, the 
preparation of a float for the South 
Williamsport Mummers' Day parade, a 
hayride, and Halloween party. 

Recruiting plans are incomplete but 
will be announced shortly. Complete 
plans will be announced in The 
SPOTLIGHT. 

The PBL state office and local of- 
fice is located in Room 3, lower level, 
Academic Center. Everyone in the 
Business and Computer Technologies 
Division is welcome to stop in and say 
heUo. 



SPOTLIGHT accepting 
applications for staff 

The SPOTLIGHT, the College's 
student newspaper, is accepting applica- 
tions from those interested in becoming 
part of the staff. 

Those interested in writing news, 
writing of other types, in creating il- 
lustrations, taking photos, doing layout, 
doing paste-up and/or assisting in office 
management should apply, according to 
Anthony N. Cillo. faculty adviser. 

Sosqaehanna Room 
first day meno listed 

Continued fiom Page iBaa 
Italian bread, $2.39. 

Sandwiches: Quarter Pounder, $1.2S; 
Cheeseburger, $1.35; Cheeseburger, $1,35; Piz- 
za, .55; Pizza with topping, .70; AM hoagie, 
$1.49; turkey, $1.59; tuna salad, $1.59; chicken 
salad, $1.59, French fries, .55. 
Daily Salad Bar: Super Bowl, cole slaw, 
tomatoes, onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green 
peppers, radishes, spinach, applesauce, eggs, 
bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple 
butter, Jello, potato salad, com relish. 
Daily Breakfast: Scrambled eggs, .59; hash 
browns, .55; home fries, .55; pancakes. $1.29; 
French loast, .99; waffles, .99; sausage. .79; 
muffin supreme, $1.09; croissant surprise, 
$1.39; Colorado piu pocket, $1.59. 



CUlo's 

College Corner 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Ceiter) 

Phone 323-1321 

Open for Brtdifut 

• • • 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half nib 

Four winners 
every week 



Your favorite Subs and 
Burgers the way yon like 'em 




Sanaer ia Review: TUrd door of 
Academic Center may have looked like 
someone was moving in... or onl... but 
Ktaally, offices were bciag rtfnriiisbed 
before the start of the Fall semester. 



WWAS-88FM Staff Application 



Please return to: WWAS-88FM, Room 104, Lifelong Education Center (LEQ. 



M«|or_ 



Scmeiter Slimliiig_ 



Eipeclei) Date of GndBilloii_ 



DeKribe uj previoat expericiice foa liaTe had in radio, broadcudni, pnblic ipeiklng, loicuia, etc. 



Do yon know anyone who It currently on WW AS itifl? If ;«, wbo?_ 
Whit do ron hope to accomplish at WW AS? 



Pofidon in which yon are lalemted: 

DJ Show PrctmwxtiU 

N«wi Sporta 



Prodndloi/En(iic<fli|_ 



PHNMlioni/PiMidI;. 



OcnlopBcal-Underwritini, rndralilii, etc.. 



PttoM NoU: Alt appttanlsjdr acHvt mtmbtiMp »/ WWAS must to aumtly n/lsUitd HadmO (WM tliaa) or aumttly 
faculty or st^ff membm o/ Hu WiltUmapoH Ana Commuitty College. 



lloSPOTUGHTDSudar/Moiril}, Ai|. ISIU, inS 



CAMPUS MAP 



ATC — Automotive Trades Center 

Auto Body Repair 
Automotive Mechanics 
Automotive Technology 
Transportation Technology Office 

DC — Diesel Center 

Diesel Mechanics 
Diesel Technology 

TTC - Technical Trades Center 

Secondary Vocational Programs Office 

TT1 

Secondary Automotive 

rr2&TT3 

Electrical Occupations 

Electrical Technology 

TT4 

Machine Tool Technology 

Machinist General 

MTC - Metal Trades Center 

Welding 

Industrial Technology Office 

GYM — Gymnasiunn 

Physical Education it Health 
Intramural Athletics & College Activities 
Student Health Services 

LRC — Learning Resources Center* 

Advisement & Career Services Center 

Architectural Technology 

Bookstore 

Cooperative Education, Postsecondary 

Developmental Studies b Act 101 

Library 

Mathematics/ English Laboratories 

Media Center 

Reading Laboratories 

BTC — Building Trades Center 

Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration 

Carpentry b Building Construction Technology 

Construction Technology 

Plumbing and Heating 

Construction Technology Office 



LEC ~ Lifelong Education Center 
Broadcasting 
Dietetic Technician 
Engineering Drafting Technology 
Food & Hospitality Management 
Industrial Drafting 
Quantity Foods 
Recreation Center 
Science Laboratories 
Tool Design Technology 
Student Government Office 
Susquehanna Room (Food Service Area) 
WWAS - Radio 
President 

Associate Academic Dean 
Associate Dean, Educational Services 
College Information & Community Relations 
College Foundation 
Dean, Academic Affairs 
Dean, Administration 
Dean, Development 
Dean, Educational Research, 

Planning & Evaluation 
Dean, Employee & Community Relations 
Dean, Student Services 
Executive Assistant for Internal Affairs 
Personnel 

ACC — Academic Center* 

Accounting 

Advertising Art 

Business Management 

Clerical Studies 

Computer Information Systems 

Dental Hygiene 

Electronics Technology 

English 

Graphic Arts 

Human Service 

Journalism 

Mathematical Computer Science 

Practical Nursing 

Printing 

Radiography 

Retail Management 

Secretarial Office Administration 

Surgical Technology 



Technical Illustration 

Word Processing 

Admissions 

Bursar 

Business & Computer Technologies Office 

Business Er Financial Operations 

Career Options 

Center for Lifelong Education 

Computer Center 

Duplicating £r Mail Services 

Financial Aid 

Health Sciences Office 

Integrated Studies Office 

SPOTLIGHT 

Staff and Program Development 

Student Records 

Veterans' Information 

GS — General Services 

Dean, General Services 
Security 

W — Warehouse 

AVC — Aviation Center 

Aviation Maintenance Technology 
Aviation Technology 

ESC — Earth Science Center 
Agribusiness 
Floriculture 
Forest Technology 
Nursery Management 
Outdoor Power Equipment 
Service & Operation of 

Heavy Construction Equipment 
Wood Products Technology 
Natural Resources Management Office 



'Elevators provide access to the upper floors of 
these buildings. Access to the second floor of 
the Gymnasium and the Lifelong Education 
Center is through the second floor of the 
Learning Resources Center, 




lUnder Consti 




WHbavort Am Comiiftf M^ • W 



l2Pi|a 
WIHuifon, Ft. 1T7«1 



The Student Govenunent Association (SGA) will sponsor a dance - free to 
students of the College - in conjunction with WWAS-88FM, the student- 
operated radio station, tomorrow. 

The dance will be from 8:30 to 11 p.m. in the Susquehanna Room in the 
Lifelong Education Center (LEC), according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

Student identification card presentation will be required, she said. 

Music will be coordinated by broadcasting students Michael A. Wright, of 
Shickshinny, who is the station's general manager, and Brian J. Hill, of Mon- 
tgomery, operations director. 

Music will include dance-oriented rock and the latest Top 40s. 

Promotion director for the Auction is Frank (Pete) J. Nierle, broadcast stu- 
dent from WiUiamsport. 



Student Government 

sponsoring dance tomorrow; 

WWAS-88FM providing music 



Le Jeune Chef 
restaurant 
reopens Sept. 18 



Le Jeune Chef, the on-campus 
student-operated restaurant, will be 
opened for luncheon business on 
Wednesday, Sept. 18, aaording to Miss 
Judith M. Patschke and Dr. Cynthia 
Schloss, co-istructors of quantity food 
production and service. 



The restaurant wil! be opened from 
11 a.m. to I p.m., excluding 
Thursdays. It is open not only for the 
College community but also for the 
pubUc. 

Miss Patschke stated that in addi- 
tion to the regular menu, daily specials 



and a la carte items, new gourmet 
salads and light entrees will be offered. 

She also said the restaurant will be 
operated by both secondary and 
postsecondary students. 

Evening meals will not be offered 
until January 1986. 



Next Week: Will mother be a fullback? 



IdSPOTUGHTDTickIi;, Stpl. 3. IMS 



"Oh, I never eat 
breakfast..." 



The Moil ImportiDl Lesson 
One Cin Letrn 



Contributed by Mn. VMtn P. Moon 
Assodite Professor of Food Serrkes 

What good is the training for a profes- 
sional career if one is absent from work 
because of illness or becomes incapacitated 
because of some other health problem? When 
these events happen, one is usually inclined to 
feel that they are the victim of circumstances 
and there's nothing they could have done to 
prevent it. 

• • • 

The truth is: the human body can put up 
with abuse for several years. One may feel he 
or she doesn't need breakfast... or that coffee, 
alcohol, and cigarettes will never harm them. 

For years, they'll ignore the minor 
symptoms but when the symptoms become in- 
capacitating, the damage has been done and 
complete recovery is questionable. 

The major nutrition or health problem 
today is not that the public isn't interested or 
informed about nutrition but it's making the 
public aware of whit they know that Isn't 



Health frauds make all kinds of promises 
to sell their products. An example is the 
Prevention & Organic Gardening "cartel" 
which uses their pubUcations to promote sup- 
plements in a manner they cannot put on their 
labels or the Food and Drug Administration 
could prosecute. 

It is only 10% accurate in nutrition in- 
formation, but still making millions i)n the 
supplements - many of which are dangerous 
to a pereoa's health. It's even more confusing 
because many doctors have had very little 
nutrition education and will quote misleading 
information from Prevention. 
• • • 

Emphasis in nutrition comes like waves 
over the public - drowning them in informa- 
tion and creating fear for their Uves. With 
each wave, those who are confused jump on 
the highest wave of information, go over- 
board with that nutrient or trend - and either 
overdose to toxicity or neglect another area of 
nutrition and fitness. 



The answer is still: Break the night of 
fasting with a grain and animal protein and a 
fruit. 

Eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, com- 
plex starches, and protein every three or four 
hours throughout the day. 

Drink plenty of water; this is a filling 
nutrient which gives no calories or odd com- 
binations of chemicals (such as diet colas do). 
This eating and drinking practice keeps 
one from craving and eating excess amounts 
- especially in the evening when the calories 
are not burned but instead are converted to 
adipose (fat) tissue. 

Nutrition plays a major role in 
osteoporosis, because that's not just calcium 
shortage as the supplement ads and many 
doctors will have one believe. 

Cholesterol in one's blood vessels is not 
just the result of cholesterol in one's diet. Caf- 
feine also plays a role. 

Hypertension and high blood pressure is 
not the result of sodium consumption, but 
calcium and phosphorus also play a part. 
• • • 
The cause of PMS (premenstrual syn- 
drome) now is theorized as being due to 
thyroid malfimction. What causes that? Poor 
diet or body trauma, such as an accident with 
sudden loss of blood. 

What's happening to the liver and 
kidneys of athletes who overdose with the pro- 
tein supplements? Why are there so many 
people requiring dialysis treatment today? 

And so the list goes on. Extreme intakes 
or abstention. The answer still is: 

...Eal the known and tested basic foor 
food groups in proper amounts at pro- 
per times tlironghout the day. 

[Special topic articles will be presented 
in more detail as readers request them. Just 
remember your education is not complete if 
you have not learned to do preventative 
maintenance on your own body... ypmj 



J^'VVWrtrtArtAAMrtrtArtflrtlWUVWAftAIVVWIVWWVWVVWW^^ 



It's got gore... 
it's got intrigue 



TouQH Guys Don't Dance 

A noval by Norman Millar 



Book Review by Cynthia E. A. Hartranft 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



The scene for this suspenseful murder 
novel Is set In Provlncetown. Rhode Island, 
on Cape Cod. 

Tim Madden, the main character. Is a 
writer - who, at times, seems quite Insane. 
Madden's wife, Patty Larelne, decamped 
weeks earlier and Tim has been on a 
drunken binge since. 

D D D 

A bizarre set of circumstances arise 
when Madden wakes up on one "morning 
after" and discovers a profusion of blood on 
the passenger side of his Porche. 

A few days later, Tim finds the head of a 
woman hidden In his marijuana stash. 



Madden Is trying to sort out the events 
of that night - which he can't recall due to his 
Infestation of alcohol - when yet another 
woman's head turns up. 

D n D 

Has he committed murder? Tension 
flows from a clue revealed here and from in- 
formation withheld there. 

Quite a strange array of characters Is In- 
troduced as the plot develops. 

Tough Guys Don't Dance is 
suspenseful, yet humorous, with an abun- 
dance of murder, gore, and Intrigue. 
Guaranteed to keep you reading. This is a 
real "whodunnit". 



'''''^'''^^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^^*^^ 



Gamma Epsilon Tau, 

graphic arts fraternity 

traces itself back 

to early days of College 



gPOTUGHTDTioda;, Scpl. 3, INSoS 



New members sought; 
meeting today at noon 



B; Wanna F. Brown 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



Gamma Epsilon Tau (GET) is a service fraternity to the graphic arts in- 
dustry and a chapter was started here at the College in 1965, according to Fred 

C. Schaefer Jr., assistant professor of graphic arts and faculty adviser to the 
group. 

The fraternity does service projects for the community and for the College. 
Members also take part in field trips which relate to the graphic arts field, in- 
cluding visits to Eastman-Kodak in Rochester, N.Y.; Gutenburg Printing Shop 
and Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) which also is the headquarters for 
Gamma Epsilon Tau. 

• • • 

The College's GET chapter is the only one in this area, according to Scott 

D. Dickerson, graphic arts student from Easton and GET president. 

To become an officer in the group, one has to be nominated. Officers may 
only hold one office for one semester. One caimot hold the same office two 
semesters in a row. However, when one has completed the term of a particular 
office, he or she may be nominated for a different officer position. There are 
four officer positions: president, vice president, secretary, and treasurer. 

• • • 

After having served as an officer, a member may become a member of the ad- 
visory committee. Once a GET member is graduated, he or she automaticaly has 
a hfetime membership. They then may attend the annual GET picnic (for all cur- 
rent and past members) which offers the opportunity to meet again as well as to 
meet new members and they may also get insight on the job market in the 
graphic arts field, according to Dickerson. 

The fraternity is seeking new members. GET meets weekly. The next 
meeting is at noon today in Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

"All graphic arts students are welcome to attend," Dickerson said. 



FOR SALE: CAMERA 
Cannon AEl Program 

Manoal/Anlomatic. New Condition, 
Electronic Flash, Carrying Case, and 
Tripod with Carrying Case. $230. Con- 
tact John at 327-1416 anytime daring 
the day or Tuesday and Friday nights. 
fadvl.l 



Oops! 

VJe really do know our right 
from our left... honest! 

The references were mixed 
up, obviously, last week for the 
photos on Page 1 . Any inconve- 
nience to those pictured is regret- 
ted. 



SPOTUOHT 
Tundiy, Sept 3, l«SS - Vol. 21 , No. 2 

Tt\e SPOTUGHT is published each Monday morning ol the academic year, ex- 
cept for College vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The 
Williamsport Area Community College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W. Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 
17701. Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Extension 221. 



STAFF THIS ISSUE 

Wanna F. Brown, Timothy F. Noldig, LaRoy S. Whitmir* Jr., 
Cythnia E. A. Hartranft, Sandra L. Muagrava, LyI* A. Wagnor, 
Kathloan L. Elsiwart, Kathy Cobb, Catharine A. Hannon. 

Faculty advlsar Anthony N. Clllo 




GAMMA EPSILON TAU offictrs for this year art, from left, Margaret L. 
Bamhart, secretary, of Denver; Susan M. Ale, vice president, of Danville; 
Scott D. Dickerson, president, of Easlon, and James D. Wither 3rd, treasurer, 
of Williamsport. [SPOTLIGHT file pholoj 




4n$P0TUGHTDTieidij, Sept. 3, 1W5 



Getting the ID card... 

SPOTLIGHT pholoj by Timoth]' F. Neidig 




ABOVE: Scolt D. Dickenon, graphic iris slodent from Euton; Mn. JoAnn R. Frtmiolti, coordinator of Col- 
lege actiTilies; Robert A. Young, Recrtilion Center issistint, and Mrs. Rie A. Bongiori, secrettry to the coordinator 
of College activities, aisisi in the validation of student identification cards. 

BELOW: New and returning students waited in line at the table in the Recreation Center tQ gel identification 
cards or to get ID cards validated. 



Nearly 1,500 

vehicles 

registered 

Nearly 1,500 vehicles have been 
registered to park on campus, according 
to Cecil C. Cryder, chief of security. 

However, Cryder said student- 
stickered vehicles parked in faculty lots 
is a problem so far this semester. 

With a S3 fine charged for that 
violation, Cryder said, "We don't want 
to fine them, but we must control the 
parking." 

Cryder warns against parking near 
or around construction sites. "It can be 
a hazard," he said and added, "We 
wouldn't want any one to get hurt with 
all the equipment around." 

In addition, Cryder suggests having 
consideration for neighbors around the 
College by not parking in driveways or 
blocking them. 

He noted that a fine from the city 
poUce can be given. 

For students who have not 
registered their vehicles yet, Cryder gave 
a reminder to do so, adding, "The fine 
for not having a sticker while parked in 
a stickered lot will soon be $25. 

'Race' deadline, 
IM deadlines 
extended one week 

The deadlines for registering to 
enter the "Race Across the States" as 
well as intramural activities have been 
extended, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

The "Race Across the States" is 
an individual activity. The participants 
may bike, swim, run,or walk - but need 
not do all of the activities. 

The registration deadlines have 
been extended one week, she said: The 
deadline now is next Tuesday, Sept. 10. 

Additional information and sign- 
up sheets are available in the Recreation 
Center, Room A137, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 



• Student Health ^ 
it Insurance ^ 

student Health Insurance Forms 

are available in 

Health Services... Room 104, Gym 

Hours... 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Anyone who v\/ishes to buy insurance 

must do so by Oct. 1 , 1 985 for this year. 



^ Apply for SGA Senator M 

All students interested in becoming 

a Senator in the 

Student Government Association 

Interviews are being held today 

from 4 to 6 p.m. 

in Room B107, 

Lifelong Education Center (LEC) 



SPOTUGHTDTntlt;, Stft. J, 1N5d5 



W.A.C.C. 



Horizons 




Summer in Review 
Booksloic reidied diirtBg (be nunffler for iemester open- 
ing: CbecUng newty-arriTed books in tlie College 
Bookstore is Florence Greninger, Bookstore enqiloyee 
from WUUamsport. Cleaning the floor is Hanild L. 
Holcomb, general studies student wbo was a summer 
employee. [SPOTLIGHT photos by Wanna F. Brown/ 



Answer These Please 



Am I right 

Am I wrong 
Are yon sure 

Do we belong 
Is truth... TRUTH 

Are lies really LIES 
Can we endure 

Knowing MAN dies 
Which way u up 

What really is down 
Do we ever make sense 

Or is everyone a clown 
Are questions ever answered 

Would, Should, such things matter 
Shall money be worth having 

If there's no food on the platter 
Where can we hide 

Doesn't everyone wish to be seen 
Why must we hate 

Have yon Uvcd life honest and dean 
Heyl Are you Happy 

Have times made yon sad 
Did yon earn all your riches 

What's the difference of good and bad 
Has yoor yes ever meant No 

Was your no ever a YES 
Are yon even a person 

Or Just one big mess 
Can yon change 

WiU yon try 
Don't you care 

If you live or die 



- LYLE A. WAGNER 

Gnptic uti itidnl troa MflhiOe 





J 







AND I SAW HER 



By Robert L. English, human services student from Jersey Shore 



1 saw her there, 
Standing among the statues. 
All the others were stone, 
None could compare. 

She has an earth-real beauty. 
Flashing eyes of blue fire, 
A mane of bmnette mink. 
And a smile white as lightning. 

Her vibrations says "Hello and Welcome" 
Leaving much for interpretation, 
Hope she is simpatico. 
Truly a living mortal Venus. 



6DSP0TUGBTDTu*iT, Stft. 3, 1M5 



Indian Park Project... 





aiwt 




Jcffrt; Edwtnta: Doing hii pvt of the job 



"♦''VV- 






n 



ap«r". 



Wiyoe Rickird, left, tnd Leonvd Pizit, Kerin Winter, and William Starr are 
Leonird Pizia gives tbe camera a smile while preparing to operate his machine making sure things are mnning smoothly 



m 




According to Benjamin H. 
Eidred, uiislait professor, 
serrice and operation of 
heaTj coutractloH cqaip- 
menl, said be feeb tbe pro- 
ject b a worthwhile learning 
eiperience for stndents In- 
TolTed. Eklitd noted that 
tbe job b abont one-third 
complele. 




Grading and moTlng earth b the job for SAO stndenta 



Brian Perry bi another phase of the job 



SPOTUGHTDI^tidir.Scpl. 3, IMSQ? 




CoBCKte pipe wiiting to be pat in place 



...moving right along 




Wayne Riclcard ind Dorotliea Jolini 




^S^' 



W -(* 




Lee Swartz operatinit U>e backhoe 



Brian Perry woridn' the motor grader 




SPOTUGHT pbotoi 

coitribited by 

Baiban A. Martin, 

ol Monloarnile RO 4 




Al Gretb, left, and Kevin Winter checit the equipment 



Just how big IS that equipment? Asli Bobby 
Swisher, photographer's nephew from 
HaghesvUle. 



SaSPOTUGHTOTMiiir, Scft ), INS 




Happy Again 



By Robert L. English 

hDmin icrvkes stndent 

from Jersey Shore 

Well, here I are again, 
Another borin summer shot. 
Time to brake the munotenee. 

A man needs his diverzions, 
Nothin better in frustratin Prooffs, 
Exceptio partyen or boogyen till dawn. 

Can't waite for the eats eether, 
Just place your order. 
It serves itself, leggs en all. 

Can you digg it, 
Eyeballin the new chicks, 
Hardly outta the shells. 

I'll show uffl the ropes, 

I'm perfect for it. 

Was on em all lass year. 

Gotta be careftil tho, 
Dun't waima git hung, 
Some people ain't humorous. 

Oh well, what the hell, 
Gotta keep a steppin, 
I'm happy again. 




Summer in Review 
Between clisati: Eqioying the weather daring the sam- 
■er session ire Pu) R. Hnffmu, food ud hospitaUty 
stndeni from Muncy, and Lyic A. Wagner , graphic arts 
stadent from MiUriDe. /SPOTUGHT photo by Wanna 
F. Brown/ 



Summer in Review 

Snsan K. Baker, Bookstore derk, was at work this snmnser 

when captured by photographer. The "qniet" of the store dnring 

the sommer changed once the new semester started! [SPOTUGHT 

photo by Timothy F. Neidig] 



gPOnjGHTO'hadir, Sept. 3, inSa9 



\ 



^^% 




Summer in Review 
Working hard dnring sommer internship: Melissa J. 
Phillips, word processing student from Williuuport, 
wu usigned to the Integrated Studies Division Office in 
the Academic Center. [SPOTLIGHT photo by Wanna 
F. Brown] 



;;:sW»a%¥ft4S¥:SWJiWi:SfSSW?<¥-;f#^^ 




SPOTUGHTing Alumni... 
Back to do TV coverage of Little League 
Brian EcUey relaies as he chats with SPOTLIGHT reporter (not 
shown) white visiting student newspaper office daring Little League 
World Series Week. Eckley, a MonloursTille native and gradoale of (he 
College, was back in Williamsport to cover the Little League World 
Series for television station WCYB, Bristol, Va. Eckley is a production 
crew chief for the station. The television station includes the Morristown, 
Tenn. area - out of which one of the Series teams came. A 1982 
graduate of the Community College, he went on to Kntzlown University 
to major in telecommunications and was graduated from there in 1984. 



ACROSS 
1 Greek letter 
4 Protective 

ditch 
6 Unexploded 

shell 

11 Sly look 

12 Competent 

13 Greek letter 

14 King ol 
Bashan 

15 Hit lightly 

17 Great regard 
19 Scottish cap 
21 High 
mountain 

23 Drinks slowly 

24 Strike 

26 Shade tree 
26 Saucy 
31 Footlike part 
33 Organ of 
hearing 

35 Spanish for 

36 Pronoun 
38 Clothing 

41 Hebrew letter 

42 Informed: 
colloq 

44 Affirmative 

45 Seed 
container 

47 City in Russia 
49 Marry 
51 Forest 
54 Sesame 
56 Obstruct 

58 Attempt 

59 Entrance 
62 Inlet 

64 Preposition 

65 Native metal 

66 Possessive 
pronoun 

66 Liberate 

70 Pigeon pea 

71 Epic poetry 

72 Hindu 
cymbals 



DOWN 

1 Royal 

2 Pronoun 

3 Choose 

4 Shade Ire' 

Siberia 



7 Girl' 
nickname 

Sfalore 
profound 

9 Southwest- 
ern Indian 
10 Obstruct 



16 Cooled lava 
18 Gratuity 
20 Chart 
22 Gratified 
25 Edible seed 
27 Deface 

29 Tear 

30 Pedal digit 
32 Secret agent 
34 Corded cloth 

36 Pronoun 

37 Without end: 



CROSS 
WORD 
PUZZLE 

Amwer oa Ptge 10 



poetic 

39 Church 
bench 

40 Base 
43 Sea bird 
46 Speck 

46 Illuminated 
50 Challenges 



55 Crippled 

57 Note of scale 

59 Seed 
container 

60 Anglo-Saxor> 
money 

61 Brim 

63 Rear of ship 




1983 Unlled Feature Syndicate. I 



Save Water! 










If you're 


not 


going 


to drink it, 
don't pour 


it! 



% 



\ BARRY S 




Open 6 a.m. to midnight 
Monday thru Saturday 



Brooklyn Style Eatery 

•A Unique eating Experience 
•Best Breakfast in town 
•Arcade and pool Table 
•Daily Specials 



2 



234 Park St. Just across from 
PHONE 
323-FOOD "'^ "'^ ^"^^ parking lot 



lOaSPOTUGHTDTleMtaj, Stpl. }, IMS 

Susquehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 

The Susquehanna Room's menu 
for the week starting today, Tuesday, 
Sept. 3 is presented as furnished by the 
Susquehanna Room management. 
DiU; Bmkful 

Scrambled eggs, 59'; hash browns, 55'; 
home fries, 55'; pancakes, $1.29; French Coast, 
99'; waffles, 99'; sausage, 79*; Muffin Supreme, 
$1.09; Croissant Surprise, $1.39; Colorado piU 
pocket, $1.59. 

Dili; Silid Bar 

Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomoaioes, 
onions, broccoli, auliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, 
bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple 
butter, Jello, potato salad, com relish. 

Today, Tindi;, Sqit. 3 
Loocb 

Sweet and sour meatballs, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59; Yankee pot roast, gravy, 
potato and vegetable, $2.59. 
Soup 

French onion or Manhattan clam chowder. 
Dinner 

Fried pork chop, gravy, potatoes, and 
vegetable, $2.89; Colorado cube steak, gravy, 
potatoes, and vegetable, $2.69. 
Sandwkbo 

Quarter pounder, $1.23; cheeseburger, 
SI. 35; pizza, 55'; pizza with lopping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; steak and cheese, $1.79; tuna 
lalad sandwich, $1.59; mcalloaf sandwich, 
$1.29; French fries, 55". 




Wedneada;, Sept. 4 
Lucb 

Sausage and peppers, homefries, $2.39; 
chicken nuggets, potatoes, vegetable, $2.39. 
Soap 
Chicken noodle, cream of potato. 

Dinner 
Manicotti and small salad bar, Italian 
bread, $2.89; Maryland crab cakes, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.59. 

Sandwlcba 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger. 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with lopping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; turkey sandwich, $1.59; ham 
■alad sandwich, $1.39; taco, 99"; French fries, 
55'. 



Tbinday, Sept. 5 
LoDcb 

Kielbassi and pierogi, vegetable, $2.39; 
lamale pie, vegetable, $1.99. 
Sonp 
Chili or vegetable beef. 
Dinner 
Filled quarter chicket, gravy, potatoes, and 
vegetable, $2.59; ground round steak, gravy, 
potatoes, vegetable. $2.59. 
Sandwkhct 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger. 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with lopping, 70'; Am 



THE USUAL RUSH - The CoUege Bookstore wis "popular" list week as 
ilndenii lined up to get lexis for Fill Semester courses. Students were directed 
to will In Ibe corridor and to enter in small groups lo avoid congestion Inside 
the store. /SPOTLIGHT photo by Timothy F. Neidig/ 

PBL recruiting begins today 

Formal recruiting begins at 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 28. 
today in the Academic Center lobby for 
students interested in joining Phi Beta 
Lambda (PBL), according to Paul W. 
Goldfeder, assistant professor of 
business and organization adviser. 

Recruiting will continue until Sept. 
14. 

According to Goldfeder, the 
organization is open to students taking 
courses in the business or computer 
science programs. 

Applications are availble in the 
PBL office. Room 3, in the basement of 
the Academic Center. 

"There are a few community pro- 
jects in the planning stage now, and they 
will be discussed at the first meeting," 
said Goldfeder. Also to be discusses are 
plans to attend the statewide Fall 



"Business and computer science 
students should sign up now and be a 
member of one of the most outstanding 
clubs on campus," Goldfeder com- 
mented. 

The first informal open meeting 
will be announced in next week's issue 
of The SPOTLIGHT. 

Bookstore hours change 
this coming Monday 

The College Bookstore will resume 
regular hours beginning this coming 
Monday, Sept. 9, according to informa- 
tion posted at the store. Those hours 
are: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. 

Trustees meet Thursday 

The College Board of Trustees will 



workshoptobeheldinStateCollegeon Snl LS.^n^Cen'r ^^ " '"' 



Students may still 
sign for intramurals 

Students may still sign for in- 
tramurals in the Recreation Center Of- 
fice, Room A 1 37 in Lifelong Education 
Center, according to Robert A. Young, 
Recreation Center assistant. 

The sign-up deadline for in- 
tramurals has been extended a week, he 
said. 

Sports being offered are flag foot- 
ball, team handball, soccer, volleyball, 
pickleball, and basketball. 

Rules and regulations sheets may 
be picked up in the Recreation Center 
Office. 

Individuals or groups (teams) may 
sign up. 



Cillo's 

College 
Corner 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Phone 323-1321 

HOURS • Mon. thru Thurs. 

7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 a.m. lo 4 p.m. 

Open for Breakfast 

ir ir ic 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 

Four winners 
every week 

• • • 

Your favorite Subs and 

Burgers the way you like 'em 

Come on over and gel 
somethin ' good to eat! 



SHARE APARTMENT 

Large Bedroom, Living Room, 

Kitchen. Bath. $130 Monthly. 

Everything included - Even Cable TV. 

See Michael Shumaker, 869 Second 

^^„.^^ Street, above Joe Mignino's Sub Shop. 

hoagie, $1.49; chicken hoagie, $1.59; sausage /'"'•''•/ 

hoagie, $1.59; chili dog, 89"; French fries, 55'. 

Frtdar, Stpl. ( 
Uack 

Ham and broccoli Benedict over English 
muffin, $2.39; stuffed pepper, potatoes and 
vegeuble, $2.39. 

Sonp 
Com chowder, beef noodle. 

DIucr 
Western beef roast, gravy, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.89; Open face Reuben, pouto, 
vegeUble, $2.89. 

Sandwlcba 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 

$1.35; pizza. 55'; pizza with lopping, 70"; Am. 

hoagie, $1.49; meatball hoagie, $1.59; chicken 

salad, $1.59; egg salad, $1.29; French fries, 55". 



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Ernia oQii aoEi 
aaoei nna Eiana 

sna Eiod nan 

□oanso ana sei 


V 1 3«3h a vBTmrm 


o|n|ali|y|oLI,jM|H|i 



BENSON 



€Ifit mini 
/^mmarket 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



JOMsuv aizznd 



Snacks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 



ALWAYS OPEN - ALL NIGHT, HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 

'Si oor.f^r%rM^^f^i-ii^,.r-.-^P ii ^n nnmnnnnt-in n noDD o uLU ■- 



Student Government Assn. holds first meeting 



SPOTUGHTaTiodi;, Sept. 3, IMSoll 



By WaoM F. Brown 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



The Student Government Association 
(SGA) held its first meeting last Tuesday, Aug. 
27, in the LeJeune Chef Restaurant. 

There were 26 in attendance, including 17 
persons new to the College. 

Also present were Mis. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of College activities; Dr. Peter B. 
Dufflanis, professor of English and a member of 
the advisory board; Dr. WiUiam J. Martin, dean 
of student services and a member of the advisory 
board; Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, director of In- 
tegrated Studies Division and a member of the 
advisory board; Chester D. Shuman, director of 
admissions and College activities and a member 
of the advisory board. 

Four returning SGA senators attended the 
meeting. 

Gladys E. Hunsinger, an electrical 
technology student from Austin and SGA 
senator, reviewed what SGA achieved last 



semester and noted that SGA had, among other 
things, purchased a stamp machine for North 
Campus, had purchased a microwave oven for 
the Aviation Campus, and had purchased a col- 
or television set for the Academic Center Student 
Lounge, Main Campus. 

The Student Government Association, it 
was also noted, helps with various activities such 
as the Bloodfflobile visits and dances. Active in 
the sponsorship issue, the report noted, SGA did 
advertising for the College. 

The purpose of SGA is to represent the stu- 
dent body through the Senate which consists of 
16 students - two persons from each of the eight 
divisions on campus ~ Ms. Hunsinger said. 

Interviews will be held today from 4 to 6 
p.m. in Room B107, Lifelong Education Center, 
for all students interested in becoming a senator, 
said Mrs. Fremiotti. 



^^^^mu^M^^'^^^mm^i^^mmmmmmmmsfm^mmj^^^mm 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Clean, well-healed rooms available. Close to College. 

Showers, Kitchen. 

$50.00 weekly includes complimentary breakfast and Innch. 

Contact Barry al 32J-FOOD or at 234 Park St. 

(Opposite east parking lot) 



WWAS staff looks to Sept. 9 

Ms. Janie K. Swartz, mass com- 
munications instruction and faculty ad- 
viser for student-radio WWAS-88FM, 
last week said she and the staff hope to 
be on the air starting next Monday, 
Sept. 9. The station uses position 88 on 
the FM dial. 




you haven't had a Hoagie 

until you ve had a 

HOBY 

HOBY'S HOAGIES 
and PIZZA 

508 Fifth Avenue 

2 blocks north of WACC. 

•Croat from Home Svc. Bovorag* 

322-5455 

Free Delivery 

Limited Area • Minimum Order i4.00 

WITH THIS AD: 

20% OFF 

ALL SANDWICHES 



OPEN 11 A.M. tol A.M. 
7 DAYS A WEEK _ 




JOIN 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 




INTERESTED IN JOINING 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION? 

Complete this form and take It to... 

The Recreation Office, Room A1 38, 

Lifelong Education Center (LEC)I 

• • • 
Name 



Social Secniity Number 

Faculty Adviser (if known) 

Home Address Onclnde ZIP). 



_Cnrricnlnni_ 



Home Telephone Number w/Area Code_ 
Local Address 



Local Telephone Nnmber_ 



Comments (previons exeriencet; interests, etc.): 



Have a Say... Join SGA! 



12DSP©aiGHTDTiei*tJ. Scpl. 3. >»« 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Tuesday, Sept. 3 through Sunday, Sept. 8 
ACnVITIES 
Dince... 8:30 lo 11 p.m., tonight, Tuesday, Sept. 3, Susquehanna Room, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

MEETINGS 
Orck K... 3:30 p.m., today, Tuesday, Sept. 3, Room B107, Ufelong Educa- 
tion Center (LEC). - . •. d „ mm 
Gimnii EpjOoB Tio (GET)... noon, today, Tuesday, Sept. 3, Room BI07, 
Lifelong Education Center (LEC). „„ » j ■ 
United Way... 3:30 p.m. this Thursday, Sept. 5, Room 329, Academic 

Student Goyernmenl AuociaUon... all students interested in becoming 
senators, 4 p.m., today, Tuesday, Sept. 3, Room B107, Ufelong Education Center. 



Part-Time Employment 

Information supplied by personnel in the Advisement Center in the Learn- 
ing Resources Center Questions about listings should be directed to that office. 

Cook - Bull Run Inn, 605 Market St., Lewisburg, has an opening for a 
cook evenings and weekends. Apply in person. 

Lhe-in -- An opportunity for a student to live with an elderly person and 
do some work to assist this person. The compensation would be room and 
board. The residence is in MontoursviUe. Please contact Uwrence W. Emery Jr. 
in Room 157, Learning Resources Center. 

No experience necessary - Labels by Pulizzi, 505 Market St., 
Williamspon, has an opening for one or two students to work 20 to 25 hours a 
week assembling color samples. No experience necessary. Apply in person. 

EnTironmentil serrices aide - The WilUamsport Hospital, 777 Rural Ave., 
WiUiamsport, Pa. 17701, has an opening for an environmental services aide, 
part-time 7 to 3, weekends and holidays. Apply at the hospital's personnel 
department and refer to Job Posting #8010/RP018 #223. 




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The Future 

SPOTUGHT photos by URoy S. Whitmirt Jr. 
ThcM views of the constrnction site for (he Advanced Technology and Health Sciences Ctnler offer a hint u lo 
the size of the building of the fntore. The lS3,000-sqnire-foot building will enable the Coilege to offer virions high 
technology programs inclnding fiber opdcs, laser technology, aniomaled mannfictaring, compoler maintenance and 
repair, and Iclecommnnicitions. Dr. Robert L. Brender, College president, has noted that comprehensive, two-year 
training programs of this caliber art not offered at any other facility in the eastern United States. The completion date 
targeted b June 26, 1987. 



United Way rep 
to be on campus 
seeking volunteers 

Pete Carlin, associate director of 
the Lycoming United Way chapter, will 
conduct a meeting at 3:30 p.m., this 
Thursday in Room 329, Academic 
Center, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

He will talk to representatives of 
student organizations and other in- 
terested persons who want to help with 
the United Way Campaign (fund drive) 
in this residential area. 

Carlin will explain what the cam- 
paign is and the benefits of the United 
Way, Mrs. Fremiotti said. "Student 
organizations can use this as a com- 
munity project," she said, adding, "I 
am encouraging students to participate 
in this activity." 

Mrs. Fremiotti noted that there will 
be a follow-up training course on Thurs- 
day, Sept. 19, for those who volunteer. 

Heavy metal rock 
group to perform 
this Saturday 

The heavy metal rock group, 
Stranjerz, a newlv-formed area group, 
will perform from » p.m. to 10 p.m. this 
Saturday in the bandshell at Brandon 
Park, according to Mrs. GaU B. 
Landers, cultural coordinator for the 
Recreation Commission. 

Brandon Park is located at the in- 
tersection of Market and Hepburn 
Streets. However, Mrs. Landers sug- 
gests using the Washington Boulevard 
and Packer Street entrance. 

There is no raindate. There is 
limited parking. 

The concert is sponsored by the 
WilUamsport Recreation Commission; it 
is part of the series of programs to be 
held in the park, added Mrs. Landers. 



potlight"" 

Mondiy, Sept. 9, IMS • Vol. 21, No. 3 • 8 Paces 
Wiiliimiport Am Commmilty College • WilUimsport, Pi. 17701 

Class-action status applied to student's lawsuit over tuition 



Court ruling creates possibility for other students to join in the lawsuit 



A class-action status has been applied to a former 
College student's lawsuit concerning college tuition 
payments. The ruling opened the door for an estimated 
100 students to join as plaintiffs in the suit. 

The decision was handed down by Judge Thomas C. 
Raup in the Lycoming County Court House on Friday, 
Aug. 30 after deliberation of criteria which made evident 
that the claSs-action status is warranted. According to 
comment coincident with the announcement of the ruling, 
the judge was swayed by the number of similar cases and 
common legal issues as well as the expense of the litiga- 
tion. 

The ruling followed court arguments in the case of 
Terry Hasselman who sued the WiUiamsport Area School 
District to recover tuition she paid for attending more 
than four semesters at the CoUege. 

Prior to this year, the WiUiamsport district paid one- 
third of students' tuition costs for four semesters. 
Students were then responsible for payment of tuition for 
any additional credits or semesters. 

Earlier this year, the judge ruled that four-semester 
limitation was illegal and said adversely-affected students 
attending the College since September 1979 could sue the 



WiUiamsport Area School District. 

Since then, in addition to Hassehnan's suit, a score 
of other suits have been brought against the WUliamsport 
district and, according to WUliam J. Martin, dean of stu- 
dent services, several sinular suits have been filed against 
the MontoursvUle and South WiUiamsport school 
districts as weU. 

Dean Martin stated that he believes the court's deci- 
sion might benefit the affected students, particularly those 
who merit sponsorship. He said that in this case, the 
judge has ruled in the students' favor. He believes that in 
time this matter wiU be resolved, possibly in an out-of- 
court settlement. 

He also pointed out that the matter is out of the Col- 
lege's hands and that the problem exists between the af- 
fected student and his or her former sponsoring school 
district. 

Dean Martin is offering his assitance to students in 
resolving any questions concerning the issue. His office is 
located in Room 218, second floor of the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 

By Kathy L. Cobb 
Of The SPOTLIGHT staff 




WE'RE HAVIN' A HEAT 
WAVE... Seemed Ibal way last 
week when, despite the fad (he 
calendar read "September", 
temperatures soared to the high 
80s. Andrew i. Bower, elec- 
tronics itndenl from Mosquito 
Valley, was caplared by 
SPOTLIGHT photographer 
URoy S. Whilmlrt Jr. daring a 
breaii in front of the Academic 
Center. /SPOTLIGHT pholoj 



Next Week: The Tarly Warning System* 



ZoSPOTUGHTDMudar, Scpl. «, IMS 




12 13 W 15 • 
19 20 Jl a 23 ; 



KATHLEEN L. EISWERT 



t^t:^^ 




CYNTHIA E. A. HARTRANFT 




LtROY S. WHITMIRE JR, 






.•».<*T->v'--rt-'-:.- 



SUSAN R. KALLANSRUD 



LYLE A. WAGNER 



THEY BROUGHT YOU THE HRST 

Members of The SPOTLIGHT staff 
who were able to return to the campus ear- 
ly did so ID order to produce the first edi- 
tion of this academic year. Those staffers 
have been joined by other interested 
students who now are producing the stu- 
dent newspaper each week for distribution 
00 Mondays. 

SPOTLIGHT photos 
ByLeRoyS. Whitmire Jr. 




WANNA F. BROWN 



A pigeon shoot: 



Commenliry 
By URoy S. WUlmire Jr. 
Of The SPOTLIGHT stiff 




Last Labor Day morning, a friend called and asked me if I would like to go to a pigeon shoot in Hegins (20 
miles south of Shamokin). Since I have lived outside Lock Haven most of my life and the tradition was to go to the 
high-speed boat races that are held on the Susquehanna River, I decided to go to the pigeon shoot and break tradi- 
tion. 

Before hanging up the phone, I asked my friend: you mean clay pigeons don't you? No, he said: "real 
pigeons". Obviously he meant live pigeons. Well, I still thought he was pulling my leg. I figured- how can they 
get away with using live pigeons? 

As we arrived at the pigeon shoot, I reaUzed he wasn't joking. I thought: does the SPCA (Society for the 
Preventjon of Cruelty to Animals) know about this? I couldn't beUeve that nobody had started an environmental 
group to save these pigeons. 

There were four shooting areas to compensate for the number of participants. Each shooter would get four 
pigeons to shoot at, one at a time and one shot per bird. 

After watching for a couple of rounds, I had to admit that this could be fim. I'm ahnost certain that the 
residents of New York City would agree with me. 

Located in the middle of the shooting area were concession booths, games, beer and food stands I could 
sense the umty that existed among the people. This was their Labor Day tradition and they were proud to be a part 



WUI mother be a fullback? 



SPOTUGHTDMoalV, 8c»t. ), insoS 



By SDSf n R. KiUusnid 
Of Tbe SPOTUGHT SUff 

jEdilor's Note: In the news recently have 
been accounts of teen-aged girls seeking to take 
part in competitive sports - especially football 
- in their high schools. Comment from 
SPOTUGHT readers is invited and will be 
published next week if received b^ore noon 
tomorrow, Tuesday.] 



Who says girls can't play football? 

If you'd ask Rhonda Raubeson, a 
13-year-old girl from Augusta, Maine, 
she'd say: Nonsense! 

A 4-to-l vote by the Maine Human 
Rights Commission has decreed that 
Rhonda is permitted to play on any of 
the eight all-boy Lewistown Fly football 
teams. 

What kind of reaction is there to 
that at and around the Community Col- 



Dr. Roy R. Fontaine, instructor of 
psychology, said he feels there are no 
major psychological effects on the boys 
with whom she'll be playing. But, he 
added, it may change the way they feel 
about football. 

In regard to the decision made by 
the commission. Dr. Fontaine said, 
"Having a girl play football with a 
bunch of boys is probably altering the 



nature of the game." 

He added, "It may be an over- 
extension of the idea of equality." 

• • • 

Inasmuch as Rhonda is a part of 
the team. Dr. Fontaine beUeves the boys 
will act differently. "Some will treat her 
less rough and others will beat up on 
her." 

He said he feels there is enough dif- 
ference in strength to justify having girls 
and boys compete in separate games. 

Asked if he would have any pro- 
blem playing the game with a girl on his 
team, he rephed, "None." 

"Mixed sports are good, but I 
don't think they all need (to be) in- 
tegrated," he observed. 

• • • 

Ms. Donna R. Miller, associate 
professor of physical education, said 
she doesn't feel there will be any more 
danger that Rhonda Raubeson would 
become injured than there would be of a 
boy becoming injured if the girl is in 
good physical condition and stays in 
condition. 

"She's exposed to the same injuries 
as a boy - no more, no less," she said, 
observing, "organs are protected by 
muscle." 

When asked if a 13-year-old girl 
should play football. Ms. Miller said 



she felt it depended on the level of com- 
petition... the age of the athlete. It it 
were her daughter, she remarked, she 
would probably encourage her to play 
soccer. 

• • • 

Harry C. Specht, assistant pro- 
fessor of physical education, says "yes" 
to a girl playing football as long as it's 
what she genuinely wants to do and 
realizes all the intricacies of that par- 
ticular activity. 

Asked if he would want to play 
football with a girl on the opposing 
team, he said he felt it would change his 
style of play because he couldn't block 
or tackle in the same way he would a 
male. 

In regard to giving Rhonda 
Raubeson any leeway while playing, he 
said he thinks she should be ready to ac- 
cept all the responsibihty that goes with 
football. 

Specht is the father of two 
daughters and when asked if he would 
permit them to play football, he said, 
"Yes... I'd spend a lot of time explain- 
ing what they are getting into." 



Expressing a different point of 
view. Marc Senders, a computer science 
student from Marion, said, "I don't 



think it's right. If she wants to play 
football, she should be on a giris' team. 
I don't think a guy should beat up on a 
giri." 

As for having a girl on his team, 
Souders said it would make him uncom- 
fortable. He further stated that if she 
were on his team, he wouldn't tackle her 
the way he would a male opponent. 
"Giris should have their own team and 
guys should have their own," he com- 
mented. 

• • • 

From a teen-aged giri's point of 
view, Stacey Kinley, a Williamsport 
Area High School sophomore, said that 
Rhonda Raubeson should be allowed to 
play if she wants to and if her parents 
give their permission. 

Stacey said she would not be in- 
terested in playing football because she 
doesn't like the sport, but she said she 
feels girls shouldn't be treated any dif- 
ferently than boys. She said she also 
feels it's okay to intermix sports. 

• • • 

Is the Raubeson case the beginning 
of what lies ahead in sports? Will future 
generations pull out the high school 
yearbook, point to the football team 
picture, and say, "That's my mom... 
she was a fullback..." _^_«____^mm 



Study skill seminars 
scheduled to begin 
later this month 

A series of four seminars "designed 
to provide assistance to students with 
overall study skills problems" will begin 
later this month according to an an- 
nouncement from the College Advise- 
ment and Career Services Center. 

Students who wish to enroll in one 
of the seminars should sign up in the 
Advisement and Career Services Center, 
in Room 157, Learning Resources 
Center. 

Each seminar is scheduled for two 
evening meeting which will be one week 
apart. 



Today is last 
day to get ID 
before $10 fee 

Students are being reminded 
that today is the last day to have 
pictures taken without the $10 
processing fee, said Mrs. JoAnn 
R. Fremiotti, coordinator of Col- 
lege activities. 

The pictures will be taken to- 
day from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the 
Recreation Center, added Mrs. 
Fremiotti. 

"Returning students can get 
their identilication cards (IDs) 
validated throughout the 
semester," said Mn. Fremiotti. 



SPOTLIQHT 
Monday, S«pt 9. I9SS - Vol. 21, No. 3 

The SPOTUGHT is published each Monday momtng o( the academic year, ex- 
cept (or College vacations, by tournallsm and other Interested students of The 
Wllliamsporl Area Community College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1006 W. Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 
17701 Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Extension 221 



THE STAFF 

Wanna F. Brown, Oalana M. Caallabury, Kathy L. Cobb, ^athlMn L. 
Elswart, Catharlna A. Hannon, Cynlhia E. A. Hartranft, Bethany HachI, Kally S. 
Harrold, Suaan R. Kallanarud, Sandra L. Musgrava, Timothy F. Naldig, Llaa E. 
Sacrlat, Lyia A. Wagnar, LaRoy S. Whltmlra Jr. 

Faculty advtaar Anthony N. CItIo 



Meeting set for tomorrow for those 
interested in cross-country running 



A meeting will be held at 3:30 p.m. 
tomorrow in the classroom on the first 
floor of the Gymnasium for those who 
want to take part in cross<ountry runn- 
ing, according to PhiUip D. Landers, 
associate professor of business and 
cross-country mentor. 

The group, he emphasized, is for 
both men and women. "We are eligible 



for regional and national champion- 
ships," he added. 

The activity is for either com- 
petitiveness or recreation or both, he 
noted. 

Those who are interested but 
unable to attend the meeting may con- 
tact Landers in Room 307, Academic 
Center. 



'/ 



s 



Ij/VICIC 1 iS (^P^" 6 ".m. to midnight 

Monday thru Saturday 

(J) GRAND OPENING TODAY! 

^rJssD Brooklyn Style Eatery 




Z 



•A Unique Eating Experience 
•BEST Breakfast in town 
•Arcade and Pool Table 
•Daily Specials 



—..-.._ 234 Park St. Just across from 
PHONE ,. . , , . 

323- FOOD "'"' ^^^ parking lot 



4aSPOTUGHTDMoiidi7. Sept. 9, 1985 



ACROSS 
1 Royal 
6 Haughty 

1 1 Remem- 
brance 

12 Mistreats 

14 King ot 
Bashan 

15 Soil 

17 Rockfish 

18 Blockhead 
20 Transactions 

23 The sun 

24 Narrow, flat 
board 

26 Slumber 

28 Symbol for 
tantalum 

29 Weird 

31 Provided, 
prepared and 
served food 

33 Periods 
ottime 

35 Nerve 
network 

36 Declares 

39 Eel fisherman 

42 Parent: 
colloq 

43 Tasteless 
liquid food 

45 Rant 

46 Shoshonean 
Indian 

48 Exciting 
stories: 
colloq. 

50 Stilt 

51 Father 

53 Ivy League 
university 

55 Symbol for 
nickel 

56 Mistakes 
59 Courteous 

61 City In 
Germany 

62 Chairs 

DOWN 



CROSS 
WORD 
PUZZLE 



1 Feast 

2 Printer's 
measure 

3 Deity 

4 Dry 

5 Old musical 
instruments 

6 Mr Kettle 

7 Symbol tor 
rubidtum 

8 Possessive 
pronoun 

9 Employs 

10 Signify 

11 Member ot 
deer family 

13 Dinner 



16Soapstone 32 Kind of 

19 Journeys foot race 

forth 34 Portico 

21 Shakespeari- 36 Entertain 
an king 37 Sarcasm 

22 Mediter- 33 Agile 
ranean vessel 40 Occurrences 57 Note of scale 

25 Wearies 4 1 Bind again 58 Symbol for 

27 Mans name 44 Breaks tin 

30 Betimes suddenly 60 Pronoun 



47 Sins 

49 Wild plum 

52 Dawn 

goddess 
54 Guide's high 

note 



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1903 United FMturs Syndicate, Inc. 



WANTED: VEHICLES IN NEED OF TUNE-UP 
Wanted: Late model vehicles In need of tune 
up. Contact ttie service manager at ttie 
Automotive Trades Center, Room 11 9, or call Col- 
lege Ext. 432. [This announcement furnished by 
Lee E. Roush, replacement instructor, 
automotive.] 



BENSON 



€Mtn mini, ^ 
g^m market 



Corner of 3rcl and Maynard Sts. 




Snacks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 



ALWAYS OPEN - ALL NIGHT, HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



begii 



Secondary students 

in programs 
at main campus 

The vocational education secon- 
dary (high school) students have started 
their year at the College's main campus. 

There are currently 702 students in 
the various programs. 

The secondary vocational educa- 
tion programs include 14 areas in which 
students may get training. 

Those areas are auto body repair, 
auto mechanics, aviation, carpentry, 
cosmetology, drafting, electricjil con- 
struction, forestry, health assistant, hor- 
ticulture, machine shop, quantity foods, 
small engine repair, and welding. 

The cosmetology program is in 
conjunction with the Empire and the 
State Beauty Schools. 

Students in these programs are 
juniors and seniors in local and area 
high schools. The secondary program is 
rotated on a nine-week schedule. 
Seniors attend for the first nine weeks. 

Fontaine awarded 
doctorate during summer 

Dr. Roy P. Fontaine, instructor of 
psychology, received his doctorate in 
June, 1985 from the University of 
Georgia, Athens, Georgia 

His doctoral project involved the 
study and observation of monkeys in 
the jungles at Barro Colorado Island, 
near the Panama Canal. 

He also worked in the Monkey 
Jungle, Goulds, Fla. 

Dr. Fontaine has been teaching at 
the College for five years. He previously 
worked for the Dade County Public 
Schools System in Rorida. 

Dr. Fontaine is a native of Woon- 
socket, Rhode Island. 

Instructors given 
registration orientation 

Thirty non-credit instructors were 
given an orientation for the computer 
registration system at a meeting on 
Tuesday, Aug. 27, according to Mrs. 
Carol Kaufman, coordinator of Com- 
munity and Personal Development Pro- 
grams. 

The speaker for the meeting was 
Dr. James P. Rice, associate dean of 
educational advancement. 

Mrs. Barbara A. Danko, director 
of the Center of Lifelong Education, 
conducted the meeting. Additional in- 
formation was presented by Mrs. Carol 
Kaufman. 

The meeting was well received, 
noted Mrs. Kaufman, and was foUwed 
by refreshments and formal discussion. 

SHARE APARTMENT 
Large Bedrooin, Uving Room, 
Kitchen, Bath. $130 Monthly. 
Everything included - Even Cable TV. 
See Michael Shomaker, 869 Second 
Street, above Joe MIgnano's Sub Shop. 
ladvi.) 



FHSMO Club holds 
first session, names 
committee members 

The Food and Hospitality Manage- 
ment Student Organization met last 
Thursday for orientation of new 
students to the organization and to ap- 
point committees, according to a report 
furnished by Mrs. Vivian P. Moon, 
faculty adviser to the group. 

Kathy ZIockie, club president, ap- 
pointed the following committees: 

-To assign Big Brother/Big Sister 
pairs; Jean Warner, club treasurer, 
chairperson. 

-To make arrangements for a club 
breakfast mixer; Jean Warner, Lisa Kit- 
chen, Brenda Rice, and Lori Miller. 

-To compose a club handbook; 
Karen Daniels, club vice president will 
serve as chairperson and other members 
of this committee are Mike Banzhaf, 
Brad Robison, Regina Day, and Terri 
Berks. 

Chairperson for a Sept. 10 catering 
request is Mike Banzhaf. 

The club's executive committee will 
meet tomorrow to review 1985-86 plans. 
A parlimentarian, Keith Moyer, has 
been added to the list of officers. 

The group's next meeting will be at 
2 p.m., next Wednesday, Slept. 18, in 
Room 132B, Lifelong Education 
Center. 



Save Water! 
Check leaky 
faucets...! 



Olio's 

College 
Corner 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Phone 323-1321 

HOURS • Mon. thru Thurs. 
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Open for Breakfast 

ir ir ir 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 

Four winners 
every week 

• • • 

Your favorite Subs and 

Burgers the way you like 'em 

Come on over and gel 
somelhin ' good to eat! 



Sasqoehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 

The Susquehanoa Room's menu 
for the week starting today, Monday, 
Sept. 9, is presented as furnished by the 
Susquehanna Room management. 

Diilj Bretkful 
Scrambled eggs, 59'; hash browns, 55'; 
home fries, 55'; pancakes, $1.29; French toast, 
99'; waffles, 99'; sausage, 79'; Muffin Supreme, 
SI .09; Croissant Surprise, SI. 39; Colorado pita 
pocket, SI. 59. 

DtOy SiJad Bar 
Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomatoes, 
onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, 
bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple 
butter, Jello, potato salad, com relish. 

Today, Mondi;, Sept. 9 
Lunch 

Pork stir fry over rice, S2.59; BBQ chicken 
legs, potato and vegetable, S2.39. 
Soup 
Chicken rice or lentil. 
Dinner 
Chuckwagon omelet, bash browns, toast, 
S2.59; roast breast of turkey, gravy, potatoes, 
and vegetable, S2.S9. 

Sudwlchn 
Quarter pounder, SI. 25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; steak and cheese, SI. 79; grilled 
cheese and |)acon, S1.S9; turkey club, $1.79; 
French fries, 55'. 



more more more pick up with menu2 



Tnetdiy, Sept. 10 
Lnnch 

Spaghetti and sausage, Italian bread, 
$2.19; beef pot pie, vegetable, $2.59. 
Sonp 
Ham and bean, cream of broccoli. 

Dinner 
Baked fish, shrimp sauce, potato and 
vegetable, $2.79; roast pork, gravy, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.59. 

Sindwlches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, SI.49; beef salad in pita, $1.79; tuna 
salad, $1.59; taco, 99'; French fries, 55'. 

Wednndiy, Sept. 11 
Lnnch 

Franks and sauerkraut, $1.99; Swedish 
meatballs,poIatoes and vegetable, $2.19. 
Sonp 
Beef barley, tomato rice. 

Dinner 
Chicken and ribs, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.89; Jambalaya, potato, vegetable, $2.59. 
Sindwlcha 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
SI. 35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, SI.49; roast pork sandwich, $1.59; ham 
and cheese, SI.59; turkey, SI.59; French fries, 
55'. 

Thandar, Sept. 12 
Lnncb 

Shrimp quiche, small salad bar, $2.99; 
roast turkey breast, gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.39. 

Sonp 

Cream of mushroom, minestrone. 
Dinner 

Linguinc with red clam sauce, Italian 
bread, $2.89; Swiss steak, potatoes, vegetable, 
S2.89. Stndwkha 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; steak & cheese, $1.79; grilled 
cheese, 79*;shrimp salad, $1.79; French fries, 
55'. 



Phi Beta Lambda membership 
drive continues through Friday 



SPOTLIGHTDMondar, Sept. 9, I985a5 

D D D D D Employment Opportunities 

fEmployment opportunities listed here are presented as given by the College Placement Office, Room 157, Learning 
Resources Center. Questions should be directed to that office./ 

Program aides -- Hope Enterprises, 1536 Catherine St., WilUamsport, Pa. 17701 has openings for part-time program 
aides (20 hours a week) at $4.20 an hour. This might be used for an internship in the Human Services Program. Stop by |the 
Placement Office) and fill out an application. Would work evenings and weekends. 

Carpentry student - Carpentry student wanted for painting and remodeling. Call R&J Music, 326-2299. 

Admissions clerks - Divine Providence Hospital has openings for two part-time admissions clerks. Would be typing for 
computer input. One opening is for 1 1 p.m. to 7 a.m. every Wednesday and the same hours every other weekend. The other is 
for 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday. Apply at the hospital personnel office. 

Pizza person - Pudgies Pizza, 2028 Lycoming Creek Road, has part-time openings nights and weekends. Apply between 2 
and 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday. 

Apprenticeships - Local No. 44 Joint Apprentice Committee of Northeast Pennsylvania will be taking applications for ap- 
prenticeship in the sheet metal trade. More information is available in the College Placement Offic e. Room 157, Learning 
Resources Center. 

SGA Ice Cream 
Festival (urp!) 
'went very well' 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion Ice Cream Festival (sale) held last 
Thursday on the Academic Center lawn 
"went very well", according to Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities. 

Among those helping were Daria J. 
Beahm, aaccounting student from Beech 
Creek; Greg S. Lange, accounting and 
business management student from 
Lock Haven, and Scott D. Dickerson, 
graphic arts student and SGA senator 
from Easton. 

Most "customers" appeared to en- 
joy the occasion; the only complaint, 
according to Miss Beahm, was that the 
ice cream was melting quickly. The day 
of the sale was one of summer-like 
temperatures. 

Printers organization 
elects three College 
stcfff members as officers 

Courtesy College Iitformation Office 

Three members of the College staff 
have been elected as officers of the Sus- 
quehanna In-Plant Printers organiza- 
tion. 

Judith L. Demko, of Williamsport, 
was elected president. She is manager 
of the College's duplicating and mail 
services. 

Also elected were Fred C. Schaefer, 
also of Williamsport and assistant pro- 
fessor of graphic arts at the College, 
who was named first vice president 
(membership) and Harold L. Newton, 
of Williamsport and instructor of 
graphic arts, secretary-treasurer. 

Jerald J. Johnson, chief of produc- 
tion and service for SEDA-COG in 
Lewisburg, was elected second vice 
president (program). 

Susquehanna In-PIant Printers is a 
group of area printers organized to pro- 
mote in-plant production as a major 
part of the printing industry, to educate 
members in new technologies and foster 
understanding between printers, 
management, and support services. 



The Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) Fall 
membership drive now is underway and 
will continue through next Monday, 
Sept. 16, according to Paul W. 
Goldfeder, assistant professor of 
business administration and club ad- 
viser. 

Phi Beta Lambda is the largest 
business-oriented organization in the 
country and the local club at the College 
is starting its 16th year, the adviser said. 

AH business, computer science, and 
other business-related students are ehgi- 
ble to join. 

Interested students, he said, are be- 
ing urged by him and current members 
to pick up an application in the Phi 
Beta Lambda office in the Academic 
Center, lower level, Room 3, and 
should plan for many upcoming ac- 



tivities during the semester. 

Officers for this academic year are 
Ceylon S. (Lonnie) Reinard, business 
accounting student from Port Trevor- 
ton; Mark A. Cormier, business 
management student from Sinking Spr- 
ings, vice president; Brenda J. Wolfe, 
computer science student from Mon- 
toursville; Daniel L. Thorp, accounting 
student from Troy, treasurer; Richard 
L. Evans Jr., business accotmtisg stu- 
dent from Phiiipsburg, and Judy L. 
Brokaw, computer science student from 
Canton, administrative aides. 

The adviser said he and current 
members are also reminding students 
that soda and snacks are available for 
purchase in the PBL office, lower level 
of the Academic Center (Room 3). 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Clean, well-healed rooms available. Close lo College. 

Showers, Kitchen. 

S50.00 weekly includes complimentary breakfast and lunch. 

Contact Barry at 323-3663 or 327-1889 "f »• 234 Park Si. 

(Opposite east parking lot) 



^ Student Health ^ 
-k Insurance ^ 

student Health Insurance Forms 

are available in 

Health Services... Room 104, Gym 

Hours... 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Anyone who wishes to buy insurance 
must do so by Oct. 1 , 1 985 for this year. 



6DSPOTUGHTDMoidi;, Scpl. % IMS 

Conference on nuclear freeze to be held in city this weekend 



The fourth annual state conference 
presented by the Pennsylvania Cam- 
paign for a Nuclear Weapons Freeze 
will be held in Williamsport this Friday 
through Sunday, according to pam- 
phlets being circulated in the city. 



The conference, entitled 
"Challenge to Action" will be held at 
the Oenetti-Lycoming Hotel, West 
Fourth and William Streets in 
downtown WiUiafflsport, and in the 
Capitol Theater, on West Fourth Street 




HOBY'S HOAGIES and PIZZA 



"You Haven't Hod a Hoagie Until You've Hod a Hoby' 

FREE DEUVERY - Lirr.iled o.-o - Minimum Order $4,00 
STORE HOURS; 1 1 AM. to 1 AM, DAILY 



SUBS 

WHOLE 



HALF 

II 31 

SI M 



IIM 
(I U 
II J4 



COSMOS 



PITA POCKETS 



Tiidi*y 12. 1 



Chkfcwt Br*artt 

H0n«>dTwrii«y 

SALADS 



BEVERAGES 



^/WVV^AA/WVWrtrt/SA/V^^W^/lrt/VWVVVVVVV^ftfVVVVSAftfliVVVVUVV, 



GRAPHIC ARTS STUDENTS 

PLEDGE WEEK IS NOW!! 

Sept. 9 through Sept. 13 




GAMMA EPSILON TAU 

Graphic Arts Fraternity 

Inleresled Graphic Arts SlndtoU... S« Any of Thne Oflictrs: 

Scoll D. Diclcrsoii • PrtsidtDl 

Snsiii M. Ale • Vict Pmidcnl 
Miijirel L. Bimbtrt • Swreliiy 
Jimts D. Wither 3rd • Tmsorcr 

8 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

in the area of Mr. Metzker's room 

in the Academic Center 



near the hotel. 

The conference features various 
panel discussions and kepote ad- 
dresses. 

A variety of workshops is also 
scheduled. Among them are workshops 
on "Non-Violence: Our Means and 
Ends", "Targeting the Arms Race in 
Our Community", and "Organizing for 
Social Change" - among others. 

The Pennsylvania Campaign for A 
Nuclear Weapons Freeze is a project of 
the Pennsylvania Council of Churches. 

The PCANWF office is located in 
Hairisburg. 

'Jlie Circulator' makes 
debut appearance 

'The Circulator', a newsletter 
prepared by the College Library and 
Media Center, distributed for the first 
time as the Fall semester began. 

The simply-stated goal of the new 
newsletter is to keep faculty and staff in- 
formed about services available from 
the Learning Resources Center. 

The first issue - Volume 1, No. 1, 
dated August 1985 - included notes 
about the Media Center and changes be- 
ing made there and a presentation of in- 
formation sources for those interested in 
microcomputers. 

'The Circulator' will be published 
on an as-needed basis. 



Reservations due today 
no later than 4:30 p.m. 
for Hiawatha river cruise 

Reservations will be accepted until 
4:30 p.m. today for the College Staff 
Cruise aboard the Hiawatha river pad- 
dleboat, according to Ms. Nancy J. 
Schick, secretary to the dean of student 
services. 

The cruise is intended primarily for 
employees of the College. 

the paddleboat sails at 3:30 p.m. 
tomorrow and returns at 7:30 p.m. 
Passengers may board at 4:30. 

Interested persons should contact 
Mrs. Judith L. Demko, Duplicating and 
Mail Services, for additional informa- 
tion, Ms. Schick said. 

The College's Food and Hospitali- 
ty Club will cater the cruise. However, 
Ms. Schick said, people who wish to br- 
ing their own refreshments may do so. 




X-C/Runners 

Men • Women 
Competitive • Recreational 

(We are eligible for 
regional and national championships) 



FIRST MEETING 

TOMORROW 

TUESDAY, SEPT. 10 

3:30 P.M. 

First Floor Classroom, Gym 



II unable to attend, contact.. 
Phil Landers, Room 307, Academic Center 



SPOTUGHTaMoida;, Sept. «, inSD? 



College team to vie this weekend 
in Paul Bunyan Competition 



A six-person team, one alternate 
(seven students) and Richard W. 
Rankinen, associate professor of forest 
technology and adviser for the group, 
will be attending the Carroll County 
Paul Bunyan Competition (a woodsman 
meet). 

The woodsman meet will be held 
this Sunday, Sept. 15 at the Carroll 
County Farm Museum in Westminster, 
Md., according to Rankinen. He added 
that the group will travel down this 
Saturday. 

"Participants must be a member of 
the College but need not be in the forest 
technology program," said Rankinen. 

This is the first year the Forest 
Technicians Association has attended 
this meet. 

The group will be joining the col- 
legiate competition which consists of 
teams from surrounding colleges. There 
will be trophy prizes for the winners of 
the events. 

The woodsman meet will include 
Jack and Jill crosscut sawing (male and 
female team), making one complete cut; 
two-man crosscut sawing, malting two 
complete cuts in a 10x10 yellow poplar 
(a type of wood); underhand speed 
chopping, participants stand on the 
wood that they are chopping and chop it 
in two; standing block speed chop, 



chopping a piece of wood off a vertical 
piece of wood; an ax throw; log rolUng; 
chain saw event, participant has to 
make a certain number of cuts in a 
square piece of wood (a cant); tobacco 
spitting; and i pole cUmb, a timed event 
where whoever gets to the top first and 
rings the bell wins. 

"This event is similar to a Boom 
Festival event that was held Aug. 17 
through Aug. 25," said Rankinen. 

Further information is available 
from Richard W. Rankinen at College 
Ext. 8-35 or at (717)-547-1661. 



Race Across States 
to begin tomorrow 

"The Race Across the States" will 
begin at 4 p.m. tomorrow, according to 
Robert A. Young, Recreation Center 
assistant. 

During the race, participants walk, 
nm, jog, bike, or swim. A participant 
does not have to do all. 

Information about intramurals is 
available in the Recreation Center Of- 
fice, Room A137, Lifelong Education 
Center, in the New Week News, in 
Room 108 in the Gymnasium, and, of 
course, in The SPOTLIGHT, he said. 



Phi Beta Lambda 
JOIN NOW! 

National Business Organization 

Students in Business, Business Computer Science and 

Business Elective Courses are eligible. 

Membership Drive for Fall Term 




.#^ 



.^" good news 
Pi3aa 




EXPANDED 
DELIVERY SERVICE 



"Pudgie's Delivers 
Tonight" 

^FAST 



LtOL-" 



ALL DAY FREE DELIVERY 

322-4746 or 322-4747 

WILLIAMSPORT • 912-922 Washington Blvd. 

Please indicate 'Coupon' 
When Ordering Your Delivery 



rPiidgic's Pi33a 

Giant Party Pizza 

Only $6.69 

'^j^Pudgies Pi33a 
^J Large or Deep Dish Cheese Pizza 

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SMALL • tin LARGE • SSM 



SoSPOTUGHTOMDndajr, Sept. 9, 1915 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Sept. 9 through Sunday, Sept. 15 



AcnvmES 

Phi Beta Lambda recruitment... today through Sept. 16, recruiting new 
members, Academic Center foyer. 

MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., this Wednesday, Sept. 11, Room 
218, Academic Center. 

Circle K... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 10, Room BI07, Lifelong 
Education Center (LEC). 

Gamma Epsilon Tau (GET)... noon, tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 10, Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center. 



Multi-Cultural Society... 11:30 a.m., this Thursday, Sept. 12, Room 159, 
Learning Resources Center (LRC); organizational meeting; all interested students 
welcome to attend. 

Student Government Association... Senate, 5 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 
10, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center (LEG). 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

WWAS Radio... WWAS-88FM, the College student-operated radio sUtion, 
begins broadcasting the 198S-86 academic year today, Monday, Sept. 9. 

Le Jeune Chef... Le Jeune Chef, student-operated restaurant in the Lifelong 
Education Center, begins luncheon service next Wednesday, Sept. 18. 



By Bethiny Hecbt 
Of The SPOTLIGHT lUff 

This year's first major social event on campus took 
off with a hop, skip and a jump - and many other 
movements of a dancing nature. 

This debut dance was held last Wednesday in the 
Susquehanna Room on the main campus and was spon- 
sored and engineered in its entirety by the Student 
Government Association and the staff of WWAS-88FM, 
the College's student-operated radio station. 

The aifair kicked off at 8:30 p.m. At first, the 
turnout was small: potential dancers anxiously awaiting 



to see just who would make the first move toward the -as 
yet - empty dance floor. 

But before long, two brave souls took the plunge and 
in the blink of an eye - or the shake of a leg ~ the floor 
became one grinding, happy animal. 

A final head<ount for estimated attendance set the 
figure at at least 300. 

WWAS-88FM was broadcasting live from the scene. 
The consensus was that the sound system, music selec- 
tion, and performance were first<lass. Presiding disc 
jockey Brian Hill was very optimistic about future ven- 
tures of this sort... When wiU the next dance be? Accor- 
ding to Hill, it'll be "soon!". 



About 300 attend 
SGA-WWAS dance 



Enrollment down about 12 percent; 
president reviews implications 



Special late report 

By Kilhy L. Cobb 

or The SPOTLIGHT iliff 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, reported up-to-date figures 
concerning the current enrollment status 
at the College during the monthly 
meeting of the College Board of 
Trustees last Thursday. 

His report, including one of Dr. 
William J. Martin, dean of student ser- 
vices, slated that enrollment for the 
1985-86 term is about 12 percent lower 
than enrollment for the Fall 1984 
semester. 

Dr. Breuder stated that the decUne 
is the first since 1973. He also said that, 
in 1984, the College was the only com- 
munity college in Pennsylvania to show 
increased enrollment. 

He said he felt that the dechne was 
due to several factors: improved 



employment situations on a local and 
nationwide basis, impact of the sponsor- 
ship issue, and higher tuition costs to 
students from sponsoring districts. 

While this decline might appear to 
have negative imphcations. Dr. Breuder 
stated that the situation is hopeful 
because the 12 percent figure is 
reportedly lower than figures on file 
from March 1985 when the College suf- 
fered a 48 percent enroUment loss. 

Dr. Breuder said that if the College 
is unable to recover over $1.5 million in 
revenue lost from the decline, or if 
enrollment does not increase, the Col- 
lege will be forced to cover the losses 
by dipping into other budgets ~ even 
stipend money earmarked for reducing 
student tuition costs. 

He stated that if enrollment were to 
hold at the 12 percent deficit and the 
budget were brought into balance, such 
an extreme action might be avoided. 



■ ^^ Men. if you're 

P ^^ within one month of 

^^ your 18th birthday. 

^ It s time to register 

with Selective Service. 

It s simple. Just go down to your local 

post office, fill out a card and hand It 

to a postal clerk. 



Register. 

If s Quick. It's Easy. 

And it's the Law. 



WWAS-88FM begins broadcasting 
today; hours are 8 to midnight 



WWAS, the College student- 
operated radio station will begin broad- 
casting today at 8 a.m., according to 
Ms. Janie K. Swartz, mass communica- 
tions instructor and faculty adviser for 
student radio WWAS-88FM. 

Station hours will be from 8 a.m. 
until midnight, Monday through Fri- 
day. The format for the Fall semester is 
as follows: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Top 40; 4 
to 6 p.m., a combination of jazz, 
classical, and raggae, and from 6 to 10 
p.m., rock and roll. 

This year's staff mcludes Michael 
A. Wright, of Shickshinny, general 
manager; Dennis E. Wilston, of Can- 
ton, assistant general manager; Brian J. 
Hill, of Montgomery, operations direc- 
tor; Rodney J. DiStasi, of Williamsport, 
program director; Karen S. Ludwig, of 
Trout Run, music director; Craig L. 
Hower, of WiUiamsport, news director; 
Vincent V. Ceccacci, of Ulysses, sports 



director; James G. Heck, of Kane, pro- 
duction and PSA director; Frank J. 
(Pete) Nierle, of WiUiamsport, promo- 
tion director; Denise A. Bonomo, of 
Pitman, public affairs director; Darla 
M. Lutcher, of Montandon, personnel 
director. 



If you're not '§ 




B 


V 




e« 


^^ 


^ 


O 




§: 

B 




don't pour it! 




'^^VW^Sfl^ftftrtrtrt^V^^^irtrtrtJVW^ftrt/Vli^rt^S^V 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

CORNER OF 2nd & MAYNARD 

PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 



Hours: Mon.-Sat. II a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Sun. 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Daily Specials 



Regular Sub 

Meatball 

Turkey 

Ham 

Tuna 

Cheese Steak 



Whole $1.60 
Whole $1.75 
Whole $1.40 
Whole $1.80 
Whole $1.70 
Whole $2.50 



^^^'^''''''''^'•'^ ^ ''^^'•''•''''^^'''VV,^i/VV^^^ 



Early Warning 
System... 
...See Page 4 




i^ACC ARCH/Vi 



POTLIGHT 



SPOTLIGHTIng 

Dr. Martin 

...See Page 6 



Moada;, Sept. li, IMS • Vol. 21, No. 4 • I Pitn • WllUuupoit Ant ConmiDlt; Collctc • WnUunpoil, Pa. 177*1 



College featured in national periodicals; 
Advanced Tech Center wins award 



With the new Advanced 
Technology and Health Sciences Center 
designed and under construction, the 
College is receiving profuse recognition 
on a local and national basis, according 
to College officials. 

Although only part of the founda- 
tion has thus far been laid for the 
Center, pubUcations with national and 
international circulation have already 
begun to appreciate and anticipate the 
College's advancement in proportion, 
design, and academic offerings. 

Feitored in two pcriodicib 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, has announced that two 
periodicals will feature the new Center, 
accenting the design of the building, new 



programs, and services offered through 
the building. 

In addition, the magazines will of- 
fer information on how the Center will 
help to improve the economic vitality of 
Lycoming County, aid business and in- 
dustry to change and meet new 
demands, and eventually attract new 
business and mdustry. 

Community and Junior College 
Journal will feature the Center in its Oc- 
tober/November issue. It has a circula- 
tion of about 50,000 nationally. 

Viewpoint, a periodical published 
by the IBM Company, will pubUsh an 
article in late winter 1983-1986. The 
publication has a circulation of about 
130,000 in the United States and 



Europe. A freelance writer and 
photographer have visited the campus to 
prepare ttie story. 

Award received 

In addition to the coverage in the 
periodicals, the architectural firm 
rersponsible for designing the Center 
has received recognition for the design 
of the building. 

Hayes, Large, Suclding, Fruth, and 
Wedge, based in Altoona, was 
presented with an annual award by the 
Pennsylvania Art Commission. 

Dr. Breuder also discussed the 
renovation of the Technical Trades 
Center - which was scheduled to be 
completed Sept. 17. 



Fnll capacity eipected 

Workers have attempted to com- 
plete the project within a three month 
time period - and effort Dr. Breuder 
has termed "impossible". The area be- 
ing regenerated is approximately 30,000 
square feet in size. 

The project suffered some minor 
inconveniences relative to scheduUng 
and teaching classes in that area. 
Materials were shifted around to ac- 
comodate the time overrun. The 
building is m use at this time and is ex- 
pected to be utilized to its full capacity 
next month, according to Dr. Breuder. 

Dr. Breuder commented on the 
College's progress and success: "I think 

■■■ Please turn lo Page 8 



»&&, 




'Cuff 'em 

May be a bit onanial -the 
handcnffs secnring the bike to the 
bike rack, that \s. Bat it IS one 
way to try to fend off bike 
mstien. This pictore was taken 
early this semester on main cam- 
pus. [SPOTLIGHT photo by 
Timothy F. NeidigJ 



Le Jeune Chef 
grand opening 
this Wednesday 



Report contributed 

The grand opening of Le Jeune 
Chef will be this Wednesday. The 
student-operated restaurant will be open 
for the public Mondays through 
Wednesdays and on Fridays from II 
a.m. to I p.m. 

Le Jeune Chef is located at the 
southside of the lobby in the Lifelong 
Education Center, next to the Sus- 
quehanna Room. 

Featured are gourmet entrees such 
as chicken cordon bleu, or shrimp 
scampi, various soups, sandwiches, and 



salads. The a la carte menu includes 
"old favorites" such as the Monte 
Cristo Sandwich, the club sandwich, 
and French fries. 

The newest item on the menu is a 
"Ught luncheon". 

Reservations are preferred, but 
walk-ins are welcome, according to the 
student managers of the restaurant. 

Reservations are taken from 8 a.m. 
to 2 p.m. on College Ext. 369. Callen 
are asked to ask for Ms. Judith 
Patschke or Dr. Cynthia Schloss. 



Menn for Wednetday 

The scheduled menu for this 
Wednesday includes: 

Light luncheon - marinated beef 
salad platter, roll, beverage, $2.25. 

Special for the day - pork and 
shrimp egg rolls, steamed rice with 
scaUions, broccoli Normandy with but- 
ter sauce, rolls, beverage, J3.50. 

Soup du jour - egg drop soup, 65 
cents a cup and 80 cents a bowl. 

Desserts - assorted pies, 65 cents; 
marble cheese cake, 80 cents; Montage 

■■■ Please turn lo Page S 



2aSPOTUGHTDMudar, Stpl. li, IMS 

Whaddya' 
say...? 




Are you an adult? 

By LyI* A. Wignar 
Of Th* SPOTLIGHT StlH 

I need to speak with you about an 
Important matter. It seems amazing 
that In an Institution of higher learning, 
one would encounter gross acts of 
uncleanllness. It's my college work 
study (CWS) job to be part of the 
custodial staff. This Includes cleaning 
classrooms, vacuuming halls, and 
sweeping and mopping stairways. 

While completing these chores, I 
have frequently found cigarette butts, 
chewing gum, and chewing tobacco 
-not ]ust thrown on the floors, but spit 
Into the corners of the stairwells. 

Why anyone would spit chewing 
tobacco Into a corner Is beyond me. It 
Is most tasteless and Inconsiderate of 
others. Yet, what really amazes me Is 
that spitting and throwing of butts on 
the floor Is being done by those who at- 
tend W.A.C.C. or have business on the 
premises. 

We have a beautiful college with 
lots of nice carpeting and attractive 
landscaping which people are 
carelessly abusing. 

If you should see someone com- 
mitting these atrocities, please bring It 
to their attention that It Is most unadult 
to perform such acts. 

Iilaybe we can persuade them to 
change their thoughtless ways. 



[Whaddya' say...? is a regular 
feature of The SPOTLIGHT. Opmions 
are collected at random and are the 
opinions ol the individuals quoted.] 



Photos and interviews 
ByLeRoyS. Whitmire Jr. 
Question: The idea of testing high 
school students for drug use has 
recieved attention recently In the 
media. If illegal drugs are present in the 
student's system, the student would be 
denied admittance to the school until 
the problem was eliminated. 
What Is your opinion? 




Michael J. Stanzlone, ad- 
ministrative assistant for secondary 
programs, from Wllllamsport; "Basical- 
ly, there are better ways to solve the 
problems for the fact that testing 
students for drug use would cause ten- 
sion between students and administra- 
tion." 

From my desk 

[From my desk Is written by 
members of The SPOTLIGHT staff 
who wish to share individual ideas on 
particular sub/ects. Opinions express- 
ed are those ol the Individual writers. 
Reader response is welcome.] 




Beth L. Seltzer, business manage- 
ment student from Pine Creek: "Not 
the whole population... only If It is ob- 
vious." 




Andrea P. Braim, human services 
student from Linden: "I disagree. If It 
does not interfere with the students' 
studies they shouldn't be kept out of 
school." 



Kathy M. Rogers, food and 
hospitality student from Wllllamsport: 
"Yes, if there Is reasonable proof that 
the student Is abusing drugs." 



Using the elevator: 
How about those who need it? 

in the Academic Center there has recently been a major Inconvenience 
for the handicapped and for individuals with health problems. 

Ivls. Kathryn A. Ferrence, counselor for special needs students, said last 
week she has had several complaints from handicapped persons who were 
not able to obtain the elevator when they needed to get to their classes. 

Since the handicapped can't get an elevator, they have to walk up and 
down several flights of stairs, she said. 

The reason that the handicapped can't get elevator Is because healthy 
students are using It, she said. 

lulost of the students are probably not aware that they are creating a pro- 
blem, she added. 

There are not enough elevators for everyone to use, she said, so it would 
be a good idea for healthy students to use the stairs. 

Students should be aware that whenever they use an elevator, they may 
be depriving a handicapped person of a service that that person needs t6 get 
to class. 




„.Ji^ 

Zola, air refrigeration 
technology student from Hazelton: 
"Definitely not. If would be against the 
students' constitutional rights." 




Kim Bordner, computer science 
student from Trevorton: "Absolutely 
not... unless they find the student lying 
on the floor somewhere. 



Letters 



Leitars to the editor md SPOTUGHT 
readers may be delivered to ftoom 7, basement, 
Academic Center. Letters must be received 
betore noon ol the Tuesday preceding the lulon- 
day ol Intended publication. 



Crossword to return 

The crossword puzzle which has 
been a regular feature of The 
SPOTLIGHT will return soon. Mean- 
while, we hope readers enjoy the 
"word search" series of puzzles. 



To the Editor: 

All of the colleges I visit in the 
state of Pennsylvania in the capacity of 
State Phi Beta Lambda adviser have a 
weekly or dally school newspaper. 

in looking at papers at the different 
schools, I can't help comparing them to 
the SPOTLIGHT. This paper has all the 
Information our students and ad- 
ministrators need. In a word, it's 
wonderful. 

Congratulations to the adviser, 
staff, and reporters who put out the 
SPOTLIGHT. 

Piul W. Qoldfeder, 

•tslitant profaieor, 

and advlter, Phi BeU Lambda 



'the fine touch' 

By Bethany Hecht 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Review of the movie, 
'Back to the Future' 

Want to see a fast, fun, and 
thoroughly enjoyable sci-fl comedy? 

Then rush to see "Back to the 
Future", starring Family Ties' Michael 
J. Fox and Taxi's loveable burn-out 
Christopher Lloyd. 

Fox's performance proves that he 
is Indeed one of the rising new stars of 
the screen and Lloyd's portrayal of a 
brilliant, eccentric Inventor Is superb. 

The dialogue is snappy, the action 
Is tight, and the characters are very 
credible. 

The supporting oast Is first-rate. 
The setting is so authentic that this 
movie has the feel of a period piece. 

And, permeating all, is the fine 
touch of Steven Spielberg, executive 
producer. 



SPOTLIOHT 
Monday, SapL 16, Itas - Vol. 21, No. 4 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday momlna of the academic year ex- 
cept tor College vacations, by loumallsm and other Interested students of The 
Wllllamsport Area Community College. 

.,■,21"'^°^ ."J"'" '• *'=«<'»"'l': Center. 1005 W. Third St., Wfllllamsport Pa 
17701. Telephone: (717) 326-3781. Extension 221. 

Opinions expressed are those of the student newspaper or of those whose 
names accompany items. Opinions do not reflect official opinion of the institution. 

The SPOTLIGHT Is a member ol 
the Columbia ScholastJc Press Association 

THE STAFF 
n»» r""!!!, ""Z?"^"' °"'*"* " CMlLbury. Kathy L. Cobb, C.ttwln. A. Hin- 
^i 1!1, ,* L ,. "•?'""■ B«th.ny H.cht, K.lly S. H.rrold, Suun R. Kalian- 
Uin^'-'^ M ^''?''.^^'"' '•• "''•»'•»•• Timothy F. N*ldlg, LiM E. S«:rlat, 
MIndy ShaHar, Lyia A. Wagn.r, LaRoy S. Whitmira Jr. 
Faculty advlaar Anthony N. Clllo 



Two faculty members receive awards; 
building update given by director 



SPOTLIGHTDMoidir, Sept. li, 1M5d3 



Last Monday evening, the Society 
of Manufacturing Engioeers (SME), 
Local Chapter No. 49, assembled for its 
monthly (Unner-business meeting in Le 
Jeune Chef, the on<ampus, student- 
operated restaurant. 

While the group usually meets at 
the downtown Sheraton Hotel, it 
gathered at the College this month to 
discuss the anticipated success of the 
new Advanced Technology and Health 
Sciences Center which now is under con- 
struction. 

Dr. Btker speaks 

The meeting was conducted by 
Chapter Chairman Todd J. McCoy, a 
draftsman at Keeler/Dorr/Oliver. Dr. 
George L. Baker, director of the Col- 
lege's Industrial Technology Division, 
was guest speaker. Dr. Baker is one of 
the key persons responsible for the 
development of the Center. 

Dr. Baker discussed the immense 
size of the center, grants awarded to the 
College for purchase of expensive, in- 
novative educational equipment, and 
the many diverse programs of study 
which will be available through the 
center. 

He stated, "The president of the 
College has been extremely supportive. 
No other community college in the area 
has access to a facility like this." 

Statewide attraction expected 

He said he expects secondary 
students from around the state to enroU 
in many of the new programs. He men- 
tioned that the machine shop program is 
one of the few which did not lose any 



students this semester. 

Two faculty members at the Col- 
lege received recognition for their par- 
ticipation in the organization. 

J. Thomas Livingstone, assistant 
professor, machine tool technology, 
received an award for excellence in- 
programming. Livingstone is program 
chairman for SME. 

Chalmer C. Van Horn, associate 
professor of drafting, received an award 
for his active participation in the 
chapter. 

Bosineuman honored 

Local businessman, Peter Myers, 
of Litton Industries, was also presented 
an award for his work with the 
organization. 

The meeting concluded with a tour 
of existing College facilities and viewing 
of various equipment. 

The local chapter of SME first met 
in 1942. Currently, about 65 of its 
members are students from the College. 

The organization offers services 
such as educational training in the form 
of films, handbooks, seminars on a 
local and national basis. SME has 
chapters all over the United States and 
in 70 other countries, according to Liv- 
ingstone. 

Livingstone stated that students 
may join the organization for a fee of 
$10 a year. Interested students may con- 
tact him at his office in the Metal 
Trades Center, Room 104, or contact 
Van Horn in Room 218, Lifelong 
Education Center. 




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INSTRUCTORS HONORED ~ J. Thomai LiYinptone, asditant professor of 
midline tool technology, at left, and Chalmer C. Van Horn, associate pro- 
fessor of drafting, were honored at recent meeting of local chapter of Society 
of Mannfactoring Engineers (SME). [SPOTLIGHT photoj 



ABC BOWLING LANES 

1245 Park Avenue (at Rose St.) 
College League Sign-Ups 

Men, Women, or Mixed 
Four Persons per Team 

Sign Up & Start Sept. 17 at 4 P.M. 
Price $3.00 Free Shoes 




Phone 326-2885 for more information 

Free Trophies and Banquet 
Provided by ABC Bowling Lanes 



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Early warning cards to be used 



New method set to give academic alert 



According to Dr. William J. Martin, dean 
of student services, will Institute a new method of 
notifying students of unsatisfactory academic 
progress. This program, labelled the Early War- 
ning System, will go into effect during the third 
or fourth week of the semester. 

Students who are experiencing difficulty 
with course content, poor study skills, attitude 
or attendance, or any other problem identified 
by individual instructors will receive the light 
blue "Early Warning Card" indicating a D 
(deficient) or F (failing) grade. 

The purpose of the notification Is to make 
the student aware, the dean said, of his current 
academic status well before midterm warnings so 
that he or she might investigate the various 
resources available. 



Help is ivtllable 

To assist students who are suffering from 
academic deficiencies, the College is making 
available the following resources: 

-- The Tutoring Lab, Room 161, Learning 
Resources Center, offers one-on-one tutorial 
support as a supplement to classroom instruc- 
tion. 

- The Learning Lab for Independent Study 
in the Library offers use of individualized study 
aids in English, mathematics, reading, and study 
skills. 

-The Advisement and Career Services 
Center, which will offer a series of four Study 
Skills Seminars designed to provide assistance to 
students with overall study skills problems such 
as note-taking, lest preparation, studying and 
time management. 



Scmlnir dale), dmei liited 

The seminars are conducted in two sessions a 
week apart. Each session meets from 4:30 to 6 
p.m. 

The seminars are scheduled for Mondays, 
Sept. 23 and Sept. 30; Tuesdays, Sept. 24 and 
Oct. 1; Wednesdays, Sept. 25 and Oct. 2, and 
Thursdays, Sept. 26 and Oct. 3. 

Dr. Martin said he is urging any student 
who receives the Early Warning Card to sign up 
for participation in this program. He added that 
he felt that any other students who have weak 
study skills might also wish to attend. 

He said the sessions are being offered at no 
cost to any student; attendance will not be taken. 

Not 1 'negidve eipcrience' 

Dr. Martin slated, "We don't want this to 
be a negative experience for the student. We 
want it to be a good experience for both the stu- 
dent and the collective administration... to get 
the student and his studies back on a better 
track. 

"Students should view their participation in 
this program as a good chance to remediate their 
studies problems. We want to help students stay 
in school." 

For the seminars, students should sign up 
with Mrs. Catherine M. Shaffer, Room 157, (the 
Career Center), Learning Resources Center. 

Conducting the sessions, in addition to Dr. 
Martin, will be Lawrence W. Emery, director of 
counseling, career development and placement, 
and Dean R. Foster, director of developmental 
studies. 



Research ildlta leinlnir offered 

In conjunction with the Study Skills 
Seminars, the Learning Resources Center staff 
will be offering Library Research Skills 
Seminars. 

These sessions are scheduled: 
Tuesdays, Sept. 24 and Oct. 1, 3 to 4 p.m.; 
Wednesdays, Sept. 25 and Oct. 2, 4:30 to 5:30 
p.m., and Thursdays, Sept. 26 and Oct. 3, 7 to 8 
p.m. 

The sessions are to be conducted by Mrs. 
Marilyn G. Bodnar, reference librarian, and 
Mrs. Ann E. Gibson, library technician. 

The sessions will offer basic information 
such as the organization of library materials, use 
of periodicals, and operation of audio-visual 
equipment. 

Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, Learning Resources 
Center director, said, "This program will be 
particularly useful to EngUsh students, bit it is 
open, of course, to students in any course of 
study." 
Sign up in the Library 

Students may sip up in the Library for any 
session. Questions about the sessions may be 
directed to Mrs. Hickey or Mrs. Bodnar in the 
Library, Mrs. Hickey said. 

College administrators have designed these 
programs to coincide with the release of the Ear- 
ly Warning Card, Dr. Martin said, adding, so 
that students might remediate their academic 
situations before it becomes too late in the 
semester. 

Although Early Warning Cards will be 
issued fairly early in the semester, the College 
will continue to dispatch midterm warnings dur- 
ing the eighth week of school. 



RIDE NEEDED 
I am looking for a ride from 
HaghesTiUe to W.A.C.C. Monday 
through Thursday mornings. Cliis 
starts at 8 a.m. Leave i note with yonr 
name and nomber for Lyie Wagner at 
(he SPOTLIGHT office. Room 7, 
AGO basement, fadvll 



FOR SALE 
Keystone XL200 Silent Movie 
Camera. Snper 8 (mil). Features: Elec- 
tric Eye Control, Minoai Zoom Lens. 
Good Condition. Price Negotiable. 
Call John at 327-1416 during the day 
nntil 6 p.m. or Saturdays, [advtl 




PHONE 
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One coupon per customer. Cany out only. At participating locations, h 



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Welcome College Students 

Court & Willow Cale 

326 Court Street 

322-0135 



Lunch • Dinner • Sunday Brunch (10:00-2:00) 

Gourmet Soups • Deli Sandwiches & Salads 

Homemade Desserts • Imported Beer 

20% Discount with I.D. 

Good Ihni Sept. 22, 1985 




Yearbook workshop to be held 
on main campus next week 



SPOTUCHTDMndir, 8<pt. li, inSoS 



"Yearbookability '86", a Herff 
Jones yearbook workshop for high 
schools and other schools in the area 
will be held at the College next Tuesday. 

This year's workshop is the 12th 
annual one to be sponsored by the year- 
book company. Charles H. Bollinger, 
of Jersey Shore, is workshop director. 
On campus, Anthony N. Cillo, faculty 
adviser to The SPOTLIGHT, is coor- 
diBator. 

Each year in the past, the 
workshop has attracted several hundred 
students who were part of their high 
school, private school, or junior college 
yearbook staffs. 

This year's workshop will feature 
opening remarks and a welcome to the 
Community College by Dr. Daniel J. 
Doyle, director of the Integrated Studies 



Division. 

Conducting sessions during the day 
will be Tom James, northeast regional 
sales manager; Joe Hughes, customer 
service manager from Gettysburg; John 
Sullivan, creative services director; Mrs. 
Carol Gillman, composition supervisor 
from Gettysburg; Tom Chaffee, finan- 
cial consultant from Erie, Al Oussoren, 
graphic consultant from Gettysburg; 
Ms. Sue Craig, adviser to Rugged Cub, 
State College; Jon Lundell, customer 
service from Gettysburg, and a 
representative of Davor Photo, Ben- 
salem. 

Assisting Cillo will be Susan R. 
Kallansrud, a journalism student from 
Williamsport, who is student chairman 
of the yearbook workshop liaison com- 
mittee. 



Trek for Life and Breath 

set for Friday-Sunday, Oct. 4-6 



Courtesy report 

Hikers from all parts of the state 
will be taking part in the fifth annual 
Trek for Life and Breath which will 
begin Friday, Oct. 4 near Hillsgrove 
(Sullivan County) and is scheduled to 
end Sunday, Oct. 6 at Worids End State 
Park. 

The event, which was the first of its 
kind in Lycoming and SuUivan Coun- 
ties, is sponsored by the Central Penn- 
sylvania Limg and Health Service 
Association. 

The hikers, who raise pledges for 
months before the trek, will meet at 
Camp Lycogis Giri Scout Camp and 
traverse a 25-mile course of the 
Loyalsock Trail. 

The hikers will have a Warm-Up 
Get-Together Friday evening al the 



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TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


8;00 


Top Forty 

News 


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9:00 


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10:00 


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3:00 


Sports 

Hot Topics & Panel Forom 


Sports 
Com Events - Campus Tips 


Sports 
Drama 


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Comedy 


Sports 
Progressive 


4:00 


News 
Blues/Jazz 


News 
New Wave 


News 
OWies 


News 
Classical 


News 
Album of the Week 


5:00 


InteiTtational 


Punk Rock 


Reggae 


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Rale a Record - Film Review 
PM. Magazine 


6:00 


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Heavy Metal 


News 
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7:00 


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8:00 


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9:00 


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Scout Camp and a hikers' breakfast 
Saturday morning. 

Ten miles will be covered on both 
Saturday and Sunday. The trek ends 
with barbeques, t-shirts, and patches for 
all participants on Sunday afternoon. 

All meals and trail food are fur- 
nished by sponsoring Stroehmann 
Bakeries, Inc. 

In an effort to introduce novices to 
the backpacking experience, the Lung 
Association provides the wilderness ex- 
perience at no cost to the hiker. Three 
orientation sessions are planned to pro- 
vide participants vrith route details, 
equipment needs and first aid informa- 
tion. 

"The orientation sessions," accor- 
ding to Lauren Anderson, trek chairper- 
son, "are extremely important to the 
hiker." 

"They are staffed," she said, 
"with highly skilled hiking and 
backpacking experts." 

She explained that volunteers and 
staff of the Lung Association try to offer 
knowledge, skills, and tips to the hikers 
for which they might otherwise pay. 

The final orientation session is 
scheduled for next Friday, Sept. 27, 
from 7 to 9 p.m. at Nippenose, 231 W. 
Fourth St., in downtown Williamsport. 

Registration forms are available at 
many local backpacking and related 
business and the Lung Association of- 
fice at 531 W. Fourth St., also in 
downtown Williamsport. 

Additional information is available 
by telephoning (717) 322-3704 or 
1-800-932-0903. 

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8 a.m. • 12:00 p.m. & 4:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

Thursday 1 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 



Discount Rates for Appointments 
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Appointments Made that Week that Are Kept. 

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6aSP0TUGHTDM(aiO, 8«t- Mi iW 

::::v:^^:: : ::x 

SPOTLIGHTing... Dr. William J. Martin 



'Progress is happening all the time...' 




Dr. tAutiai5POTUOIITpltt>loliyLeR<tyS. WMtminJrJ 

First open PBL meeting set 
tomorrow; interested students invited 



Bj Ktlhy L. Cobb, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Dr. William J. Martin, dean of student services, is a Williamsport native. 

As dean of student services, Dr. Martin has been employed at the College 
for two years. He comments, "I've seen the College dramatically change in the 
two years I've been here. Progress is happening all the time - and the difference 
is monumental." 

He adds, "I think we're in a transition stage right now - especially since we 
are adapting to our new city sponsorship. 

"We are moving from the traditional to the future, from local focus on this 
institution to a national focus in a relatively short amount of time. The College is 
beginning to experience tremendous respect on the national level. 

"I'm proud to be a part of the WiUiamsport Area Community College," he 
states. 

Dr. Martin received his bachelor's degree in biology from Lycoming College 
and his master's degree and his doctorate in educational administration, secon- 
dary education from the Pennsylvania State University. 

A physical frtness enthusiast, he participates in running, racquetball, 
Nautilus, and - his favorite hobby - skuba diving. 

Dr. Martin and his wife, Carolyn, have been married for 15 years. Mrs. 
Martin is a fitness instructor at the Nautilus Center in WiUiamsport. Together, 
they enjoy traveUing to foreign places and have visited the Caribbean Isles and 
Mexico. 

As dean of student services at the College, Dr. Martin's responsibilities in- 
clude college marketing, admissions, advisement and career services, financial 
aid, and College activities. 



Jey^ish New Year observed today 



The first open meeting of Phi Beta 
Lambda (PBL) will be held tomorrow at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 329 of the Academic 
Center. 

Ceylon S. (Lonnie) Reinard, ac- 
counting student from Port Trevorton 




You haven't had a Hoagie 

until you've had a 

HOBY 

HOBY'S HOAGIES 
and PIZZA 

508 Fifth Avanua 

2 block, north of WACO, 

■croM trom Homo Svc. Bovor.go 

322-5455 

Fre« Delivery 

Ltmltod Aro* • Minimum Ordor S4.0o' 

Buy One Whole Hogle 
at Hoby's and Say... 

"You Haven't Had A 

Hoagie Until You've 

Had A Hoby" - 

And Get a Half Hoagie 

Free. [Sept. 16 thru 22nd] 
OPEN 11 A.M. to 1 A.M. 



and president of PBL, will preside. 

Paul W. Goldfeder, assistant pro- 
fessor of business and the organization's 
adviser, said he is giving a general m- 
vitation to aU students in the Business 
and Computer Technology Division to 
attend and participate in PBL activities. 

Students interested in becoming 
members of PBL are encouraged, he 
said, to pick up an application in the 
Phi Beta Lambda ofGce in Room 3, 
lower level. Academic Center. 

Among the items to be discussed at 
the first open meeting will be the 1985 
Fall Workshop to be held at South Hills 
Business School, Boalsburg, on Satur- 
day, Sept. 28. 

"Registration forms to attend this 
exciting workshop must be completed 
no later than Friday, Sept. 20," said 
Goldfeder. Memben who wish to attend 
should contact a PBL officer, he said. 

Standing committees are also being 
formed, the adviser said, and interested 
members may contact Reinard or Bren- 
da J. Wolfe, computer science student 
from Montoursville and PBL secretary. 

Accordmg to Goldfeder, a catered 
picnic will be held next Thursday, Sept. 
26, 6t>m 4:30 to 7 p.m. at the adviser's 
home in WiUiamsport. Members and aU 
interested students, he said, are 
welcome to attend. Those interested are 
asked to register in the PBL office. 

WANT TO SHAKE RIDE? 

Wanted: Slideat from 
Blooiiulwrg or rarroudlBg area to 
share ditving to W.A.C.C. CaU Matt 
Artman at 752-4088. fadvt.J 



Today marks the observance of the 
Jewish New Year. 

According to Rabbi Norman E. 
Singer, spiritual leader of Congregation 
Obev Sholom, the belief is that aU 
humanity is judged by God on this day. 

The rabbi elaborated on the obser- 
vance of the Jewish New Year: 

This day is celebrated in two ways. 



First, at home, with the famUy. Among 
other observances, families pray 
together. Through prayers and acts of 
righteousness, they believe, God wiU 
grant a better year. 

The second act of celebration is the 
sounding of the Ram's Horn. This is 
proscribed in the Book of Moses and, of 
course, dates back to ancient times. 



'Race' officially begins this Wednesday 

The Race Across the States vriU officiaUy begin at 7 a.m. this Wednesday, 
according to according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of CoUege ac- 
tivities. 

Those who wish to sign up may stUl do so - until 4 p.m. tomorrow. 

The Race includes two divisions: Advanced and Just-for-Fun. 

Those who enroU in the Advanced Division must average 20 miles per week. 
The average will be determined in the fifth week of the Race. 

There are also two categories for participants: Staff and students. 

The progress pins wiU be moved every Monday during the Race. The Race 
ends Nov. 5. 





BENSON 



CVfll mini, ^ 
/^inmarket 



Corner of 3rcl and Maynard Sts. 




Snacks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 



ALWAYS OPEN - ALL NIGHT, HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



College musicians wanted for Dixieland contest 



SPOTUGHTaMoidaT. 8«pt. li, IMS 7 



Courtesy report 

The dream to "stmt your stuff" in 
front of a national television audience 
or a crowd of 50,000 enthusiastic jazz 
devotees is not as impossible as it first 
appears. In fact, it's as easy as whistlin' 
Dixie. 

The sixth annual Southern Com- 
fort Collegiate E>ixieland Jazz Competi- 
tion - a national talent hunt to discover 
America's best collegiate Dixie troup 



Early Warning 
System... 
...See Page 4 



-offers what might be considered a 
dream come true. 

Mmy rtceive medit covenge 

Past champions - two of whom 
had never played a Dixie tune prior to 
the competition - have had the oppor- 
tunity to perform with the likes of actors 
and or musicians such as Hal Linden 
("Barney Miller"), Conrad Janis (Min- 
dy's father from "Mork & Mindy"), 
and Tommy Newsom, assistant musical 
director of "The Tonight Show". Most 
of the musicians also received media ex- 
posure on such national TV shows as 
"Good Morning America", the "To- 
day Show", and the "Merv Griffith 
Show". 

In addition to a national con- 
cert/media tour, the winning college 
group receives $1,000 individual 
scholarships and a $1,000 grant to their 
school's music department from the 



Ful, Free DtUver; 



S2.00 off iny li-incb, 3-lteiii or aore pizu 
One Coupon Per Piia 

Expires Sept. 22nd. 

{Customer pays iaies lax and bottle depostll 



1 



LIMITED DELIVERY AREA 



Open for Lunch 

1303 Washington Blvd. „.„<, , „ . ^.^ , „ s„„j„ . Thoudty 

Phone: 322-2022 ,1.00 , „ . 2 ,.„,. Fridiy i Siiord«y 




contest sponsor, Southern Comfort. 
The National Association of Jazz 
Educators (NAJE) co-sponsors the an- 
nual competition. 

Audition ciMclle reqaired 

Any college musician can assemble 
a jazz ensemble and compete. 

Based on audition cassettes which 
must be less than 20 minutes and in- 
clude rendition of the Dixielanbd stan- 
dard "South Rampart Street Parade", 
three bands will be selected to compete 
in a Uve "Battle of the Dixie jazz 
bands" in Anaheim, Calif., from Jan. 9 
to 12. 

Audition cassettes must be received 
no later than Friday, Nov. 15. 

Additional information and an en- 
try kit is available by writing to 
Southern Comfort Dixieland Competi- 
tion, 211 East Ontario, Chicago, 111. 
60611, or by telephoning Area 
312-280-7000. 



Dental Hygiene Week 

begins; mayor visits 

College's clinic 

WOliamsport Mayor Stephen 
Lucasi visited the Dental Hygiene 
Clinic on the fourth floor of the 
Academic Center last week to note 
National Dental Hygiene Week 
-which is currently underway. 

The special week began 
yesterday and continues this week. 

During his visit on campus, 
the mayor read a proclamation 
declaring the special observance. 
He gave those involved with the 
clinic congratulations and wished 
them luck. 

He also thanked them for 
their contribution to the com- 
munity of Wilhamsport. 

The program was initiated by 
the College's Student American 
Dental Hygiene Association 
(SADHA). 



Susquehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 



The Susquehanna Room's menu 
for the week starting today, Monday, 
Sept. 16, is presented as i\imished by 
the Susquehanna Room management. 

DiUy Bretkfut 

Scrambled eggs, 59'; hash browns, 55'; 
home fi^, 55'; pancakes, $1.29; French toast, 
99'; waffles, 99'; sausage, 79'; Muffin Supreme, 
tl.09; Croissant Surprise, $1.39; Colorado pita 
pocket, $1.59. 

Dall; Silid Bv 

Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomoatoes, 
onions, broccoh, cauliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, 
bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple 
butter, Jello, potato salad, com reUsh. 

Today, Mooday, Sept. li 
Linch 

Beef and peppers, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.59; Baked ziti, ttalian bread, $2.19. 
Soap 
Chicken noodle or cream of potato. 

Dinner 
Ham & cabbage, carrots, boiled potatoes, 
$2.59; chili con came, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.59. 

Sandwiches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; chicken salad in pita, $1.59; fried 
bolopa/cbeese, $1.29; bacon club, $1.79; 
French tries, 55'. 

Tsesday, Sept. 17 
Lgncb 

Meatioaf, gravy, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.39; ham & cheese omelet, home fries, toast, 
$2.89. 

Soop 

Chili and vegetable beef. 
Dinner 

Breaded pork chop, gravy, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.59; short ribs of beef, gravy, 
potatoes, vegetable, $2.89. 
Sandwickei 

(Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with lopping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; fish sandwich $1.29; meatball 
hoagie, $1.59; ham BBQ, $1.25; French fries, 
55'. 



Wedioday, Sept. 18 
Lmcb 

Roast chicken, gravy, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.39; Sausage Calabrese, ItaUan bread, $2.39. 
Soip 
Cora chowder or beef noodle. 
Dinner 
Deep Sea Delite, potatoes, vegetable, S2.9S; 
Veal Parmigiana w/pasta, Italian bread, $2.89. 
Sandwicka 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70"; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; meatioaf sandwich, $1.29; turkey 
sandwich, $1.59; tuna salad, $1.59; French 
fnes, 55'. 



Thanday, Sept. 19 
Luck 

Hungarian goulash, vegetable, $2.59; fish 
and chips, vegetable, $2.39. 
Soap 
Chicken rice or vegetable chowder. 

DIaaer 
Filled chicken breast, gravy, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.79; saUsbury steak, gravy, 
potatoes, vegetable, $2.39. 
Sandwiches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; egg salad sandwich, $1.29; 
chicken hoagie, $1.59; taco, 99"; French fties, 
55'. 



Friday, Sept. U 
Lanch 

Macaroni and Cheese, vegetable, $2.19; 
pork stir fry over rice. $2.39. 
Soap 
Ham and bean or cream of broccoli. 

Dinner 
Spaghetti NapiUtaoo, small salad bar, 
Italian bread, $2.89; beef pot pie, vegetable, 
$2.39. 

Saadwicket 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with upping, 70*; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; steak & cheese, $1.79; BLT, 
$1.59; roast pork, $1.59; French Mcs, 55'. 



SasptrnJceraMoidij, s«pi. w, ins 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Sept. 16 through Sunday, Sept. 22 
SPECIAL DAYS THIS WEEK 

Today... Jewish New Year. 

Sunday... Autumn officially begins. 

ACnVi'llES 

Bake salt... this Thursday, Sept. 19, 8 a.m. until 7, Academic Center Lob- 
by, sponsored by Circle K Club. 

MEETINGS 

Gamma Epsilon Tau (GET)... noon, tomorrow, Sept. 17, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Nartottcs Anonymous... 7 to 10 p.m., this Wednesday, Sept. 18, Room 
BI07, Lifelong Education Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda (PBL)... 3:30 p.m., this Wednesday, Sept. 18, Room 
329, Academic Center. 

Student Government Association (SGA)... Executive, 4 p.m., tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Sept. 17, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association (SGA)... Senate, 5 p.m., tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Sept. 17, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center.. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Library hours... Sunday hours -- from 2 to 9 p.m. - were started Sunday, 
Sept. 13 (yesterday) and will be continue throughout the semester except for 
Thanksgiving weekend. 

December Graduates... last day to petition to graduate is Friday, Sept. 27. 

SPOTLIGHT '85 staff selection 
completed; committees listed 



Part-Time Employment 

The following information about part-time employment is provided by the 
College Placement Ctffice, Room 157, Learning Resources Center. Inquiries 
should be directed to that office. 



The staff positions for the Fall 1983 
semester for The SPOTLIGHT, student 
newspaper at the College, have been 
determined, according to Anthony N. 
Cillo, faculty adviser. 

Wanna F. Brown, a journalism 
student from Port Trevorton, was 
selected to fill the position of managing 
editor. 

Other selections include: 

--Cynthia E. A. Hartranft, a jour- 
nalism student from Williamsport, 
advertising director. 

-LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr., a jour- 
nalism student from Mill Hall, 
photography editor. 

-Sandra L. Musgrave, a jour- 
nalism student from Lewisburg, 
editorial page editor. 

-Kathy L. Cobb, an individual 
studies student (with mass communica- 
tions emphasis) from WiUiamsport, ad- 
ministrative affairs reporter. 

-Lyie A. Wagner, a graphic arts 
m^jor from Millville, production coor- 
dinator. 



-Timothy F. Neidig, graphic arts 
major from Williamsport, photographer 
and photomechanical darkroom techni- 
cian. 

-Kelly S. Herrold, journalism ma- 
jor from Selinsgrove, secretary to the 
editorial board. 

Among committee appointments 
made thus far, Cillo said, are: 

-Whitmire, staff athletic director 
and chairperson of the staff fitness pro- 
gram committee. 

-Galene M. Castlebury, who has 
an undeclared major and is from Mun- 
cy, chairperson of the staff relations 
committee. 

-Neidig, chairperson. Fall field 
trip committee. 

-Susan R. Kallansrud, chairper- 
son, yearbook seminar liaison commit- 
tee. 

The adviser said other committee ap- 
pointments will be made this week. 

A staff "get-together and get ac- 
quainted hour" was scheduled to be 
held last Friday, he noted. 



Cillo's * 

College 
Corner 

PHONE M. 

322-1321 ^ 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Come on over and get 
somethin' good to eat! 



Your favorite Snbs and 
Burgers (he way you like 'em 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 

Four winners ^ 
every week 
• * 

0/wn for Breakfast 
HOURS • Men. Ihro Thurs. 
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



STUDENT COOK 

Lewisburg Hotel, Lewisburg, has an opening for a student cook for cold 
preparations and short orders; part-time, evenings and weekends. Will train 
under two professional chefs. Call Chris Van Sant, owner/manager, at 523-1216 
for an appointment. 

PIZZA PERSON 

Little Caesar's Pizza, Golden Strip, has part-time openings. Must be 
available weekends and have a driver's license. Fast food experience preferred. 
10-20 hours per week. Apply in person or call 327-8600. 
PHARMACY CLERK 

Rite Aid Pharmacy, 1219 W. Southern Ave., South Williamsport, has an 
opening for a part-time clerk, 15 hours per week; days, evenings, and weekends. 
Must be 21 years of age. Apply in person. 

WAFFRESSES 

Barry's, 234 Park St., has openings for part-time waitresses, 11 a.m. to I 
p.m., every day; 9 to II p.m. every evening for waitressing and cleaning. Apply 
in person. 

College featured in national periodicals 

■■■ Continued from Page I 

there's been a major change in the Col- 
lege in the last four or five years... We 
have demolished several of our worst 
buildings, renovated others and built 
new, innovative structures. 

"We have conquered major in- 
roads in the acquisition of instructional 
equipment. We have dropped some of 
our more unpopular programs and 
modified others so that students 
graduate with proper, updated skills." 

He continued, saying, "With the 
new Advanced Technology and Health 

Le Jeune Chef 

maConlinuedfrom Page /■■■ 

Bay mousse, 70 cents (with almond 
cookies, 75 cents). 

Menu for Friday 

Soup dujour - chilled peach soup, 
80 cents. 

Light luncheon - seafood antipasto 
platter, roll, beverage, $2.75. 

Special for the day - feta Floren- 
tine in jumbo shells, garden medley with 
mint sauce, rolls, beverage, $3.50. 

Desserts - frozen yogurt with 
raspberry sauce, 70 cents; assorted pies, 
65 cents; individual baked Alaska, 70 
cents. 

IM flag football meeting tomorrow 

A flag football meeting wiU be held at 5:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Gym- 
nasium, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

Everyone who signed up - including all team members - should attend, she 
said. 

Scheduling and clinics will be determined at that time, she said. 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Clean, well-healed rooms available. Close to College. 

Showers, Kitchen. 

$50.00 weekly includes complimentary breakfast and lunch. 

Contact Barry at 323-3663 or 327-1889 or at 234 Park St. 

(Opposite east parking lot) 



Sciences Center, we will offer many new 
programs, such as fiber optics and 
telecommunications. 

"Therein lies the future of the Col- 
lege... a stronger education. Our 
customers are those who hire our 
graduates. We must change to ac- 
comodate their needs. Certainly what 
we teach our students must be relative 
to today's and tomorrow's world." 

Dr. Breuder said he asks that 
"each student made a concerted effort 
to learn... take full advantage of the 
diverse programs offered by the 
College." He would like to remind 
students to be respectfiil of College in- 
structors and other personnel as well as 
cunent and new buildings and equip- 
ment. 

ATTENTION 
ANY ENTHUSUSTIC PERSON 
How would you like to be on the 
radio? WWAS 88FM is starting a pro- 
gram involving small comedy, 
melodramatic, or serions drama skits. 
If yoD would like to lake part in acting 
on the radio then get in touch with Kim 
Bowman in Room B104 of the LEC. 
ladvtj 



SfSSSSSJSSSSSSSWSSiH:?; 



SSS**^ftWSSS¥S¥iWSWS*Jfi«fS¥»:ii««!i4S¥ft:*.¥^ 



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POTLIGHT 

Mondi;, S<pl 23, 198S • Vol 10, No S • S Pata • WaUiniport Am Comiagiiily CoDcp • Winiumporl, Pi 177(1 

Study, research skills 
seminars begin this week 




PROCLAMATION PRESE^fTED 

WOUtmsport M«yor Stephen Lnc«sl presenU a proclimatioo recognizing 
Nttional Dentil Hygiene Weeli to Ms. Darie Jane Nestariclt, director of the 
Health Sciences Division. See other photo, page 4.j 



Special seminars devised by College 
staff to help students who might be suf- 
fering from academic deficiencies -and 
especially those who received "early 
warning cards" - begin this week. 

Study skills seminars, set up by the 
Advisement and Career Services Center, 
begin today. Interested students should 
sign up with Mrs. Catherine Shaffer, in 
Room 157, the Career Center, in the 
Learning Resources Center. 

These seminars are from 4:30 to 6 
p.m. 

The seminars are to be instructed 
by Dr. William J. Martin, dean of stu- 
dent services; Lawrence W. Emery Jr., 
director of counseling, career develop- 
ment, and placement, and Dean R. 
Foster, director of developmental 
studies. 

These seminars, which meet from 
4:30 to 6 p.m., will be conducted today 
and Monday, Sept. 30; tomorrow and 
Tuesday, Oct. 1; this Wednesday and 
Wednesday, Oct. 2, and this Thursday 
and Thursday, Oct. 3. (Seminars are 



done in dual sessions, one a week.) 

Also beginning this week are 
Library Research Skills Seminars. They 
,we to be instructed by Mrs. Marilyn G. 
Bodnar, reference librarian, and Mrs. 
Ann E. Gibson, Ubrary technician. 

These sessions are scheduled to be 
held: 

Tomorrow and next Tuesday, Oct. 
1, from 3 to 4 p.m.; this Wednesday 
and next Wednesday, Oct. 2, from 4:30 
to 3:30 p.m., and this Thursday and 
next Thursday, Oct. 3, from 7 to 8 p.m. 

Students may sign up in the 
Library for any of these sessions. 



Several hundred 

expected to attend 

yearbook workshop 

Several hundred students who 
are members of high school and 
other schools' yearbook staffs are 
expected to attend a yearbook 
workshop on the College's main 
campus tomorrow. 

The workshop, entitled 
"Yearbookability '&!", will be a 
day-long event. 

Susan R. Kallansrud, a jour- 
nalism student from Williamsport, 
is the chairman of the 
SPOTLIGHT'S yearbook 
workshop liaison committee. 
Faculty Uaison is Anthony N. 
Cillo, associate professor of jour- 
nalism. 



Multi-Cultural Society to meet 
Oct. 1; 'visitors welcome' 



The Multi-Cultural Society of the 
College will meet at 11:30 a.m., next 
Tuesday, Oct. 1, in Room BI07, 
Lifelong Education Center, according to 
Linda E. Whaley, one of the co-advisers 
to the group. 

Visitors and persons interested in 
joining the group are welcome to attend, 
she said. 

Those who have questions about 
the group may contact Ms. Whaley in 
Room 208, Lifelong Education Center, 
or by telephoning College Ext. 307, or 
they may contact Mrs. Maryann R. 
Lampman, reading instructor who is 
also a co-adviser, in Room 159, Learn- 
ing Resources Center. 

On Sept. 27, 1984, the group was 
ofBcially organized - after about two 



SPOTLIGHTIng... 

Dr. Fraser 

...See Page 3 




1^ 



years of effort by those interested in for- 
ming the group. 

The goal of the Society is to pro- 
vide practical, social, and educational 
opportunities related to the needs of the 
non-traditional student (such as one 
who is handicapped in a physical, 
educational or economic sense and/or 
less than full-time). The goals of the 
Society also include planning to spread 
awareness of other cultures through ac- 
tivities and guest speakers. 



sSB mi 



HAWAIIAN LOOK 
Brenda L. Bozochovic, general 
slndies stodenl from WilUamsport, has 
been among those wearing "the 
Hawaiian looli" this semester. 

In next week's SPOTUGHT, sU^ 
pholopaphen aipturt other "styles" 
atound the CoUegf. 



Next Week: Sobriety checks and drunk driving 



iDSPOTUGHTDMonU;, Sept. U, »K 



The mace, a symbol of authority 
used in College ceremonies -- par- 
ticularly commencement - was design- 
ed by Frederick T. Gilmour, now ex- 
ecutive director of the College Founda- 
tion, in 1966, at the request of Dr. Ken- 
neth E. Carl, who then was College 
president. 

Gilmour, at that time, was a stu- 
dent in the technical illustration pro- 
gram. 
At a time of change 

According to Gilmour, Dr. Carl's 
request came at a time when the College 
was changing from a technical institute 
to a community college status. 

He said Dr. Carl specified that he 
design the mace to be produced within 
College capacities: machine shop and 
carpentry students were involved in its 
construction. 
Under direction of Wilier Hirtmin 

Mr. Gilmour slated that he created 
the design for the mace under the direc- 
tion of the late Walter Hartman, who 
was then instructor of technical illustra- 
tion. 

The following description is provid- 
ed by the Library (LRC): The mace 
stands approximately five feet tall. Its 
base consists of 16 fasces bound 
togehter by leather thongs, symbolizing 
the strength and unity of the College 
faculty. 
Each stone representative 

Immediately above the bundle of 
fasces is a walnut cyhnder in which are 
set 15 semi-precious stones. Each stone 
represents one member of the College 
Board of Trustees. 

According to Gilmour, Alfred L. 
Hauser, associate professor of machine 
tool technology, whose outside interests 




include semi-precious stones, assisted 
with this part of the mace. 
Variooi 'symbob' used 

Above the cylinder is a hexagonal 
(six-sided) insignia blocit; on each of its 
faces is located a stainless steel engrav- 
ing. These include a key, symboUzing 
the means by which one opens the door 
to knowledge and understanding; a set 
of paired gears, symbolizing the in- 
dustrial technologies; and oscilloscope 
pattern, symbolizing the electronics 
field; a micrometer, sybolizing tool 
making and machine trades; a divider. 



Dr. William J, Martin, dean ol stu 
dent services, has expressed concern 
over student on-campus driving habits. 
An area ol particular concern, he said. 
Is speeding on Susquehanna Street 
enroute to or from the parking area 
behind the Automotive Trades Center. 

He said he emphatically urging 
students and others to strictly adhere 



to the 10 mlles-per-hour regulations. 

Those who do not adhere to cam- 
pus driving regulations run the risk ol 
being lined by campus security ol- 
llcers, he noted, adding: "In all my 
years as an administrator, I have seen 
very lev* actual Injuries due to 
carelessness ol student drivers... 
however, when it does happen. It Is a 
terrible human tragedy." 



The mace: 

a symbol of authority 




By Kithy L. Cobb 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



symbolizing the engineering 
technologies; and a laurel branch, sym- 
bolizing the fame and honor achieved 
by these young men and women who 
graduate from the College. 

Atop the insignia block is a 
chrome-plated polyhedron (12-sided 
sphere). The many facets of the 
polyhedron represent the many facets of 
learning. 

Capping the mace is an open book 
which symbolizes both the repository of 
mankind's knowledge and the hope that 
the educated man will be open-minded 



THE MACE, 

designed by 
Frederick T. 
Gilmour, execntive 
director of (he 
Wllllamsport Area 
Commnnily Col- 
lege Fonndidon, is 
on display in the 
College Library. 



enough to entertain all possiblities of 
thought and action. 

At commencement, the current 
president of the Williamsport Area 
Community College Education Associa- 
tion carries the mace in the proces- 
sional. 

This spring, John K. Hammond, 
associate professor of automotive, will 
have that honor and responsibility. 
On display in Library 

The mace is on display in the 
Library, in the Learning Resources 
Center. 



Dean Martin states concern: 
speeding on Susquehanna St. 



A season to forget 



SPOTLIQHT 
Mondiy, S*pt. 2a, IMS • Vol. 21, No 6 

coDt^w m^Df "J ''„'"""'»!'«' »«<:f Mo"Oay momino ol the acaaemic yaar. a,. 

.77?r=°Ta,aro:a:%?^?2'"^:=3?6'r'E«,:n°s^^^2r'"' ^" ' '"'"'"-"■ "' 



Commentary 
By LeRoy S. Whitmira Jr. 
Of Th« SPOTLIQHT StaH 

The 1985 baseball season will pro- 
bably be remembered lor the drug 
scandal and not lor the great ac- 
complishments. 

Names like Dale Berra ol the Pitt- 
sburgh Pirates, Keith Hernadez ol the 
New York Mels, Dave Parker ol the 
Cincinnati Reds and Willie Stargel and 
Willie Mays, bring newspaper 
headlines that shame the game. 

It's time to put the drug trial 
against Curtis "Chel Curt" Strong on 



the back burner and realize the ac- 
complishments this season. With all 
the publicity of the trial, history in the 
making is going unnoticed. 

...Like Pete Rose breaking ol 
Cobb's record lor most hits In a Hie 
time... Dwighl Gooden, the youngest 
pitcher ever to win 20 games in a 
season... and the neck and neck pen- 
nant race In the National League East 
between the New York Mets and St. 
Louis Cardinals. 

This Is what baseball Is all about 
breaking records and tight pennant 
races. I'm alrald this will be a season 
most people would wish to forget. 



Help save water 



Opinions expressed are those ol the student newspaper or ol those whose 
names accompany items Opinions do not reflect otIlclalTnlon ol thelnlt.^" 

The SPOTLIGHT Is a memOsr ol 
Ihe Columbia Scholaslic Press Association 



The SPOTLIGHT urges Its readers to help the local community save 
water by being concerned about water usage on campus 

We encourage readers to share suggestions about water conserva- 
^on and welcome those suggestions: Bring or send them to The 
SPOTLIGHT, Room 7, Academic Center (basement). Suggestions must 
carry the name ol the person making the suggestion as well as a 
telephone number lor validation purposes. 



SPOniCHTDMondiy, Stpl. 13, 19«5nJ 



SPOTLIGHTing... Dr. Jeannette L. Fraser 




"V^ 



DR. JEANNETTE L. FRASER, detn of edncitionil research 

/SPOTLIGHT photo by URoy F. Whilmire Jr.j 



Peer Information & Referral Center 

Complete Confidentiality 



Room 105 
Gymnasium 



If you have a problem, 

come and talk to us 

whether the problem 

Is major or small. 



HOURS 

Monday - Thursday: 10:00 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Friay: 10:00 am. to 4 p.m. 

Closed Weekends 

Students Helping Fellow Students 



Next Tuesday 

Make a note... 

Multi-Cultural Society 

meeting 

11:30 a.m. 

RoomB-107,LEC 



Newly-appointed dean's duties include 
updating College's Long Range Plan 



Dr. Jeannette L. Fraser, dean of 
educational research, planning and 
evaluation, is a native of Gary, Ind. 

Dr. Fraser has been employed by 
the College since July IS and is still at- 
tempting to familiarize herself with the 
campus. She commented, "I've been to 
a lot of community colleges across the 
nation and this College is the most im- 
pressive I've ever seen." 

Dr. Fraser received her 
bachelor's, master's, and doctoral 
degrees from Ohio State University, 
Columbus, Ohio. Her major for all 
three degrees was political science. 

Before coming to the College, Dr. 
Fraser was employed by the National 
Center for Research in Vocational 
Education, Columbus, Ohio. 
Involved with robotic lechDology 

She was involved with researching 
robotic/automated manufacturing and 
laser technology. 

As dean of educational research, 
planning and evaluation, Dr. Fraser's 



responsibilities include updating the 
Long Range Plan developed two years 
ago, involving input from students, staff 
and administration. 

Other duties include needs analyses 
and program evaluations. She is also 
responsible for response to Middle 
States Accreditation. She reports on 
any accreditation activities, such as the 
development of a College government 
system, by April 1. 

To leach clus 

Dr. Fraser is also involved in the 
development of enrollment projection 
models. 

Dr. Fraser will instruct a class in 
State and Local Government in the Spr- 
ing semester, 1986. It will be her fint 
teaching experience. 

She stated, "The College is future- 
oriented. I think it's important that not 
only the administration is looking to the 
future, but the staff is optimistic as well. 
It says a lot for the College." 



GET holds second meeting 

Gamma Epsilon Tau (GET), graphic arts fraternity, held its second meeting 
of this academic year last Tuesday in Room B107, Lijfelong Education Center. 

Pledge sheets from prospective members were collected. Arrangements were 
made to meet yesterday to distribute copies of the organization's constitution 
and to go over it for any clarifications which might have been necessary. 

Next Tuesday, Oct. I, was set as the deadline for dues. 

Tomonow, the group's meeting will be held at another location. Those 
planning to attend should check a notice on the door of the usual meeting place. 



DENNIS BUCK HAIRSTYLING 

; "Pm/tssional HalrstyUng" FuU-stylt Salon for Mm ami Women 

Phone 326-3608 HiUnwmjM 



1«« off with YiUdited itadcnt ID 
' Offer Eipim Oct. 12, IflS 



Hiinlylc w/ihimpoo $1 

$1.00 off any hairstyle 
or style & shampoo with 
validated student ID 



325 Walnut Street 

Only (4) Bloclu from W.A.C.C. Mod. t Fri. 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

(Between Third k Fourth Streets) Tie.., Wed., Tb.n. ft Sti. » a.m. to 6 p.m. 



^ 




Open 6 a.m. to midnight 

Monday thru Friday 

Open Saturday I p.m. to 3 am. 



BARRY'S 

B ) Barry says: We won't cook i burger before its time. 



PHONE 
323-FOOD 



Brooklyn Style Eatery ) 

•A UNIQUE EATING EXPERIENCE 
•BEST BREAKFAST IN TOWN 
•ARCADE AND POOL TABLE 
•DAILY SPECIALS 

234 Park St. Just across from 
the new east parking lot 






I 



4aSPOTUGHTDMoid«, Sept. U, INS 




Phi Beta Lambda annual picnic 
to be held this Thursday 



DENTAL HYGIENE WEEK PROCLAIMED 

Miyor Slcphen Lacui, of WiDiinuport, mled it right, wu on cunpos 
eirtier Ihii monlh to lociUy iuDC i prodtmidoii for Dtnttl Hygiene Week. 
Among tbofe attending the ceremony in the Acidemic Center were Rie Ann 
Kirichner, director of the Dentil Hygiene Clinic, Kited, u well is (from left, 
stinding) Kimberly A. Fox, lecreliry-treunrer of the Student American Den- 
til Hygiene Auociition (SADHA); Sandra L. Brady, rice president of 
SADHA; Donna A. Prince, SADHA president; Patty A. Dnrand, class 
representative; Suzanne U. Wagner; Ms. Davie Jane Nestarick, director, 
Health Sciences Division, and Dr. James E. Middleton, dean of academic af- 
fairs. /SPOTLIGHT pholo by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. I 

Catering class completes first event 



The catering class whicti is part of 
tlie College's food and hospitality 
management program completed its first 
off-campus event of the year on Satur- 
day, Sept. 14. It was cateiiog an affair 
for 140 persons at the Northway 
Presbyterian Church. 

The student manager was RolKit 



G. Manley and the front-of-the-house 
manager was Carol A. Kieger. Both are 
second-year students. 

The class also catered an affair for 
the Peoosylvania Home Economics 
Association last Thursday evening. The 
manager was Susan A. Kiil, a second- 
year student. 



Short on Cash? 

Then shop where you eon save 



Come to The Mart 
The Exchange Mart 

314 West Fonilh Street 



Hours: Tnes. thru Tfanrs. 9:30 a.m. lo 4 p.m. 
Friday 9:30 a.m. to 7:15 p.m. 
Sitnrday 9:30 a.m. lo noon 

It's Nice to Shop Where You Can Save 



♦ 

♦ 
♦ 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 

PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

Hoan: Mog.-Sil. 11 i.n. lo i p.m. Ooicd SidiU; 



DAILY SPECIALS 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Regular Sub 

Meatball 

Turkey 

Ham 

Tuna 

Cheese Steak 



Whole $1.60 
Whole SI. 75 
Whole $1.40 
Whole $1.80 
Whole $1.70 
Whole $2.50 



•Subs AU Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" $4 whole $2.10 half 



The lOth annual Phi Beta Lambda 
(PBL) catered picnic will be held this 
Thursday from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at the 
home of the adviser, Paul W. Goldfeder 
in Wilhamsport. 

PBL members and prospective 
members are welcome to attend, the ad- 
viser said. 

Those interested are asked to make 
reservations at 4 p.m. tomorrow in 
Room 3, lower level, of the Academic 
Center or with any PBL officer. Maps 
to Goldfeder's home will also be 
available in Room 3. 
Fall workshop on Sept. 28 

The Annual Fall Workshop will be 
held at South Hills Business School, 
Boalsburg, this Saturday, according to 
Goldfeder. 

The workshop is hosted by the 
chapter from Penn State University and 
South Hills business students. 

The day-long workshop begins with 

Le Jeune Chef 
opening draws 
large crowd 

Le Jeune Chef kicked off its Fall 
schedule with an opening that was a 
complete success, according to those in- 
volved. 

Dr. Cynthia N. Schloss, assistant 
professor of quantity food production, 
said, "Everything ran smoothly, with 
plenty of people stopping in for meals." 
She added, "The crowd was very cor- 
dial and quite pleased with the appetiz- 
ing menu." 

She said she is encouraging 
everyone to come to the student- 
operated restaurant today, Wednesday 
and Friday from II a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Reservations, she said, are requested, 
but walk-ins are welcome. 

Le Jeune Chef is coordinated by 
Dr. Schloss and Ms. Judith M. 
Patschke, quantity foods production in- 
structor. 

The student-operated restaurant's 
name, translated, is "The Young Chef 
in Training", the coordinators said. 



registration at 9:30 a.m. and the 

keynote business session following at 

10:30 a.m. by the state adviser, who is 

Goldfeder. 

Officen' duties featured 

One of the workships featured will 
be on parliamentary procedure and of- 
ficers' duties. Another highlight of the 
workshop will be exhibits and 
demonstrations by Wang Computer. 

A buffet luncheon and fashion 
show will be held in the afternoon with a 
banquet and dance in the evening. 
There will also be casino gambling with 
play money and a silent auction to 
follow. 

Those who wish to stay overnight 
may contact him, Goldfeder said, for 
information about special rates at a 
nearby motor iim. 

The next meeting of the College's 
chapter will be held next Wednesday, 
Oct. 2, Goldfeder said. 



S.N.O.W. elects 
Fall semester 



officers 



The Student Nurses of the 
Wilhamsport Area Community College 
(S.N.O.W.) has elected officers. 

The officers were elected at the 
beginning of the semester, according to 
Mrs. Margaret L. McKeehen, adviser 
for the group. 

Linda Betlott, a third semester stu- 
dent, was elected president. Ann 
TrepanowsH, a second semester stu- 
dent, was elected vice president. Ann 
Patler, a first semester student, was 
elected secretary, and Deanna EgU, a 
first semester student, was elected 
treasurer. 

Mrs. McKeehan stated that the stu- 
dent nurses are plannmg two important 
events in October. On Oct. 9, the 
nurses will hold a hunters' screemng 
course at Divme Providence Hospital. 
On Oct. 23, the nurses plan to organize 
a Bloodmobile visit at the College from 
9:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. 



The Boy Scouts were founded on 
Feb. 8, 1910. The Girl Scouts were 
founded March 12, 1912. 



P H M I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ ■ 

iFREE PIIIA! 



1 



Buy any size Little Caesars 
Original round pizza at regubr 
price, get the identical pizza 
FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 



I 

Id 



!) 



W.A.C.C. HadeiiU nit 
•ddillaatl 10% only with 
■tBdeiil I.D. ud Ihii id. 

One coupon per customer Carry out only At participating locations, h 



Tattoo: better safe than sorry 

By R. Lynn Sherliiuki 



Hamaii Mrrko itideiil from WiDhuniport 

It is apparent to me that tattooing 
is becoming more popular in the 
Wilhamsport area. You might be think- 
ing of getting one yourself. Let's talk 
about it and get some facts straight... 
I'll try to give some guidelines. 

If you decide to get a tattoo, your 
first concern should be the sanitary con- 
ditions of the particular tattooist you 
have chosen. Maybe this is something 
you didn't know: you could die from a 
bad tattoo or suffer for the rest of your 
life. The worst effects could be 
hepatitis, skin poisoning, blood poison- 
ing, and AIDS. There are also many 
others. Don't let the tattooist just talk 
about his sterilization equipment, make 
him show you. If he refuses or tries to 
avoid it, he probably doesn't have any. 
Don't let anyone tell you they have a 
sterilization fluid. There is no such 
thing. Any good professional will be 
glad to show his method and explain it 
to you. Look around the place; if it 
seems dirty, untidy, or unsanitary in 
any way, run --don't walk ~ away. 

Another major issue: don't be fool- 
ed by "good deals". You get what you 
pay for. A good deal can go sour when 
it turns into a bad case of hepatitis. 
There are several tattooists in this town 
who will offer you cut-rate tattoos. One 
question you should ask yourself: do 
you want a cut-rate tattoo on your body 
for the rest of your life? The least you 
might get from one of these so-called 
tattooists is an awfiil tattoo or a tattoo 
that will never heal properly. Don't rely 
on things like business cards or someone 
who got a great tattoo for next-to- 
nothing. Did you know sometimes 
AIDS doesn't even show up for five 
years? By that time you wouldn't even 
connect the tattoo with it. Hepatitis can 
take up to six months. 

There is only one professional tat- 




R. LYNN SHERLINSKI, human Mrrices student from Wifliamsport 



SPOTLIGHTDMoQdi;, Sept. 23, 19I5d5 

Schedules set up 
for open gym, 
other activities 



Regular Sunday hours were 
scheduled to begin yesterday for open 
gym and for the weight room, according 
to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. Those 
hours are 5 to 9 p.m. 

Reviewing related activities, she 
reported: 
Flag foolbill cUnici 

A flag football referee clinic will be 
held from 5 to 7 p.m. today at the 
athletic field. 

Flag football clinics will be held 
from 4 to 8 p.m. today, tomorrow, and 
Wednesday at the athletic field (weather 
permitting). 
Open gym 

Regular hours for open gym are: 
Tonight, 4 to tO p.m.; closed Tuesday; 
Wednesday from 4 to 8 p.m. if weather 
is bad. 
Weight room 

The weight room will be closed 
every Tuesday from 7 to 8 p.m. 
Table tennis 

Table tennis will be available 
tonight and Wednesday from 6 to 8 
p.m. in the gym. Those interested are 
reminded, Mrs. Fremiotti said, to wear 
appropriate gym footgear. 



too parlor in this area I would endorse. 
It's a legitimate business. It has a 
business license, is inspected by the 
board of health, is a permanent shop, 
and advertises in our local newspaper. 
I spent seven years in the profes- 
sional tattooing business; in that time, 
I've seen every conceivable horror 
known to tattooing. Please be careful, a 
tattoo is for life; a bad one could take 
yours. 



The Star Spangled Banner was Benjamin Franklin was bom Jan. 

written on Sept. 14, 1814. 17, 1706. 



BENSON 



Offl mini. ^ 
f^nu market 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



Snacks ( < ^ ,' 

Hoi and Cold Drinks .: --^ ^^t ^ 

Groceries -"^ \ 
1/^ Gasoline yl 

ALWAYS OPEN - ALL NIGHT, HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 




ABC BOWLING LANES 

1245 Park Avenue (at Rose St.) 
College League Sign-Ups 

Men, Women, or Mixed 
Four Persons per Team 

Sign Up & Start Sept. 17 at 4 P.M. 
Price $3.00 Free Shoes 




Phone 326-2885 for more information 

Free Trophies and Banquet 
Provided by ABC Bowling Lanes 



6DSPOTUGHTDMoii<b;, Scpl. Z3, IMS 




GENERAL MANAGER FROM SHICKSHINNY 

The general miniger of WWAS-8gFM, the College's Jlodent-operited 
ndio alitlon is Michael A. Wright. Wright can be heard on Tuesday mornings 
from 8 to 10. He is flve-foot-10 and blond. He can be recognized by his 
fashionable beard and "knowing smile". His interests include playing the 
guitar, listening to soft rock music and reading horror no?els. He is from 
SUckstalnny and is working at WCNR, Bloomsbnrg. /SPOTLIGHT pholo/ 



HAIR CONCEPTS INC. 

300 Shiffler Ave. • Triangle Building 
Phone 323-8860 

Full Service Salon Staff 
•David Vaughn, President' 
Hair Designing 
Haircutting 
Facials 
Manicuring 



==i 



Massage 

Suntan Bed 

Make Up 

Perming 



PERM & CUT $29.95 Reg. $40.00 (with student ID, $25.00) 
CUT & STYLE $10.00 Reg. $14.00 (with student ID, $8.00) 

FASHION AT ITS BEST 

Special Only Good with GIna, Marie, & Sally 

...Fashion Sense & Artistic Ability Go Hand in Hand 

with These Three Stylists 

SUN CONCEPTS 

Introducing me Scandanavian Suntan Bed 
Side Entrance of Hair Concepts 

Tanning was never so easy. 
No burning or drying effects that the sun gives you 

MEMBERSHIP $20 for 6 visits • NON-MEMBERSHIP $5 a visit 

SWEDISH ESALEN MASSAGE 

Wtio can benefit? 
TV People suffering from stress (massage is the 
stressbuster) -i, Body Builders t, Runners and Aerobic 
Club Members tt People who want to feel their best. 
RATES: One Hour, $20.00, Half Hour, $15.00. Foot 
Massage, $7.00. 

Massage with Student ID, $15.00 for One Hour 
-'!Lfl"Z'^l^jo. ^V^'LABLE 



FHMSO officers 

announced, 

club plans detailed 

Officers of the Food and Hospitali- 
ty Management Student Organization 
were elected last spring. They are: 
president, Kathy ZIockie; vice president, 
Karen Daniels; secretary. Ken Morgan; 
treasurer, Jean Warner. 

Keith Meyer has been appointed 
temporary parUmentatian. 
FAH stndents welcome to Join 

Any student involved in any food 
and hospitality program is welcome to 
join the organization, according to Mrs. 
Vivian P. Moon, faculty adviser to the 
group. 

FHMSO, she said, is the oldest on 
the campus and has been in existence 13 
years. 

One of the goals of the club is to 
help every student in the foodsprograms 
have a friendly, caring, accepted ex- 
perience in their two-year training ex- 
perience at the College, she said. 

Another goal is to give every stu- 
dent an opportunity to develop in 
leadership so that they may become 
comfortable in participating in their 
professional organizations. 
Opportnnity to eich 

The club gives every student an op- 
portunity to improve his or her food 
preparation and service techniques 
beyond the classroom and to add to his 
or her finances for educational tours or 
to assist in educational costs by assisting 
in extra catering events. 

The club is worlcing on a Big 
Brother and Big Sister program which is 
assiping a senior to an underperson 
in the same field. The big sister or big 
brother advises them about college Kv- 
ing, activities, and anything regarding 
college life. Some may keep in touch 
even after graduation. 

Among projects they are working 
on is a handboolc full of information on 
summer jobs for their summer co-op ex- 
perience which will also include 
philosophies and goals of the club and 
the faculty, responsibilities of officers, 
dress code, student responsibihties as 
far as class participation, facilities, 
educational tours, financial supporters, 
club meetings and details, and a picture 
of officers. 

Meetings are held every third 
Wednesday at 2 p.m. and every first 
Thursday at 12 p.m. The next meeting 
wiU be held next Thursday at noon. 

A new officer position that will be 
added to the club is social chairman- 
news reporter who will keep a scrap- 
book and report news to the 
Spotlight. 



Bus trip planned 
to Baltimore's 
Inner Harbor 

A bus trio to Baltimore's Inner 
Harbor is being planned for Saturday 
Oct. 26, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

The bus will depart from the 
Lifelong Education Center at 7 a.m. 
and will return from Baltimore at 8 
p.m. During the day, tourists are free to 
do what they want. There is no planned 
schedule. 

The cost for students, faculty, and 
aluimni is SIS. The general fee is $20. 

The trip is sponsored by the Col- 
lege Activities Office. 

Interested persons should be 
aware, Mrs. Fremiotti said, that money 
is not refundable and that "the only 
way of reserving a seat is by paying". 

Deadline for registration is 
Wednesday, Oct. 16. Reservations may 
be made by telephoning the Recreation 
Center, Ext. 763, or by telephoning 
327-4763. 

IM soccer sign-ups 
being accepted 

"Anyone interested in intramural 
soccer may still sign up in the Recrea- 
tion Center, Room A137 in the Lifelong 
Education Center or in Room 106 in the 
Gym," according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

Individuals or teams are needed. 
Information about intramural soccer is 
available from Mrs. Fremiotti whose of- 
fice is on the first floor in the gym. 



Save Water! 
Check leaky 
faucets...! 




You haven't had a Hoagie 

until you've had a 

HOBY 

HOBY'S HOAGIES 
and PIZZA 

508 Filth Avenue 

2 blocks north of WACC, 

across from Horns Svc. Bevsrags 

322-5455 

Free Delivery 

LImllsd Area • Minimum Order $4.00 

20% off aU sandwiches 

with validated student ID 

Expires Sept. 30, 1985 

OPEN 11 A.M. to 1 A.M. 
7 DAYS A WTEEK 



Flag football referee clink tonight 

Students and others who want to be a referee for intramural flag football 
must attend a meeting from 5 to 7 p.m. today at the athletic field, according to 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

In case of rain, the meeting will be held in the gym, she added. 

Mrs. Fremiotti noted that those interested "should bring appropriate 
clothing and a pencil." She emphasized, "This is a must show for those wanting 
to referee." 

Flag football players required 
to attend clinic this week 

Flag football participants must attend one of the flag football cUnics being 
held tomorrow or Wednesday at the athletic field (weather permitting), accor- 
ding to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

The clinics will be conducted from 4 to 8 p.m. In case of rain, the clinics 
will be held in the gym. 

"If you are a member on a team, you must attend at least one of these 
clinics," Mrs. Fremiotti stressed. "Bring appropriate clothing and a pencil," 
she said to prospective players. 

Those who have questions or problems, she said, should contact her at 
Room 108 in the gym by 4 p.m. today -or they may contact her tomorrow or 
Wednesday at the athletic field. 

Flag football, she said, is sponsored by the College Activities Office and the 
Center for Lifelong Education. 



SPOTLIGHTDMoiilir, Sept. 23, IMSD? 



Fut, Fret Deliver; ,£•„,„, 



LIMITED DELIVERY AREA 

1303 Washington Blvd. 
Phone: 322-2022 



$2.00 off aa; li-ioch, 3-ilem or more piiii 
One Coupon Per Pim 

Expires Sept. 29, 1985 

ler pays sales lax and bottle fieposilf 



Open for Lunch 

1:00 a.m. Sunday ■ Thanday 
- 2 a.m. Friday & Saturday 



"1 



YOU DONT HAVE 
TO FEEL GUILTY 
ABOUT HAVING AN 
ABORTION... 

Let your child live-we'll help you. 

If you or someone you care about 
is goir\g through an unwanted preg- 
nancy, please think twice about the 
right thing to do. The men who made the 
laws saying you can kill your unborn child 
won't have to deal with the consequences of 
your actions, you will. We love you and your 
child and want to help you in any way we 
can. Please get in touch with us right 
away. You can never restore a life 
that's gone. 

Birthright Inc. 

302 East Third St. 

Williunsport, Pa. 17701 

Phone 322-8215 

n and the alternatives. 



POPCORN WM 

given oat list week 
by dentil hygiene 
student] to pro- 
mote NiliontI 
Dental Hygieae 
Week. Attached to 
bigs of poptom 
were ippointmenl 
cards for the Den- 
tal Hygiene CUnic. 
Here, Frances A. 
Dardich, dental 
hygiene slodeni 
from Lewisborg, 
hinds popcorn to 
Harold L. Newton, 
griphic arts in- 
stroclor, 

[SPOTLIGHT 
pholo by LeRoy F. 
Whitmire Jr.J 




Susquehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 



The Susquehanna Room's menu 

for the week starting today, Monday, 

Sept. 23, is presented as furnished by 

the Susquehanna Room management. 

DaUj BraUdul 

Scrambled eggs, 59'; hash browns, 55'; 
home fries, 55'; pancakes, $1.29; French toast, 
99'; waffles, 99'; sausage, 79'; MufBn Supreme, 
J1.09; Croissant Surprise, $1.39; Colorado pita 
pocket, $1.S9. 

Di% Salad Bar 

Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomatoes, 
onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, 
bacoo bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple 
butter, Jello, potato salad, com relish. 

Today, Monday, Sept. U 
Lonch 

Rigatoni in meat sauce, Italian bread, 
$2.19; Chicken nuggets, potato and vegetable, 
$2.89. 

Soap 
Beef barley or tomato rice. 

DlBoer 
BBQ ribs, pouto, vegeuble, $2.79; Sauer- 
braten, Spaetzle, vegetable, $2.89. 
Sandwkbn 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; giillcd cheese, $1.49; turkey 
hoagie, $1.79; French fries. 55'. 

Tiesda;, Sept. 24 
Laocb 

Kielbasi, pierogi, potato pancakes, $2.39; 
filled sirloin, gravy, potato, vegetable, $2.39. 
Soap 
Cream of mushroom or minestrone. 

Diaaer 
Roast pork, gravy, potato and vegetable, 
$2.59; Imposler Lobster, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.59. 

Saidwickei 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 

$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with lopping, 70'; Am. 

hoagie, $1.49; chili dog, 89'; ham and egg, 

$1.59; Western egg, $1.39; French fries, 55'. 



Wedaeiday, Sept. 25 
Lancb 

Spanish rice, pork cutlet, Italian bread, 
$2.39; glazed ham, fruit sauce, potatoes, 
vegeublc,$2.39. 

Soap 

French onion or New JBngland clam 
chowder. 

DInaer 

Roast chicken (,Vi), filling, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.59; enchiladas, potatoes, 
vegeuble, $2.59. 

Sandwkhet 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping. 70*; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; bacon<heese dog, 79°; ham 
salad in pita, $1.59; chicken hoagie, $1.59; 
French fries, 55'. 

Thgnday, Sept. 26 
Lancb 

MuUigan Stew, potatoes. Kaiser roll, 
$2.59; fried clam strips, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.59. 

Soap 
Chicken noodle or cream of potato. 

DtaiDer 
Stuffed shells, sausage, Italian bread, 
$2.89; roast sirloin tip, gravy, potatoes, 
vegeuble, $2.89. 

Saodwickei 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; corned beef/rye, $1.59; taco, 99*; 
fish sandwich, $1.29; French fries, 55'. 



Friday, Sept. 27 
Uncb 

Turkey breast, gravy, pouio, vegeuble, 
$2.59; tuna patties, poutoes, vegeuble, $2.59. 
Soap 

Chili or vegeuble beef. 
Saadwickei 

Quarter pounder, J1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70"; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; steak and cheese,$1.79; ham 
club, $1.79; veal parmesan, $1.79; French fries, 
55'. 



SaSPOTLIGHTDMoida;, Sept. U, IMS 

Job 
Opportunity 

The following ii\formalion this 
week is provided by Donald S. Shade, 
director of financial aid. Questions 
should be directed to him in the Finan- 
cial Aid Office in the Academic Center. 

The Williamsport branch of the 
U.S. Postal Service is looking for nine 
student employees to work on a tem- 
porary basis. Eligible students must be 
enrolled full-time, must maintain at 
least a 2.0 grade point average, and 
must demonstrate financial need. 

Daytime, evening, and night hours 
are available, and the number of hours 
will vary from week to week. The rate of 
pay is $5.00 per hour. 

Interested students should contact 
the Financial Aid Office as soon as 
possible so that names can be submitted 
to the Harrisburg office for review and 
approval. 




BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Sept. 23 through Sunday, Sept. 29 
SPECIAL DAYS THIS WEEK 

Wednesday... Yom Kippur 

MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 24, Room 218, 
Academic Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau (GET)... noon, tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 2A,see notice 
at usual meeting place for change of location. 

Narcotics Anonymous... 7 to 10 p.m., this Wednesday, Sept. 25, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association (SGA)... Executive, 4 p.m., tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Sept. 24, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

ACTIVITIES 

Bake sale... 8 a.m. until 7, this Wednesday, Sept. 23, lobby of Academic 
Center, sponsored by Gamma Epsilon Tau. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CROP Walk for Hunger... Sunday, Oct. 20, an afternoon event in 
Williamsport. Additional information to be pubUshed soon. 

Peer Referral Center... Room 105, Gymnasium, open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., 
Monday through Thursday and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Fridays. 
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: DEAOUNE IS FRIDAY 

December graduates... Deadhne to file petition to graduate at the Student 
Records Window, Academic Center, is this Friday. 



Le Jeune Chef menus for week reported 

Le Jeune Chef luncheons are served Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Friday, from II a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Today, Monday, Sept. 23 

Soup du jour (onion au gratin), cup 85 cents. 

Light luncheon: taco salad platter, roll, beverage, J2.35. 

Special for the day: vegetable/cheese stromboli, herb sauce, antipasto, 
salad, bread, beverage, S3.25. 

Desserts: fresh orange sorbet, 65 cents; peppermint souffle with bittersweet 
chocolate sauce, 75 cents; assorted pies, 75 cents. 
Toesdiy, Sept. 24 

Soup du jour: vichyssoise, 75 cents a cup and 80 cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon: endive and bacon salad, roll, beverage, $2.25. 

Special for the day: chicken breasts with orange and leek sauce, butter 
penne, Italian stir-fry vegetables, bread, beverage, $3.45. 

Desserts: pineapple upside down cake, 70 cents; frozen yogurt, 65 cents; 
fresh apple pie, 75 cents. 

Wedneadiy, Sept. 25 

Soup du jour: cream of tomato soup, 75 cents a cup, 80 cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon: wheat berry salad, roll, beverage, $2.25. 

Special for the day: veal ragout with crepes and sage, warm spinach and 
basil salad, Italian canots, roll, beverage, $3.65. 

Desserts: chocolate hazlenut cake, 70 cents; kumquat gelato, 65 cents 
Friday, Sept. 27 

Soup du jour: chicken noodle, 75 cents a cup, 80 cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon: fresh fruit platter with sherbert, muffin, beverage, $2.35. 

Special for the day: beef stroganoff over noodles, winter mix or asparagus 
rolls, beverage, $3.45. 

Desserts: assorted pies, 65 cents; jelly roll, 70 cents; English trifle, 75 cents. 



luiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiirmiinim 



GRADUATING IN DECEMBER? 

This Friday is the deadline for fil- 
ing a petition to graduate. Students 
who plan to graduate in December 
should check at the Student Records 
Window, first floor, Academic Center, 
before Friday. 



Roller skating party 
to be this Thursday 

A roller skating party sponsored by 
the Intramural Athletics Section will be 
held this Thursday at Skating Plus, on 
Via Bella in downtown Williamsport. 

Skating begins at 8 p.m. and con- 
tinues until midnight, according to Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities. 

The skating party is free to students 
of the College who show validated ID 
cards. Skate rental is 75 cents. 

Mrs. Fremiotti said students are 
being reminded that they skate at their 
own risk. 

Tables not clean; 
students are warned 

A large number of students are ig- 
noring the responsibility of removing 
trays and other items from tables in the 
Susquehanna Room, according to John 
Vitali, food service manager for the Sus- 
quehanna Room. 

"There are signs posted. The signs 
state that taking trays and so on should 
be taken to the drop point. We're going 
to enforce it this year," Vitali said. 

Vitali added, "Those who don't 
comply may be restricted from using the 
Susquehanna Room." 

Emphasizing that he did not wish 
to sound negative, Vitali commented he 
and other staff enjoyed students coming 
to use the room. "We've bad a good 
year with nice comments," he said. He 
noted also that he has enjoyed working 
with the Student Government Associa- 
tion with dances. 



Olio's 

College 
Corner 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Phone 322-1321 

HOURS • Mon. thru Thnrs. 
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Open for Breakfast 

ir ir if: 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
and win a half sub 

Four winners 
every week 

• • • 

Your favorite Subs and 

Burgers the way you like 'em 

Come on over and get 
somethin' good to eat! 




flfliASC A, 



OTLIGHT 



Mondi;, Stpl. 30, 19SS • Vol. 21, No. t • 8 Pign 
WlUitmiport Arei Commnnil; CoUesc • WUUuniport, Pi. 17101 



Hundreds of firefighters expected 
here for Tire College Weekend' 



According to Grant L. Martin, 
coordinator of service agency and cer- 
tification programs, the College wiU of- 
fer a special program for firefighters 
from all over the state this coming 
weekend. 

The program is titled "Fire College 
Weekend "and is held in conjunction 
with the Central Area Fire Chiefs' 
Association. 

Martin said he expects an enroll- 
ment of about 800 firefighters ~ the 
largest number in the program's four- 
year history. 

The program offers both classroom 
and practical exercises in areas such as 
vehicle rescue, aricraft crash rescue and 
firefighting, and water rescue, 
classroom mstruction will be held at 
the College and the practical exercises 
will be held at various locations 
throuKfaout the city. 



Martin stated, "Fire College 
Weekend is held in an atmosphere of 
professionalism. In participating in the 
program, firefighters are able to prepare 
themselves in specific fields which will 
better enable them to serve their local 
communities, to save lives and preserve 
property." 

Seats available 
for bus trip 
to Inner Harbor 

. There are still plenty of seats 
available for the bus trip to Baltimore's 
Inner harbor, but Robert A. Young, 
Recreation Center assistant, said last 
week he is urging those interested to get 
their reservations in as soon as possible. 

■■■ Please Tarn to Pair 3 




Media Center gets new equipment 
The College Media Cealer has received new eqnipmenl. The Center, 
operated by A. Neale Winner, coordinator of iDstmctional media, and his 
sUff, ii on the second floor of the Letining Resonrces Center. The Media 
Ccntfr pliynl t pirt In the College's marketing effort this put sammer. See 
related story, Page J. fSPOTUGHT p/ioloj 



'Alcohol spotchecks' reflect alarming rate of DUI arrests 



By Cynthia E. A. Hartranft 
Of The SPOTLIGHT SUff 

Seventy-four people die every day 
due to alcohol related aaidents in the 
United States. 

In addition, another 1,800 are 
critically injured. 

This is the eqivalent of 747 jumbo 
jets, fully loaded, crashing - one every 
other day. If this were a common oc- 
curence, would you fly in a 747? But, 
still, people get behind the wheel, intox- 
icated, every day. 
300 DUI arrests 

In Williamsport in 1985 there have 
been three traffic deaths. All were driv- 
ing under the influence (DUI) related. 
There have also been over 300 DUI ar- 
rests in the past 12 months. 

Recently in Williamsport, alcohol 
spotchecks have been initiated due to 
the alarming rate of arrests for this 
area. According to Sgt. Gary L. 
Mayers, of the Williamsport Police 
Department, spotchecks will have an ef- 
fect on the number of drunk drivers 
because of the "perception of possibility 
of arrest". Statistics show that many 
people have driven drunk between 200 
to 2,000 times before ever being ar- 
rested. 

In the past few months since the 



checks have begun, there have been 18 
arrests from five checkpoints. 
Namber determines checkpoints 

Checkpoints are determined by the 
amount of DUI arrests, accidents, and 
fatalities in each district. (There are 15 
reporting districts in the Williamsport 
area.) This data is fed into a computer 
and correlated with times. Checkpoints 
are then set up where high numbers of 
drunk drivers tend to frequent. 
What happens at checkpoint 

When coming upon an alcohol 
spotcheck, drivers are asked to stop and 
wait in line. An officer asks the driver if 
he or she has been drinking. While the 
officers talk, they are looking for signs 
of intoxication. If the officer feels the 
driver is okay he will thank the driver 
for cooperating and the driver continues 
on his or her way. 
May ran a test 

If the officer feels the driver may be 
under the influence of alcohol he will 
ask the driver to step out of the car so 
he can run the horizontal gaze 
nystagmus test. 

This test consists of a penlight used 
to follow eye movement in order to 
determine if that eye movement is 
"jerky". If this test appears to be 
positive, the driver will then be given a 



preliminary breath test. For this, the 
driver is asked to blow into a small por- 
table machine which indicates the 
amount of alcohol in the system. 

Then, the divided attention test is 
given. For this, the driver is asked to 
walk a straight line and turn around. 
The mental and physical test follows; 
the driver may be asked to stand on one 
leg. Throughout all of these pro- 
ceedings, the driver is being videotaped. 
Videotapes »f important 

The videotapes are important 
because even if the driver's blood 
alcohol level is acceptable, the driver 
may appear to be intoxicated and can 
be held for court. If the driver fails 
these tests, he or she is taken to the 
hospital for a blood alcohol test. If the 
driver is too intoxicated to be arraigned, 
he or she will then be put in jail for the 
night. 

In the near future, the area police 
are anticipating on-the-scene blood tests 
using paramedics or other hospital per- 
sonnel. 

What a conviction conid mem 

A conviction of drunk driving is a 
misdemeanor of the second degree and 
requires a minimum 48-hour jail stay 
and a S300 fine. Repeat offenders face a 



mandatory minimum sentence of 30 
days for a second conviction, 90 days 
for a third, and one year for any subse- 
quent convictions. 

Convictions will automatically sus- 
pend the driver's license for a year and 
require attendance at an Alcohol 
Highway Safety School at the driver's 
expense. 

The new law, effective Jan. 14, 
1983 is know as Act 289, The Driving 
Under The Influence Law, and was 
developed by the Pennsylvania Gover- 
nor's Task Force on Drunk Driving. 

Drinking under the influence is 
determined by a person's Blood Alcohol 
Content(BAC) as determined by direct 
analysis of blood. Evidence of being in- 
toxicated is .10% (BAC). For a person 
weighing 160 pounds to reach a that 
level, he or she would have to drink five 
12-ounce beers or five 3-ounce servings 
of wine or 5 one-ounce servings of hard 
liquor. For lighter persons, BAC would 
be proportionally higher; for heavier 
persons, BAC would be proportionally 
lower. 

Pletse see Page 5 

for 
Rdaled Stories 



laSPOTUGHTDMoidij, Scfl. 3«, IW 

Whaddya' say...? 

The Question: Do you think the sobriety checks for 
drivers are fair? Why or why not? 

Photot ind Intcrvlaws by LaRoy S. Whitmir* Jr. 




Lorl A. Heim, human services stu- 
dent from Trevorton: "I don't think It Is 
fair. The police should have a good 
reason to pull sonnebody over." 



Tina M. Barrett, floriculture stu- 
dent fronn LeRoy: "Yes, It Is fair. II Is 
the job of the police to protect the peo- 
ple." 




Jeff R. Hostelly, mathematical 
computer science student from Dan- 
ville: "It Is a violation of your civil 
rights. You should not be pulled over 
for no reason at all. What v/\\\ be next?" 



Waller R. Crawford, food and 
hospitality management student from 
Sellnsgrove; "They have their reasons. 
You shouldn't be out drinking and driv- 
ing." 





Anthony P. Cusate, broadcasting 
student from Hazelton: "When you are 
drinking, you shouldn't be driving." 



Michelle Harrison, general studies 
student from Williamsport: "I think it is 
fair because of all the accidents caus- 
ed by drunk drivers." 



Contributions for the next issue of... 

W.A.C.C. Horizons 

.poetry...photography...drawlng8... essays, etc. 

now being accepted In SPOTLIGHT office 

Room 7, Academic Center 



Exercise the privilege: vote 

[Letters to SPOTLIGHT readers may be sent or delivered to the 
SPOTLIGHT office. Room 7, Academic Certter. Letters should be concise and 
not exceed 300 words. The right to edit with notification to the letter writer is 
reserved by this newspaper. Opinions expressed are those of the writer whose 
name is published at the end of the letter. No letter will be published without a 
name.] 



To SPOTLIGHT readers: 

There is about a week left for Individuals to register to vote in order to par- 
ticipate In the November 1 985 election. Registering Is a simple matter and can 
be done through the mall. One need only request a mall in registration form, 
complete It, and mail It to the appropriate county office. If a person is going to 
be away from home and cannot vote In person, then an absentee ballot should 
be requested. 

Voter participation is surprisingly low! Even In the recent presidential 
election, only slightly more than half of the elglble voters actually votedl Per- 
sons not registered to vote and persons who do not vote do not carry much 
weight or Influence with elected public officials - nor should they. In my opi- 
nion much of the recent problem with the sponsorship question is due to the 
fact that school boards are isolated from the citizens who elected them and 
therefore do not need to be responsive to them. 

Students constitute a large pressure group, but due to 
apathy are not seen as such as evidenced by how the school boards opted not 
to continue sponsoring new and part time students. 

Free and low cost education was created as it was felt an educated 
citizenry was important to continue the United States as a free, democratic 
society. Educated Individuals have an obligation to participate In the governing 
of our local communities, states, and nation, and the very minimum Is to 
register to vote and exercise this privilege by voting. 

Please contact the Peer Information and Referral Center In Room 105, 
Gymnasium, for further information. 

Lawrence W. Emery Jr. 
DIractor, Advlssmant and Caraar Sarvlcas 



Alfred L. Hauser 
did mace machining 

A Correction 

A report in last week's 
SPOTLIGHT about the College mace 
indicated that Alfred L. Hauser, 
associate professor of machine tool 
technology, was responsible for 
preparation of the semi-precious 
stones. That information was incorrect. 

Instead, Lynn Harland, former 
machine shop instructor, was responsi- 
ble for the development of that phase 
of the mace. 

Hauser was responsible for the in- 
tricate machining of the mace. 

Any Inconvenience caused to 
those concerned is regretted. 



S.N.O.W. volunteers 
for two events 

A Correction 

A report in last week's 
SPOTLIGHT indicated that the Student 
Nurses of the Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College (W.A.C.C.) were going 
to hold a hunter screening course and 
were organizing a Bloodmobile visit in 
October. That information was not cor- 
rect as presented. 

In fact, the group is not organizing 
the events but is volunteering for them. 

The SPOTLIGHT regrets any in- 
convenience to the members of the 
group or to its adviser. 



SPOTLiaHT 
Monday, S*pl. 30, 1985 - Vol. 21, No. 6 

The SPOTUGHT is publlstied eacti Monday morning of ttie academic year, ex- 
cept (or College vacations, by Journalism and other Interested students of The 
Vi/liilamsport Area Community College. 

Office; Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 W. Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 
17701, Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Extension 221. 



THE STAFF 
Wanna F. Brown, Managing Editor 
Sandra L. Musgrave. Edilofial Page Editor 
LeRoy S, Whltmlre Jr.. Pt}olography Editor 
Kathy L. Cobb, Administrative Affairs Reporter 
Keiiy S, Harrold, Student Affairs Reporter 
Cynthia E. A. Hartranft, Advertising Director 

Lyie A, Wagner, Production Coordinator 
Timothy F Neidig, PMT Darl<room Tecnnician 

REPORTERSfSTAFF ASSOCIATES 

Galene M. Castiebury, Catherine A. Hannon, Susan R. Kaliansrud, Joel J 
Mader. Lisa E Secrlst, MIndy L. Shaffer Faculty adviser; Anthony N. Cilio. 



Theory in action: 

College develops 

- and uses - 

marketing plan 

to fight 

enrollment slump 

According to Dr. William J. Mar- 
tin, dean of student services, last year, 
when the College began to suffer from 
sponsorship difficulties, enrollment 
began to drop - at one point, even as 
much as 48 percent. 

To rectify the situation, members 
of the College administration began to 
take a long, hard look at what could be 
done to get more students to attend. 
Medii-mix plan evolves 

Then, a mass marketing/advertis- 
ing plan was drawn up and tested. Used 
were many facets of advertising media 
-many for the first time for the College. 

Perhaps most noticeable was the 
development of television commercials. 
All were prepared in-house, m the Col- 
lege's Media Center, on the second floor 
of the Learning Resources Center. 

Dr. Martin stated, "There was no 
other way to counteract the negative 
press the College was receiving during 
the sponsorship dilemma than with face- 
to-face contact." 

Contribntions paid for advertising 
So, with "the many generous contribu- 



lioDS" received from benefactors within 
the community, the College waj able to 
advertise on television. 

Dr. Martin and Dr. Miles 
Williams, dean of employee and com- 
munity relations, were responsible for 
determmmg where to air the commer- 
cials, the audience, and how the com- 
mercials were to be presented. After 
much consideration, the ads were slated 
to be aired on two Wilkes-Bane based 
sUtions, WNEP-TV, Channel 16, and 
WBRE-TV, Channel 28, for a six-week 
period. 

The College also arranged for the 
commercials to be shown on local cable 
television. 

Frederick T. Gilmour, executive 
director of the College Foundation, 
because of his experience in the field, 
was asked to help write and direct the 
commercials. He was aided by Steven 
McDonald, an employee of the Media 
Center. 
'Unique approach' osed 

Dr. James P. Rice, associate dean 
for educational advancement, who 
worked on the project as well, said that 
in making the advertisements, they used 
a "unique approach... For example, we 
picked a program and elaborated on 
how it related to the student as a per- 
son. The commercial projected a 
positive image of the College." 

According to Dr. Martin, other 
methods were used to advertise the Col- 
lege as well. For example, the College 
instituted the use of a toll-free telephone 
number, 1-800-FOR-WACC. This 
resulted in more than 100 inquires from 
potential students. 



The College continued to advertise 
in newspapers; this type of media ex- 
posure was to become more widespread 
across the state. Dr. Martin said 
"cluster ads" were being used to adver- 
tise groups of related programs and that 
a new advertisuig theme was developed. 
Theme developed 

"A Different Kind of Campus" 
began to show up in newspapers all 
across the state, emphasizing in- 
dividuaUty: a college where students can 
"come in, get the tools of the trade, and 
go out into the job market." 

Radio advertismg was utihzed on a 
local basis. According to Dr. Martin, 
radio station WILQ offered free radio 
spots for promoting the College. Taking 
part in this project were Martin; 
WiUiamsport Mayor Stephen Lucasi, 
and former SGA president Steven D. 
Metzker, of WiUiamsport. 

For the first time, the College also 
coordinated a concentrated off-site 
recruiting effort. According to Dr. 
Martin, adminstration analyzed the 
state last July, and decided to send 
recruiters out to three areas: Wilkes- 
Barre/Scranton, Harrisburg, and Al- 
toona. 

Mailings were sent out in advance, 
mvitmg prospective students to small 
receptions where presentations were 
made by College recruiters. Dr. Martin 
said he expects the College to send out 
recruiters again in early Spring 1986. 

He said, "We turned up a lot of 
students - more for January 1986 than 
for this year... especially m the Al- 
toona/Johnstown area." 

Dr. Martin said, "Our enrollment 



SPOTUGHTDMoBdi;, 8<pl. M, mSDj 

Is down 12 percent this semester. In 
terms of scheduled returning students, 
we were way off. Although we don't 
like living with this shortfall, I think we 
can be amazed when we sit back and ex- 
amine what we did this year - and 
where we ended up. Our survival can 
only be attributed to the incredible ef- 
fort put forth by Admissions, the Foun- 
dation, the Career and Advisement 
Center, and many other admmistrative 
departments within the College." 

Gihnour noted that in order to 
compete with other state institutions 
when tuition is competitive, the main 
objective is to sell quaUty - a goal set 
for the new advertismg/marketing cam- 
paign. 

Dr. Martin added, "In competing 
with other colleges, we have got to have 
a cost advantage. In some cases, we 
have that by a narrow margin. In 
others, we have none. Although our 
research shows that money was not an 
impediment for students who did not 
return or apply, we are going to work 
very hard to bring student costs as low 
as possible." 

He said he felt sure that the new 
mass marketing effort, coupled with the 
development of new programs and the 
College's every attempt to lower student 
costs would help paint a more optimistic 
future enroUment for the College. 

As for the long range focus. Dr. 
Martin said he beUeves the College will 
become more service-oriented on a 
statewide basis. He said, "I think this 
post-sponsorship marketmg approach is 
the beginning of a new age for the Col- 



Peer Information & Referral Center 

Complete Confidentiality 



Room 105 
Gymnasium 



If you have a problem, 

come and talk to ua 

whether the problem 

la major or email. 



HOURS 

Monday - Thursday; 10:00 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Friay: 10:00 am. to 4 p.m. 

Closed Weekends 

Students Helping Fellow Students 



p H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h ■ ■ 

rmEE PIIIAI I 

I Buy einy size Little Caesars 

■ Original round pizza at regular 
. price, get the identical pizza 
I FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GLVNT PLAZA 

327-8600 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

One coupon per customer. Cany out only. At participating locations, ja 



!) 



W.A.C.C. itadeaU nve 
■dditlonil 10% only with 
itadcnt I.D. ud (hti id. 



DENNIS BUCK HAIRSTYLING 



I "Pro/esiional HaliityUng" 

- ,„ Phone 326-3608 

IVh oH with TiUdited itudcnl ID 
Offer Eipim Oct. 12, 1915 



325 Walnut Street 
Only (4) Blocks from W.A.C.C. 
(BetwecD Third & Fonrth Strecia) 



Full-stylt Salon for Mm and Womtn , 

Hiintyliat $6 
Hiintflc w/ilumpoo SI 

$1.00 off any hairstyle 

or style & shampoo with 

validated student ID 



Mod. k Fri. 9 (.m. - 1 p.m. 

Taei., Wed., Than, k Sit. 9 a.m. to i p.m. 




Open 6 a.m. to midnight 

Monday thru Friday 

0pm Saturday I p.m. to 3 a.m. 



BARRY'S 

D) Barry says: We won't cook a borger before iti time. 



Brooklyn Style Eatery fj 

•a unique eating experience '/ 
•best breakfast in town "/ 
•arcade and pool table 
•Daily Specials 



PHONE 
323-FOOD 



234 Park St. Just across from 
the new east parking lot 






4DSParLlGHTDMaiili;, Scpl. M, I9>5 



i 



\ 



'9 

i 




Hawaiian Look 
comes to campus 



The Hawaiian Look hit the College 
campus this semester and can be seen on 
students and faculty alike. The 
Hawaiian shorts are often called 
"Jams" - which is actually a designer 
name. 

Jams have been at the Shore for at 
least two years. Joy R. Porter, retail 
management student from Lock Haven, 
said she was surprised that it took so 
long for the styles to get to 
Williamsport. 

She added that Jams and Hawaiian 
shirts have been worn mainly at the 
Shore - which was the consensus of 
most of those interviewed. 

Why are these items of apparel 
popular? They're comfortable, colorful, 
and they go with anything. 

The shirts and shorts are, of 
course, being worn on other college 
campuses. 



Joy R. Porter, retail nunagement stu- 
dent from Lock Hiven. 



Sharon M. Crawford, word processing 
ilDdent from New Albany 



$2.00 off aoy l(-iach, 3-ileiii or fflort pizzt 
One Coupon Per Pitza 
™ Expires Oct. 6, 1985 

FtBl, Free Delivery fCusmmer pays sales tax and bollte deposit! 



LIMITED DELIVERY AREA 



1303 Washington Blvd. 
Phone: 322-2022 



11:00 a.m. - 
11.00 •.m. 



Open for Lunch 

1:00 a.m. Saoday - Thursday 
- 2 a.m. Friday i Saturday 



College awarded federal grants 
for equipment, program development 




Snacks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 

ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIGHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



«^l^ 
"t 



BENSON 




Off! mini, ^ 
/BMnmarket 



Co r_n_er_of_ 3rd _a_n_d May n a rd Sts. 



fe OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOO 



The College has been awarded 
federal grant monies to be used for the 
purchase of new, "state of the art" in- 
structional equipment and for the 
development of six new curriculums, ac- 
cording to Dr. Grant M. Berry, dean of 
development. 

Dr. Berry stated that the vocational 
education grants for the new equipment 
total $622,883. 

He said that the programs to be 
enhanced by the equipment acquisitions 
are: air conditioning and refrigeration, 
drafting, electrical technology, machine 
tool technology, machinist general, ser- 
vice and operation of heavy construc- 
tion equipment, welding, and word pro- 
cessing. 
Keeping np with standard] 

According to Dr. Berry, the pur- 
pose of these acquisitions is to keep Col- 
lege programming in hne with industry 
standards, thus allowing students to 
train in technologies that are currently 
used in industry. 

Dr. Berry commented, "Of all the 
money available in Pennsylvania this 
year for instructional equipment, the 
College got 30 percent. That amounts to 
a tremendous amount of money. 

"Considering that we are only one 
of 72 institutions which qualify for grant 
monies, I think that's a tremendous ac- 
compUshment for the College." 



To snpport program development 

The College has also been awarded 
vocational education funding for the 
development of six new programs in the 
amount of $168,057, according to Dr. 
Berry. These funds will support pro- 
gram development in automated 
manufacturing technology, fiber op- 
tics/laser optics, computer repair and 
maintenance, telecommunications, cer- 
tified dental assisting, and occupational 
therapy assisting. 

Dr.'Berry stated that in most cases, 
the funds approved will be used to 
employ part-time instructors for existing 
programs in order to give release time to 
present faculty members who will work 
as program developers in the new cur- 
riculums. In each instance, no training 
program now exists in these career areas 
within the 10-county area serviced by 
the College. 
Some for new bnikUng 

Instruction in each of the new pro- 
grams is slated to begin during the 
1986-87 academic year. 

Dr. Berry specified that all of the 
new programs and some of the newly 
acqmred eqmpment will oe tor use m 
the Advanced Technology and Health 
Sciences Center now under construc- 
tion. The remaining equipment will be 
used to enhance programs m existing 
buildings. 



gPOTUGHTDMndi;, Sept' M. IMSD: 




Jennifer A. Shoemiker, practical 
nursing stodent from Mon- 
tonrsTille. 



Angela L. Bennett, compoler 
science sindeni from Mon- 
tonrsville. 



Dean Middleton notes work being done 
to update 'traditional programs' 



While the new Advanced 
Technology and Health Sciences Center 
and the new programs being developed 
in conjunction with it are receiving 
recognition on a state and national 
level, Dr. James E. Middleton, dean of 
academic affairs, is stressing that atten- 
tion should be paid also to programm- 
ing which is now being upgraded as 
well. 

Dr. Middleton stated, "In the new 
programming, we are blazing the path 
for much of the technology... There 
aren't a whole lot of models to copy. 
However, I think we should not 
overlook many of our traditional pro- 
grams. We should continue to em- 
phasize many of these occupational 
areas... part-time and transfer programs 
as well as full-degree programs." 

According to Dr. Middleton, some 
of the curriculums currently undergoing 
metamorphasis are: Computer 
Operator/Microcomputer and Com- 
puter Technology, Dr. Don B. 
Bergerstock, director of business and 
computer technologies, and faculty; 
Construction Technology and Electrical 
emphasis. Dr. Ralph A. Home, director 
of construction technology, and faculty; 
Forest Technology, Wood Products, 



The ARD alternative: for first-timers 

Act 289, the drinking-under-the-influence law, provides for a one-time 
alternative to trial, conviction and mandatory jail sentencing. This law has 
presented an Accelerated Rehabihtative Disposition (ARD) program as a means 
of treating first-time offenders without going to trial. 

Some "reinforcements" have been added to the law to encourage rehabilita- 
tion and to discourage any further drunk driving by "first-time" offenders. 
However, the ARD program will not be available to drunk drivers who have 
caused serious injuries or deaths. 
Requirements to enter 

To enter the ARD program, the first-time offender must: 

- be recommended by the district attorney following a review of the driver's 
alcohol intake profile. 

~ waive the right to trial. 

-pay for any damages if an accident were involved. 

- give up his license for at least a month and possibly a year, 
-attend and pay for Alcohol Highway Safety School, a live week course 

that costs an average of $100. 

~ Uve up to all requirements or return to court to face trial and conviction. 

-understand that any second offense of drunk driving within seven years 
will be treated as a second conviction with a minimum 30-day jail term. 



APPROXIMATE BLOOD ALCOHOL PERCENTAGE 



Drtnki 




Body Weight In PoiitKh 










lOO 


120 


140 


160 


180 


200 


220 


240 




1 


04 


.03 


03 


02 


02 


02 


02 


02 




2 


.08 


.06 


.05 


.05 


04 


04 


03 


03 




3 


11 


.09 


.08 


.07 


.06 


.06 


.05 


.05 




4 


15 


12 


11 


.09 


08 


06 


07 


.06 


Danger 


5 


19 


.16 


13 


12 


11 


OS 


.09 


.06 


Zona 


6 

8 , 
9 


.23 
26 
30 


19 
22 

25 
28 


16 
19 
21 


16 

19 


13 
15 


13 
15 

19 


10 
12 

17 


.09 

13 
16 


Legally 
Drunk 



Floriculture, Nursery Management, 
Diesel Technology, and Operation of 
Heavy Equipment, Dr. Wayne R. 
Longbrake, director of natural 
resources management, and faculty; and 
Mass Communications, a pulling 
together of various components, such as 
Journalism, Broadcasting, Advertising, 
and others, Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, direc- 
tor of integrated studies, and faculty. 

The revisions and upgrading of 
such programs, according to Dr. Mid- 
dleton, are focused on "coming up with 
modem, efficient, and quality program- 
ming in those areas." 

Dr. Middleton attributes the suc- 
cess of prograin development to ad- 
ministration and faculty members whose 
hard work results in quahty programm- 
ing for the College. He said, "A lot 
more goes on behind the scenes... facul- 
ty members have a lot more respon- 
sibilities than just standing at the front 
of a classroom and instructing students. 
I have a lot of appreciation and respect 
for the faculty's tremendous contribu- 
tion in staying current in their fields and 
revising and developing their informa- 
tion. The College faculty has really been 
the key to our progress." 



PHI BETA LAMBDA 

will host a Fund Raising Sale 

Monday, Oct. 7 

through Friday, Oct, 18 




A Wide Variety of Unique Gifts from the Cariosity 
Shoppe will be featured. 

Gifts will be on display in the lobby of the Academic 
Center the week of Oct. 7. 

Orders will be taken throoghoat the week of Oct. 14 in... 

Phi Beta Lambda Office, Room 3, Lower Level 
of the Academic Center 



im_, PHI 



FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS C 
■BETA LAMBDA, INC 



PBL 



, icacsg6 ««g s wo s .s saoccso»s; 



6ogroiIiG HTDMo«<W. 8<H 3>, H»S 

Dr. Grant M. Beny Jr., dean of 
development, has announced that a pro- 
ject to develop administrative manage- 
ment capacities at the College has 
received funding through a Department 
of Education Title III grant. 

According to Dr. Berry, funds 
allocated under the grant total $477,287 
and cover a three-year period beginning 
tomorrow. This is the fourth apphca- 
tion for Title III funds made by the Col- 
lege for this particular project. 

The project involves the develop- 
ment of an information system to im- 
prove management decision-making at 
all levels of the College administration. 

Carl L. Christiansen, director of 
computer services, has been named pro- 
ject director, and is expected to devote 
approximately 60 percent of his time to 
the project. Christiansen expects the 
first two to three months to be dedicated 
to identifying tasks, responsibiities, and 
aim. Christiansen says he will appoint 
Michael M. Cunningham, a member of 
his staff, lo the position of project coor- 
dinator. 



Christiansen will report to William 
C. Allen, dean of administration, and 
to Dr. Berry. 

He said the project includes two 
components: 10 specific appUcations of 
software, which include tracking, 
maintenance, and delivery to individuals 
in functioning areas. The project will 
identify needs from a student standpoint 
and react to them. It also will have 
marketing retention capacities. Accor- 
ding to Christiansen, the program Is 
designed to best aid the student and the 
administration of the College. 

He is very enthusiastic about the 
project, saying that it will give the Col- 
lege a "leading edge" and that this is 
"state of the art programming". He 
said that those departments which will 
be directly benefitting from the project 
are Developmental Studies, Academic 
Affairs, Admissions, Records Office, 
Bursar's Office, Pubhc Relations, and 
the Office of the Dean of Educational 
Research, among others. 

Christiansen stated, "While institu- 
tions must have some type of system to 



keep its administration working 
(paychecks, records, etc.) ours will now 
have a system in an anticipatory plann- 
ing mode. We will be able to plan and 
identify the need before the need is even 
really there. This is a terrific Title III 
plan - well-organized - and there is a 
tremendous commitment from the presi- 
dent and in -bouse administration. The 
project vrill allow us to become self- 
sufficient." 

Dr. Robert L. Breduer, College 
president, called the grant award "a 
very significant achievement". The Col- 
lege, he said, has assigned a "high 
priority" status to the project. 

According to Dr. Berry, the effi- 
ciency of the entire College is expected 
to improve significantly with the suc- 
cessful completion of this project. He 
said last week that he, Christiansen, and 
Dean Allen will travel to Luzerne Coun- 
ty Community College in Nanticoke to- 
day in order to visit the developmental 
staff and the Title III staff and to 
discuss their approach to their Title III 
program. 



Funds awarded 

for project 

to develop 

information system 



Flagfootball 
schedule to be posted 

The schedule for the in- 
tramural flag football play which 
is to begin today is posted on the 
intramural bulletin board in the 
gym. 

A change was being made in 
the schedule at week's end; the 
schedule therefore was not 
available for pubUcation today. 




HOBY 

IHOBY'S HOAGIESI 
and PIZZA 

508 Fifth Avenue 

2 blocki north ot WACC, 

scroSB from Horns Svc. Bovsrage 

322-5455 

Free Delivery 

Limited Area • Minimum Order S4.0( 

20% off all sandwiches 
with validated student ID 

Expires Oct. 6, 1985 

OPEN 11 A.M. to 1 A.M. 
7 DAYS A WEEK 



Open gym, weight 
room, table temiis 
hours listed 

Open gym will be held Monday 
throu^ Thursday from 4 to 10 p.m. 
The weight room will also be open those 
times. Both will be available on Sunday 
from 5 to 9 p.m. 

On Tuesday, however, the weight 
room will be closed from 7 to 8 p.m. 
The gym will be closed that night from 7 
to 9 p.m. 

Table tennis will be held in the gym 
on Monday and Wednesday from 6 to 8 
p.m. 

College Activities Office personnel 
are reminding all those who use the 
open gym and weight room that a valid 
ID and clean gym shoes are required. 
Those wbo do not them will be asked to 
leave. 

Fall '86 applicants 
for Health Sciences 
should start now 

The time has arrived for any in- 
dividual studies student who is in- 
terested in a health sciences program for 
Fall 1986 to start the application pro- 
cess, Mrs. Davie Jane Nestarick, direc- 
tor of the Health Sciences Division, said 
last week. 

Those students should contact per- 
sonnel in the College Admissions Office 
in the Academic Center to formally app- 
ly for the selected health sciences pro- 
gram, she said. 

"If you have any questions about 
this process," she said, "please contact 
either your adviser or the Admissions 
Office." 

She said those interested should 
"please act now since the health 
sciences programs fill quickly." 



Susquehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 

The Susquehanna Room's menu 
for the week starting today, Monday, 
Sept. 23, is presented as fiimished by 
the Susquehanna Room management. 

DtOy Breikfut 

Scrambled eggs, 39'; hash browns, ii'; 
home flies, 55'; pancakes, $1.29; French toast, 
99'; waffles, 99'; sausage, 79'; Muffin Supreme, 
SI. 09; Croissant Smprise, SI. 39; Colorado pita 
pocket, $1.59. 

IHil; Sahd Bar 

Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomatoes, 
onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, 
bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple 
butter, Jello, potato salad, com reUsh. 



Todij, Mondiy, Sept. 30 
Lunch 

Manhattan steak, gravy, potatoes, 
vegetable, S2.39; shrimp quiche, small salad 
bar, $2.99. 

Soap 
Com chowder or beef noodle. 

Dioner 
Roast top round beef, gravy, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.89; spaghetti and meatballs, 
Italian bread, $2.39. 

Sandwkhei 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; turkey, $1.59; tuna salad, $1.59; 
French fries, 55'. 



Tnesdir, Oct. 1 
Lunch 

Franks and beans, with potato, $1.99; 
chicken nuggets, potato, vegetable, $2.39. 
8onp 
Chicken rice or chili. 
DfaiDcr 
Vienna veal cutlet, potato and vegetable, 
$2.89; roast pork, gravy, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.59. 

Sudwlcho 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 

$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 

hoagie, $1.49; roast beef hoagie, $1.79; chiU 

dog, 89'; grilled cheese, 79'; French fries, 55". 




Wedneidi;, Oct. 2 
Lunch 

Rigatoni/meatball, Italian bread, $2.19; 
pork/fried rice, eggroU, $2.39. 
Sonp 
Ham and bean and cream of broccoU. 

Dinner 
Chicken crepes, potatoes, vegetable, $2.59; 
golden fried clams, potatoes, vegetable, $2.79. 
Sandwiches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55°; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; ham BBQ, $1.25; steak and 
cheese, $1.79; French fries, 55'. 



Thnradiy, Oct. 3 
LoDch 

Meatloaf,pdtatoes, vegetable, $2.39; 
macaroni and cheese, vegetable, $2.19. 
Soap 
Beef barley or tomato rice. 

Dinner 
Ravioli and pork cutlet, ItaUan bread, 
$2.89; BBQ spareribs, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.89. 

Stndwicbef 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 

$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 

hoagie, $1.49; fish sandwich, $1.29; comed beef 

on rye, $1.59; BLT, $1.59; French fries, 55'. 



Fridiy, Oct. S 
Lunch 

Fish and chips, vegetable, $2.39; chicken 
pot pie, vegetable, $2.39. 
Soup 

Cream of mushroom and minestrone. 
Sudwlcho 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; ham and cheese, $1.59; veal 
paraiesan hoagie, $1.79; laco, 99';French fries, 
55'. 



Employment 
Opportunities 

Information about part-time 
employment is furnished by the Office 
of Career Services. Questions about the 
items presented here should be directed 
to that office, in the Learning 
Resources Center. 



Cunpas Reps 

KreU Software Corp., 1320 Stony 
Brook Road Stony rook, N.Y. 11790 is 
interested in hiring college students to. 
serve as campus reps for its line of 
educational computer software and 
video programs. Must have access to a 
VCR and a microcomputer. Call (800) 
245-7355. 

To point brick 

Someone needed to point brick for 
a three-story carriage house. Call 
326^)202. 

Sodil Scrrices Aidei 

The OfBce of Career Services has 
information from the United States 
Department of the Interior for Social 
Services Aides and Social Services 
Assistants in the Pacific Northwest 
Region. Both permanent and tem- 
porary. 

The Revolutionary War ended on 
Oct. 19, 1781. 



1807 



Robert E. Lee was bom Jan. 19, 



Le Jeune Chef menus for week reported 

Le Jeune Chef, the student-operated restaurant, luncheons will be served 
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The restaurant is 
closed today. 

Tomorrow, Tneiday, Oct. 1 

Soup du jour: creamy potato soup, 75 cents a cup and 80 cents a bowl. 

light luncheon: Greek style grilled lamburgers with cucumber dressing, 
three bean salad, pita bread, beverage, $2.40. 

Special for the day: chicken breast with spinach stuffing, rice pilef, 
scalloped tomatoes or glazed canots, roll, beverage, $3.25 

, Desserts: assorted pies, 75 cents; chocolate fiffed cake roll, 75 cents; fruit 
custard tah, 75 cents. 

Wedoesday, Oct. 2 

Soup du jour: beef and red wine broth, cup 75 cents, bowl 80 cents. 

Light luncheon: open face ItaUan meatball platter, petite salad, beverage, 
$2.25. 

Special for the day: shrimp stuffed peppers, juUenne canots, red beets, 
orange sauce, dinner roll, $3.55. 

Desserts: assorted pies, 75 cents; filled baked apple with whipped topping, 
60 cents; fresh coconut cake, 65 cents. 

Thanday, Oct. 3 

Soup du jour: onion soup grautine, cup 80 cents. 

Light luncheon: fresh vegetable platter with house dressing and cheese 
strips, crackers, beverage, $2.25 

Special for the day: waldorf pork, buttered noodles, snow peas or broccoU, 
rolls, beverage, $3.55 

Desserts: assorted pies, 75 cents; coffee cream filled puffs, 70 cents; graham 
cracker cream cake, 65 cents. 

Friday, Oct. 4 

Soup du jour: sherried mushroom soup, cup 75 cents, bowl 80 cents. 

Light luncheon: rice and vegetable salad in taco basket, banana mufBn, 
beverage, $3.35. 

Special for the day: barbeque chicken breast, twice stuffed potato, suc- 
cotash or herbed green beans, com bread muffin, beverage, $3.35. 

Desserts: assorted pies, 75 cents; peach cobbler, 65 cents; ginger bread with 
lemon glaze, 65 cents. 



SPOTUGHTDMoidir. 8cfL M, IMSD? 



If You Want to Use Drugs... 

That's Your Business 

If You Want to Stop 

That's Ours! 

There is Help... 

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS 

Wednesday Meetings 

7 P.M. to 8 P.M. 

Room B107 

Learning Resources Center 

(LEC) 



For Sale 
Plumbing Tools 

Mnch KWn Torp*do Ln*i, II 

HMnch Op*n lUchat BH Brae., 110 

10-Inch Kl*ln Craicnl Wranch, M 

No. 10 Tubing Cutter, $10 

Call Extension 487 
and ask for Nancy 




Creating together 
what no one can do alone 



«■■■ ■^^ririii 

416 River Avenue 



>Tjpiog(G«n«.H u In ) .Rsbbcr Stunps 
•PriTtte Mill Boies 'Kcji 
■Puiport Photos •Pholo Copies 
•Nolir; Public •Rcsome Wiitfng 



•GUI Wnpping •Picki{iiig Sgppbes 

•Picki|liig •Electronic Mill 

•Answering Service •Word Processing 

•GUtwnp Supplies •Term Pipers 



Monday thru Friday 9 a.m. ■ 6 p.m. PHONE 327-1 766 
Saturday 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

Pro1.s«lonil packaging and shipping of your matarlala In mlnutai. 
Wa'll ship your packaga via UPS or, It your packaga naada 10 gal thara quickar, wa'll 
ihip It Air Exprata for ovarnlght dallvary. 



■■■^■(^■■■■■■^■■M»j| 



HAIR CONCEPTS INC. 

300 Shiffler Ave. • Triangle Building 

Phone 323-8860 

Full Service Salon Staff 

'David Vauglin, President* 

Hair Designing iMassage 

Haircutting Suntan Bed 

Facials Mai(e-Up 

Manicuring Perming 

PERM & CUT $29.95 Reg. $40.00 (with student ID, $25.00) 
CUT & STYLE $10.00 Reg. $14.00 (with student ID, $8.00) 

FASHION AT ITS BEST 

Special Only Good with Gina, Marie, & Sally 

...Fashion Sense & Artistic Ability Go Hand in Hand 

with These Three Stylists 

SUN CONCEPTS 

Introducing the Scandanavian Suntan Bed 
Side Entrance of Hair Concepts 

Tanning was never so easy. 
No burning or drying effects that the sun gives you. 

MEMBERSHIP $20 for 6 visits • NON-MEMBERSHIP $5 a visit 

SWEDISH ESALEN MASSAGE 

Who can benefit? 
■d People suffering from stress (massage is the 
stressbuster) tr Body Builders * Runners and Aerobic 
Club Members ir People who want to feel their best. 
RATES: One Hour, $20.00, Half Hour, $15.00, Foot 
Massage, $7.00. 

Massage with Student ID, $15.00 for One Hour. 
GIFT CERTI FICATES AVAILABLE 
■■ ■ ■■ iiwawwi wi»i w«iiMMMi»»»™™ir» 



SaSPOTUGHTDMomli;, Scpl. M, IMS 

SPOTLIGHTing,.. Frederick T. Gilmour 




FREDERICK T. GILMOUR I8P0TLIGHT pbolo b; URo; 8. WkKoln Jr.| 



B; Kithy L. Cobb 
Of The SPOTUGHT SUff 



Bus trip planned to Baltimore 



Continued Jrom Page /■■■ 

Seating is confimed only by pay- 
ment, he said. If not enough persons 
make paid reservations and the bus is 
not filled, the trip will be cancelled, he 
said. 



Save Water! 
Check leaky 
faucets...! 



The trip to Baltimore's loner Har- 
bor is planned for Saturday, Oct. 26. 

The bus will depail from the 
Lifelong Education Center at 7 a.m. 
and will return from Baltimore at 8 
p.m. During the day, tourists are free to 
do what they want. There is no planned 
schedule. 

The cost for students, faculty, and 
aiuimni is $18. The general fee is $20. 

The trip is sponsored by the Col- 
lege Activities Office. 

Interested persons should be 
aware, said Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of College activities, that 
money is not refundable and that "the 
only way of reserving a seat is by pay- 
ing". 

Deadline for registration is 
Wednesday, Oct. 16. 

Reservations may be made by 
telephoning the Recreation Center, Ext. 
763, or by telephoning 327-4763. 



Cillo's ^ 

College 
Corner 

PHONE Jl 

322-1321 
1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Come on over and get 
somethin ' good to eat! 



Your favorite Subs and 
Burgers the way you like 'em 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 
Four winners -^ 
every week 
• * 

Open for Breakfast 
HOURS • Man. Ihni Thun. 
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



He designed the College seal and mace; 
is executive director of Foundation 

Frederick T. Gimoui, executive director of the College Foundation, is a 
native of Johnstown, Pa. He has resided in Williamsport since 1964. A graduate 
of Mansfield University, he received his bachelor of science degree, education, 
summa cum laude in art education in 1983. 

He had previously completed requirements at The Willianispori Area Com- 
munity College for a certificate program and a degree program: In 1966, he 
received a certificate in technical illustration and io 1974 he received an associate 
degree of arts. 

In his spare time, Gilmour enjoys photography and artwork. (Id addition, 
he currently is restoring a classic automobile.) Many of his photographs and art- 
works are owned by individuals, collectors, and professionals in New York, New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C. (private and political), and Florida, 
and the Australian government. 

Gilmour desiped a 12-foot stainless steel and marble sculpture for the 
Williamsport Technical Institute/Williamsport Area Community College Alumni 
Association for presentation to the College. The sculpture is currently being con- 
structed by the Industrial Technology Division. 

Gilmour also is responsible for designing the College mace and the College 
seal as well as for the creation of numerous educational video programs and 
educational slide programs. 

Gilmour is very active within the community. He currently is chairperson of 
the National Conference of Christians and Jews, Lycoming County Chapter, and 
second vice president of the Williamsport Rotary Club. 

As executive director of the College Foundation, he is responsible for 
developing, implementing, and maintaining a long range funding source for the 
College through a planned giving program, an endowment ftind, and a capital 
gifts program. 

His basic functions are to acquire, maintain, and distribute funds from 
private sources, businesses, corporations, foimdations, and individuals to benefit 
the programs and students of the College. 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For week oj Monday, Sept. 30 through Sunday, Oct. 6 
MEETINGS 

Gimmi Epjilon Tin... noon tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 1, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous... 7 to 8 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 2, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Phi Bell Lambda... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 1, Room 329, 
Academic Center. 

SGA Executive Committee:.. 4 to 5 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 1, Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

SGA Senate... 5 to 6 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 1, Room BI07, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

FHMSO... 2 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. I, Room 132, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CROP Walk for Hanger... Sunday, Oct. 20, b eginning at 1:30 p.m. in 
Memorial Park, Williamsport. There will be 3, 6, 10, and 22-mile courses. 

Peer Referral Center... Room 105, Gymnasium, open from 10 a.m. to 8 
p.m., Monday through Thursday and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Fridays. 

New trustees to be appointed 
by City Council 



The Williamsport City Council is 
expected in October to appoint at least 
some of the seven trustees needed for 
the College's Board of Trustees. 

The city became the College's 
sponsor during the summer, giving the 
Council the responsibility of making ap- 
pointments based on nominations of a 
committee representing the current 



trustees and the Council, with 
Assemblyman Alvin C. Bush as its 
chairman. 

According to previously published 
information, the committee received 
more than 35 applications. 

The Council is expected to take ac- 
tion on Oct. 10. 



Contributions for W.A.C.C. Horizons 

now being accepted in SPOTLIGHT office, 

Room 7, lower level, Academic Center 



Jft'ACC 



ARCH;VE3 



POTLIGHT 



Mondiy, Ocl. 7, 1985 • Vol. 21, No. 7 • 12 Ptgts* • waUimsporl Aret Commanlty CoUeft • WlUtamiport, P.. 17701 

Board of Trustees meets, approves revised budget 




PULL THE FLAG - And one of the pityen in tn intnmnral flag footbtll gime list week does Jnst that (at left). Flag 
football gamei got underway last week and continne this week. Players are being asked to check the IM BnOetin 
Board in the gym for play schedule. [SPOTUGHT photo by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. J 



The College Board of Trustees held 
its regular monthly meeting in the Col- 
lege Board Room, second floor, 
Lifelong Education Center, last Mon- 
day, Sept. 30. 

During the course of the meeting, 
the Board approved several action 
items, including the revision of the 
1985-86 College (operating and capital) 
budget; salary increments for non- 
bargaining unit personnel (excluding the 
president) for 1985-86; and bids for 
transformer system trainers and 
motor/generator system trainers. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, explained that the newly 
revised operatmg is 8.24 percent less 
than the original budget to bring the 
finances in Une with the fall enrollment 
decline. 

The original budget was 
$13,715,478; the revised budget is 
$12,585,934. The capital budget shows 
an increase of 57.79 percent as a result 
of state revenue for bond payments. 
The original budget was $2,866,844; the 
revised budget is $4,523,515. 

■■■ Please turn to Page 5 



Tall Kick-Off Dance' 
Wednesday; open to all 



College United Way fund drive 
begins today; goal set higher 



By Snsan R. Kallansmd 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

A "Fall Kick-Off Dance" spon- 
sored by Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) will 
be held this Wednesday from 9 p.m. to 
midnight in the Susquehanna Room. 

Cost of the dance is $1 for in- 
dividuals and $1.50 for couples. 

The dance, according to Paul W. 
Goldfeder, assistant professor of 
business and the organization's adviser, 
is open to all students and to the public. 
Disc jockey to be featured 

Entertainment will be provided by 
a disc jockey and refreshments will be 
sold. 

The dance will be Phi Beta Lamb- 
da's first social event of the season. 

'Horizons' included 

'Horizons', a literary supplement 
to The SPOTLIGHT is included in to- 
day's edition. 

'Horizons' will be published again 
next month. 



Goldfeder noted that Phi BeU 
Lambda's activities are numerous, m- 
cluding taking a part in the United Way 
Fund Drive with members soliciting in- 
dividual residences near the College. 

The organization, under the chair- 
manship of Tonya Boone, is sponsoring 
a sale, "The Curiosity Shoppe" in the 
Academic Center lobby starting today 
and continuing through Oct. 18, from 
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. daily with items rang- 
ing in price from $1.95 to $6. Christmas 
items will be featured. 
Workshop attended 

Lonnie Reinard, president of Phi 
Beta Lambda, said he is requesting 
those persons having books still for sale 
in the PBL office pick them up as soon 
as possible. 

Recently, four representatives from 
Phi beta Lambda and Goldfeder attend- 
ed workshops in Boalsburg in addition 
to 125 students from 17 different col- 

■■■ Please turn lo Page 4 



The- College's 1985-86 Lycoming 
United Way Fund Drive begins officially 
today with a kick-off meeting for team 
leaders, according to William C. Brad- 
shaw, director of experiential learning 
and co-chairman of the College's United 
Way effort. 

This year's campaign goal at the 
College is $8,500 ~ which represents a 
slight increase over last year's, Brad- 
shaw said. 
College was one of two 

He noted that last year the College 
"had the distinction of being one of on- 
ly two units in the county to exceed their 
campaign goal." 

This year's theme is "Love Makes 
the Difference" and is followed by the 
suggestion, he said, "that we can create 
together what no one can do alone". 

In the Spring of 1985, following a 
tragic, devastating tornado, the county 
witnessed first-hand how the United 
Way, through its member organiza- 
tions, reaches out to those in need, 
Bradshaw said. 



Diy-by-day influence Important 

Less dramatic, he added, but of 
great significance are the day-to-day, 
year-after-year activities of such 
organizations as the Crippled Children's 
Society, Hope Enterprises, the Boy 
Scouts, and the Association for the 
Blind. These, he said, are "but a few" 
of the 34 agencies supported in part by 
the United Way contributions. 

The 1985-86 campus campaign is 
being coordinated by Frederick T. 
Gilmour, executive director of the Col- 
lege Foundation, and by Bradshaw. 
Bradshaw said they begin the campaign 
"with optimism that the College will 
once again not only meet, but exceed 
the establish goal". 

Fire College Weekend 
coverage next week 

Fire College Weekend was schedul- 
ed to be held at the CoUege over the 
past weekend. More than 800 
firelighters were expected. 



2aSP0TUGHTDM«uU;, 00. 7, IMS 





The Question: What is your opi- 
nion of having a cross wall< over 
Third Street, or an underground 
tunnel, or a flashing light to help 
pedestrians crossing the street? 

Tina M. Harlan, computer science 
student from South Wllllamsporl: 
"They should have sonnething; It Is get- 
ting really difficult to cross..." 



Paul J. Zorn, civil engineering stu- 
dent from New Jersey: "They should 
have some sort of flashing light; that 
would be the most economical 
choice." 



Casandra M. Hill, computer 
science student from South 
Wllllamsport: "They need a light to 
slow traffic down." 



W haddy a ' 

SByaaa ■ 



Elaine J. Lambert, Interim director 
of College communication, of Mon- 
toursvlile: "They should at least have a 
flashing light. Crossing Third Street can 
be dangerous and I would hate to see 
someone get hurt." 



David P. Ryan, agribusiness stu- 
dent from Gransvllle Summit: "They 
should at least have a flashing light, but 
an overhead crosswalk would be the 
best choice." 



Natalie 1^. Ayers, word processing 
student from Wllllamsport: "I think It Is 
the driver's responsibility to slow 
down." 



Photos and interviews 
By LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



Food service coordinator says thanl(s; 
catering scheduie fiiied for Faii semester 

Thank you for your continued support of the food and hospitality catering 
class. We are currently filled up for the Fall semester for catered events. The 
luncheon quantity food production program Is open for your catered events 
Tuesday through Friday. 

If there Is any way we can accomodate your business meetings, special 
groups or miscellaneous functions during the luncheon hours of 1 1 a.m. to 1 
p.m., please call Ext. 369. 

Thank you for your support. 

Mr*. Suzann L. B«nn*tt 
coordinator of food tarvic* programa 

Crossing Third Street 
is dangerous 

CommanUry by Tha SPOTLIQHT 

Recently, Dr. William J. Martin, dean of student services, expressed his 
concern over student on-campus driving habits. Concerning the problem of 
safety, we are inclined to agree and are concerned about student crossing on 
Third and Susquehanna Streets. 

How many people are aware that pedestrians have the right of way? 
Ninety percent of motorists yield to pedestrians. The other 1 percent seem to 
Ignore this law and deliberately speed up to promote a 'cheap thrill' for 
themselves. 

Within the past five years, there have been two accidents involving Col- 
lege students crossing Third Street. 

The first occurred on March 31 , 1980 at 7:55 a.m. The pedestrian was 
crossing from the south side to the north side of Third. The driver said the 
woman suddenly appeared In front of his car and he never saw her. 

The second occurred on Sept. 7, 1983 at 2:55 p.m. Unlike the previous 
accident, the roadway was dry and the flashing signals were activated. The 
pedestrian was crossing from the north side of Third to the south side. The 
driver only recalled seeing someone flying over the hood of the car. 

Both accidents occurred In front of the gym. 

Several questions follow: Were the pedestrians paying attention, or were 
they trying to "beat the car"? There was no indication of speeding, but could It 
have been a driver error? 

On any given day one can see that at certain times the street is congested 
with people crossing In all directions. 

The problem Is arriving at a structural, cost-effective solution. Flashing 
hazard lights were Installed in 1981 , but are they enough? 

Since the streets are city property. If s difficult for the College to take im- 
mediate action. 

Some Ideas worth considering are: longer holding red lights, an 
underground tunnel, an Island In the middle of the street, alteration of the 
speed limit, or a walkway over Third Street. 

There are several sets of white lines painted on the street. Students 
should walk within the boundrles of those lines. It should be stated that it Is the 
law to walk In these areas, and violators are. In reality, jaywalking. 

However, until someone comes up with a solution, students, faculty, and 
others are urged to take all precautions necessary while walking In traffic or 
being In traffic. Anyone who drives or walks on Third or Susquehanna Streets 
runs a calculated risk of Injuring someone or being Injured. 

And to those 1 percent who enjoy hitting the throttle - 

Remember this: there's always the chance that someone weary-eyed, 
balancing books and carrying coffee Is in your path. Before doing something 
you'll regret, think of the anqulsh those people Involved would suffer. Many in- 
nocent victims would end up with marred lives forever. 

Maybe if motorlstts would consider the consequences of their actions, the 
streets would be safer for pedestrians. 



SPOTLIQHT 
Monday, OcL 7, 1915 ■ Vol. 21, No. 7 

The SPOTUGHT Is published each Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept for College vacations, by Journalism and other Interested students of The 
Wllllamsporl Area Community College 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W. Third St., Wllllamsport, Pa. 
17701. Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Extension 221. 



THE STAFF 

Wanna F. Brown. Managing Editor: Sandra L. Musgrave, Editorial Page Editor; 
LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr., Photography Editor: Kathy L. Cobb, Administrative Affairs 
Editor: Kelly S. Herrdd. Student Allairs fleporfer, Cynthia E. A. Hartrantt, Advertis- 
ing Director; Michael A. Dye. Sfaff>*rnsr, Lyie A, Wagner, Production Coordinator 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Galene M. Castlebury, Catherine A, Hannon, Susan C. Kallansrud, Joel J. 
Mader, Timothy F Neidig, Usa E. Secrlst, 
Faculty adviser: Anthony N. Clllo. 



SPOTUGHTaMindt;, Oct. T, inSDJ 



Kl 



i^»-\. 




'Committed to the 

principle of the 

community 

college... 

and the lifelong 

education 

approach' 



SPOTLIGHT//!^... 



Dr. James E. Middleton 



By Katky L. Cobb, of The SPOTLIGHT SUff 

Dr. James E. Middleton, dean of academic affairs, is a native of Aberdeen, 
S.D., and spent most of his youth in Montana. 

He received his bachelor's degree in European Literature and Thought from 
the University of Iowa. His first master's degree in English Literature was 
awarded by the University of Leeds in England. His second master's degree in 
English was awarded by the University of Iowa. 

His doctorate in EogUsh Language and Literature was awarded by the 
University of Michigan. His doctorate has a special focus on technical writing 
and community college administration. 
Cune lo Williimiport from Btltimore 

As an undergraduate. Dr. Middleton enjoyed fencing and was the captain 
of his college rugby team. He presently enjoys jogging and cross-country skiing. 

Before coming to the College, Dr. Middleton was associate professor/direc- 
tor of the Writing Laboratory at Dundalk Community College, Baltimore, Md. 

He previously had taught several years of high school in the Chicago 
suburbs - where he also coached football and track - and in Jamaica, the West 
Indies. 
Wu Integrated Stndies Division dirKtor 

Dr. Middleton has held the position of dean of academic affairs for one 
year. He had been director of the Integrated Studies Division for the preceding 
two and a half years. 

He comments, "I am truly committed to the principal of the community 
college: open access to education, emphasis on the practical needs of the in- 
dividual. 

"I am firmly committed to the lifelong education approach, and working 
with adult and traditional age students, in the process of providing practical oc- 
cupational skills and at the same time integrating very important Uberal arts 
skills." 

Dr. Middleton's wife, Susan, is a former Peace Corps volunteer. She cur- 
rently works for Divine Providence Hospital as a child life specialist and occa- 
sionally instructs a part-time psychology course at the College. 

The couple has one son, Wesley, 7. 



Upcoming activities 
discussed; SGA 
to elect on Tuesday 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA) met last Tuesday in Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center 
(LEQ. 

At the meeting, some activities 
discussed were another dance in the Sus- 
quehanna Room, an upcoming concert 
in the gymnasium. 

Among the complaints discussed 
was one about not enough cashiers in 
the Susquehanna Room; this problem 
will be addressed, the group decided. 
Another problem noted was the need for 
a bigger area to be made available for 
the dance in the Susquehanna Room. 

It was noted that the Bloodmobile 
will be on Main Campus on Oct. 22 and 
23. Volunteers will be needed to help 
during the Bloodmobile visit, which is a 
community service project for student 
groups. 

The SGA by-laws were handed out 
along with office cards for the senators. 
A list of new and returning senators was 
also handed out. 

The SGA will elect officers and set 
up committes at its meeting tomorrow 
at 5 p.m. in Room B107, LEC. 



Walk to help world's hungry is on Sunday 
participants from College are 'welcome* 



A CROP Walk - a walk to help 
the world's hungry - will begin at 1:30 
p.m. in Memorial Park, Williamsport, 
on Sunday, Oct. 20, according to accor- 
ding to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

Participants from the College com- 
munity are welcome, she said. Those 
wishing to take part may either walk or 
ride a bike. 

Anyone interested in taking part 
may pick up additional information and 
a sponsor sheet at the Recreation Center 
Office in the Lifelong Education Center, 
she said. 

Mrs. Fremiotti pointed out that 20 
percent of all the money raised by par- 
ticipants through their sponsonhips 
stays in the local area to help the needy. 

SponionUp ii per-mik 

One person alone, she said, cannot 
solve the problem of world hunger. 
However, those participating in this 
event can provide nourishment, com- 
fort, and hope to people through the 
world. 

For each mile walked - or for each 
mile over which a bicycle is ridden 
-participants ask sponsors to make a 
donation. 

Biking for Hunger participants 
have a choice of two starting points. 



One is at St. John's United Methodist 
Church, 2101 Newberry St., and the 
other is at the Montoursville Fire Hall 
nexLto the bike path (Route 87). 

The two goals for the bikers will be 
either 11 miles or 22 miles. 

Walking participants have their 
choice of 3, 6, or 10-mile courses. 

After completing the event, par- 



ticipants collect their money and return 
it to a predetermined point. For those 
from the College who take part, the 
turn-in spot is the Recreation Center of- 
fice. Money is to be placed in a sealed 
sponsor sheet envelope. 

Sponsor sheets now are available in 
the Recreation Center Office in the 
Lifelong Education Center. 



{ BARRY'S 



^ 




(^)ea 6 a.m. lo mittni^ 

Monday thru Friday 

Open Saturday I p.m. to 3 a.m. 



Barry says: We won't cook i bnrger before ill dme. 

Brooklyn Style Eatery 



•A UNIQUE Eating Experience 
•Best Breakfast in Town 
•arcade and pool table 
•Daily Specials 

234 Park St. Just across from 
the new east parking lot 




4aSP01lIGHTaMoidi;, Oct. T, INS 




OFFICERS FOR LE JEUNE CHEF ~ Officers for Ihe stDdent-operaled 
icidarinl irt Keonelb L. Morgin, of Begins, secretiry, sealed i( left; Jein 
M. Winter, of WUIiimsport, treuurer, seited at right; Kith; 1. ZIoclde, of 
Kolpmont, president, standing at left, and Karen L. Daniels, of WUIiimsport, 
»lce president. /SPOTLIGHT pholoj 



Sign up this week 
for volleyball 

Rosters now are being accepted for 
anyone interested in league volleyball. 
Teams may be male, coed, female, full 
or part-time students, staff or faculty. 

Individuals may sign up also. 

Rosters may be picked up in the 
Recreation Center, Room A137, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

The deadline for the voUyball 
rosters is next Tuesday, Oct. 15, accor- 
ding to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

She said those who sign up should 
note on the rosters when the team can- 
not - and she emphasized caimot - 
participate Monday through Thursday. 

WANTED 

Female vocalist and/or Keyboardist 
(Rock Music). Call Glenn at 
326-<>(38 after 4 p.m. ladvl./ 



PBL dance 
this Wednesday 

Conlmualfiom Page /■■■ 

leges and universities from the state of 

Pennsylvania. 

Those attending from the College 
were Ceylon S. (Lonnie) Reinard, presi- 
dent, of Port Trevorton; Richard L. 
Evans, opf Philipsburg; Daria L. 
Beahm, of Lock Haven, and Judy L. 
Brokaw, of Mansfield. 

Two of the many workshops the 
students attended, the adviser said, were 
on "stress" and on "dress for success". 

In addition to the workshops, the 
students had available a buffet luncheon 
and a fashion show featuring models 
from Penn Slate University as well as a 
banquet in the evening. A video dance 
concluded the activities for the night. 

The next meeting of the organiza- 
tion will be held tomorrow at 3:30 p.m. 
in Room 329 of the Academic Center. 




BENSON 




fiffi mini ^ 
JMMnmarket 



FHMSO meets and plans 
activities including trips 



The Food and Hospitality Manage- 
ment Student Organization (FHMSO) 
met last Tuesday at 2 p.m. in Room 
132, Lifelong Education Center. 

A New York trip is planned for 
Monday, Nov. 11. Registration is tS 
and it is due today. Transportation 
costs will be $20 and dinner will be SIO 
to $15; those payments are due Oct. 28. 

Departure time is 6 a.m. and the 
return time is 10 p.m. 

A trip to Chicago is planned for 
May 19. Costs will be determined later. 

The committee who planned these 
trips includes Brenda L. Rice of Linden, 
and Matthew L. Mitchell, of Wellsboro. 
Fand-nisers planned 

Several fimd-raisere were planned. 
Lori A. Miller, of Altoona, and Mrs. 
Suzann L. Bennett, coordinator of food 
service programs, are on a committee to 
publish a cookbook. 

Thermometers have been purchas- 
ed to use as a fimd-raiser and will sell 
for $9. 

Gloria E. Anderson, of Clarendon, 
and Billy C. Wible, of Shirleysburg, are 



investigating having a smorgasbord. 
Offlctn elected 

The officers elected were 
parliamentarian, Carol A. Kreger, of 
Liberty; first-year social director/news 
reporter, David R. Palski, and second- 
year social director/news reporter, 
Michelle R. Trout, of Jersey Shore. 

A community service project is 
planned for Thursday. The group will 
be making baked goods and deUvering 
them to St. Anthony's Center in 
Williamsport and to the Love Center in 
Jersey Shore. 

FHMSO has completed its Big 
Brother-Big Sister program. A Big 
Brother-Big Sister tea was held on 
Wednesday, Sept. 25 in the Le Jeune 
Chef Restaurant. Chairpersons were 
Jean M. Warner and Brenda L. Rice. 

The recent meeting was conducted 
by the vice president, Karen L. Daniels, 
of Williamsport. 

The next meeting will be held next 
Wednesday, Oct. 16, at 2 p.m. in the 
Introduction to Food Lab in the 
Lifelong Education Center. 



Elks National Scholarship applications 
now available in Financial Aid Office 

Applications for the recently-announced Elks National Scholarship are 
available in the College's Financial Aid Office, Room 201, Academic Center. 

The deadline for applying is Monday, Nov. 25. 

The scholarship of $1,000 per year will be awarded for the 1986-87 
academic year. 

This program, aaording to Donald S. Shade, financial aid director, is open 
to any students who plan to pursue a vocational/technical curriculum. It is open 
to both male and female students. 

The scholarship may be used only at a two-year or less school. 

The scholarship is awarded for a two-year period, and the student does not 
have to reapply. 



Participate at your own risic 

The College Activities Officer personnel would like to remind 
students that they participate In activities at their own risk. 



Do High Prices Make You Sad? ^ 

Put on a happy face and 
shop at a great thrift store - 

C_y You'll love ml ^' ' 

The Excliange Mart 
314 W. 4th Street 








Hours: Tues. thru Ttiurs. 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Friday 9:30 a.m. to 7:17 p.m. 
Saturday 9:30 a.m. to noon 



S2.N off uy K-igch, 3-itHi or nore pliii 
One Coupon Per Plan 

Expires Oct. 13, 1985 

FMt, Free DcUvcr; fCuslomer pays sales Ux and bonlt deposil) 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 

~~~~~~~~~~''~ i'^nnnn n i[~innQOQL 



I UMITED DELIVERY AREA 

I 1303 Washington Blvd. 
! Phone: 322-2022 



Open for Lunch 

11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Sonda; - Tbinda; 
11:00 a.in. - 2 a.m. Friday t Satorda; 




FUND-RAISING - Memben of Gtfflmi Epsilon Tid recently held i bike sale 
in the Academic Center lobby to raise money for virioas fraternity projects in- 
clndtaig field trips. Behind the table are Scott D. Dickerson, graphic arts stn- 
dent from Philipsbnrg, N.J. and president of the organization, and Cindy L. 
Knzma, graphic arts student from Hazelton, a GET member. [SPOTLIGHT 
photoj 

Whiten Up Sale, Teen Time set 
popcorn giveaway for Saturday 
'were very popular' 



The Whiten Up Sale and the pop- 
corn giveaway held by the Student 
American Dental Hygienists Associa- 
tion (SADHA) in mid-September were 
very popular with the students at large, 
according to Mrs. Davie Jane Nestarick, 
director of the Health Sciences Division 
and dental hygiene coordinator. 

For the Whiten Up Sale, students 
could get a discount off the price of hav- 
ing their teeth cleaned. 

The popcorn giveway had "strings 
attached". The "strings attached" were 
blank appointment cards for teeth 
cleaning ~ and those who accepted the 
popcorn were invited to take advantage 
of the Whiten Up Sale. 

Mrs. Nestarick said many students 
did take advantage of the sale and made 
appointments. 



A new program sponsored by the 
College Activities OfBce, the Center for 
Lifelong Education, and the 
Williamsport Recreation Commission 
will be started this Saturday in the gym. 
The program is called "Teen Time". 

The program will offer open gym 
for teens of the area. Students who are 
still teen-aged may enter the program. 
Only teen-agers may register. 

The program extends from this 
Saturday through Saturday, Dec. 21, 
excluding Saturday, Nov. 30. 

The program involves instruction 
and tournaments in volleyball, basket- 
ball, table tennis, badmitton, and 
special activities. 

There is no fee for the program. 
Registration is at the door this Thursday 
and Saturday. 

Additional information is available 
by telephoning the College Activities Of- 
fice at 326-3761, Ext. 269. 




Trustees okay 
revised budget, 
other matters 

Conlinued/rom Page /■■■ 

Dr. Breuder stated that while the 
decrease in the operating budget does 
not totally cover the total loss of 
revenue caused by the enioUment 
decUne, the College expects additional 
revenue to come in through variable sti- 
pend money to make up the difference, 
and to help offset costs to non- 
sponsored students. 

He added that the adjustment to 
the budget resulted m some decreases in 
salaries and employee benefits. 

The Board approved salary in- 
crements for adininistrative, profes- 
sional, technical (APT), classified and 
service staff for 1985-86. Dr. Breuder 
had recommended a 4 1/2 percent ad- 
justment based on cunent salaries. The 
Board also approved an additional 
allocation up to a maximum of 3 1/4 
percent for each of the respective 
employee classifications. Those monies 
would be used to fimd position 
reclassifications, implement salary 
systems, address salary mequities and to 
effect other related adjustments as deter- 
mined appropriate by Dr. Breuder. 

According to a communique 
distributed from the president's office, 
the primary objective in utilizing this 
allocation is to maintain and/or im- 
prove salary competitiveness necessary 
for attraction and retention of quaUty 
College staff. Employees in good stan- 
ding and who are otherwise eligible 
under their respective salary systems will 
receive such mcrements. 

The Board approved bids for 
transformer system trainers and 
motor/generator systems trainers in the 
amount of $148,865. The contract will 
be awarded to Hampden Engineering 
Corporation of East Longmeadow, 
Mass. The College plans to purchase 
this equipment in order to expand and 
upgrade the electrical analysis lab in the 
Technical Trades Center. 

The equipment will be used to 
teach theory operation and control of 
transformers, motors, and generators in 
the electrical occupation and electrical 
technology programs. 

The Board also approved several 
other items, including the transfer of 
S79,000 from the Williamsport National 
Bank Deemer Trust to the College 
Foundation for investment; the closing 
of the College on Jan. 2 and Jan. 3, 
1986 to extend the previously-scheduled 
College hoUday, and other items involv- 
ing personnel such as transfers, employ- 
ment and continued employment. 



SPOTUGHTaMoidij, Oct. 7, IM5d5 

Basketball rosters 
available for all 

Rosters for the basketball tourna- 
ment are being accepted. Rosters may 
be picket up m the Reaeation Center, 
Room A137, Lifelong Education center, 
according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti. 

Teams may be male, female, coed, 
full/part time students, staff or faculty. 
Individuals are welcome to sign up. 
Rules and regulations may be picked up 
at the same time the roster is. 

Sign up deadUne is next Tuesday. 
Please note on the roster when your 
team CANNOT participate. 



Littering costs 
us money: Use trash 
receptacles I 




r H [ D I t > [ • E • C E 



Creating together 
what no one can do alone 




You haven't had a Hoagie 

until you've had a 

HOBY 

HOBY'S HOAGIES 
and PIZZA 

50S FIHh Avenue 

2 block! north of WACC. 

•crOM from Horn* Svc. Bovongo 

322-5455 

Free Delivery 

llmllod Aroa • Minimum Ord<r S4.00 

20% off lUl Mndwkhei 
with validated itodent ID 

Ejqrim Oct. 13, 1985 

OPEN 11 A.M. tol A.M. 
7 DAYS A WEEK 



6DSP0HlGHTaM(«di;, Od. 7, IMS 




(VWAS Profile... Deam E. WUsfon 

AssbUnI general maoiger of UniTenal Ridio is Dennij E. Wilston. Den- 
nis is from Ctnlon, Pi. He cm ht heard on tlie College's stadent-operated 
radio sUtion, WW AS 88FM, on Mondays from 2 to 3 p.m. and Wednesdays 
from 12 a.m. to 1 p.m. playing Top 40 music. 

Dennis's interests inclnde older rock and roil music and stand-up come- 
dians. He also Is a memlMr of the sports staff at WWAS. ISPOTLIGHT 
photo] 



■-r^\ 



i^Jr 



Lookin' Up! 

Very talUilll crane was in position to move materials for new Advanced 
Technology and Allied Health Sciences Center under construction it foot of 
Susquehanna Street. Rising from the gronnd and becoming more and more 
altendon-gettlng is foundation of what will be largest building on campns. At 
lut Board of Trasleet meeting, it was reported that construction is ahead of 
schedule and that a completion date earlier than planned is the goal. 
ISPOTLIGHT pholoj 



Definition of Vandalism: 



Doliaricide. 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 

PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from fV.A.C.C. 

Hosn: Mon.-Stl. 11 i.m. lo 9 p.m. Cloml Sanda; 

Monday Regular Sub 

Tuesday Meatball 

Wednesday Turkey 
Thursday Ham 

Friday Tuna 

Saturday Cheese Steak 

•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" w whole $2.10 half 




DAILY SPECIALS 



Whole $1.60 
Whole $1.75 
Whole $1.40 
Whole $1.80 
Whole $1.70 
Whole $2.50 



Open Gym, 
other activities 
are scheduled 

Open gym will be held today 
through this Wednesday from 4 to 10 
p.m. The weight room will also be open 
at these times. There wiU be no Sunday 
open gym this week. 

Tomorrow, the weight room will be 
closed from 7 to 8 p.m. 

Table tennis will be held in the gym 
today and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. 

College Activities Office personnel 
are reminding all those who use the gym 
and weight room that a valid ID and 
clean gym shoes are required. Those 
who do not have them iM be asked to 
leave. 

The gym will not be open on 
Thursday or Sunday. 



Reading Outlets 
trip scheduled 

A bus trip to the Reading Outlets, 
is scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 16. The 
bus will leave the Lifelong Education 
Center at 6:30 a.m., aaording to Mrs. 
JoAnne R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities. 

The bus will depart from Reading 
at 7 p.m. 

There is a $10 fee for all College 
stodents and faculty members. A $12 
fee will be charged to the general public. 
The deadline to make reservations is 
Wednesday, Nov. 6. Reservations may 
be made by calling 327-4763. 



Don't waste waterl 

If you're not going to drink 

It, don't pour Itl 



■VALUABLE COUPON! 



p B ^ ■ v/iLU/iUU: LUUf UN! ■ ■■ ■ ■ 

SmEE PIIIAI s 



I Buy any size Little Caesars 
I Original round pizza at regular 
I price, get the identical pizza 
I FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8i00 




W.A.C.C. itideiu nve 
•ddMoul \Vk otif wltk 
■tidnl I.D. ud tUi id. 



One coupon pel customer. Cany out only. At paitlcipaling locations. 



If you see a guy writing on a waii... 
give someone in authority a caii. 
If you leave a vandal "worl( at will" 
You'll Just have to pay the bill. 



Sasqoehanna Room Menu for tlie Weeii 



The Susquehanna Room's menu 
for the week starting today, Monday, 
Oct. 7, is presented as furnished by the 
Susquehanna Room management. 
Dall; Breikfut 

Scrambled eggs, 59'; hash browns, SS'; 
home fries, SS'; pancakes, {1.29; French toast, 
99'; waffles, 99*; sausage, 79'; Muffin Supreme, 
$1.09; Croissant Surprise, tl.39; Colorado piU 
pocket, SI. 59. 

Dill; Siiul Bar 

Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomoatoes, 
onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, 
bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple 
butter, Jello, potato salad, com relish. 

Todi;, Moaday, Oct. 7 
Lanch 

Sweet and sour meatballs, potato, 
vegetable, S2.S9; Yankee pot roast, gravy, 
potatoes, vegetable, S2.S9. 
Soap 

French onion and Manhattan clam 
chowder. 

Dinner 

Fried pork chop, gravy, potatoes, 
vegetable, {2.89; Colorado cube steak, gravy, 
potatoes, and vegetable, {2.69. 
Sudwicka 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70*; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; steak and cheese, $1.79; tuna 
salad sandwich, $1.59; meatloaf 
sandwich,$1.29; French fries, 55". 



Toeadiy, Oct. 8 
Lunch 

Sausage and peppen, homefries, $2.39; 
chicken nuggets, potatoes, vegetable, $2.39. 
Sogp 
' Chicken noodle, cream of potato. 
DIuer 
Manicotti and small salad bar, Italian 
bread, $2.89; Maryland crab cakes, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.59. 



Saidwkhei 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70*; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; turkey sandwich, $1.59; ham 
salad sandwich, $1.39; taco, 99'; French fries, 
55'. 



Wedieiday, Oct. 9 
Luck 

Kielbassi and pierogi, vegetable, $2.19; 
tamale pie, vegetable, $1.99. 
Soop 
ChiU, vegetable beef. 
Dinner 
Filled Vt chicken, gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59; ground round steak, gravy, 
potatoes, vegetable, $2.59. 
Sudwicka 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70*; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; chicken hoagie, $1.59; sausage 
hoagie, $1.59; chili dog, 89'; French fiies, 55'. 



Tkandiy, Oct. 10 
Luck 

Ham and broccoli Benedict over English 
muffin, $2.39; stuffed pepper, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.39. 

Soap 
Com chowder, beef noodle. 

Diuer 
Westem beef roast, gravy, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.89; open faced Reuben, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.89. 

Sudwickci 

Qiana pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 

$1.35; pizza, 55°; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 

hoagie, $1.49; meatball hoagie, $1.59; chicken 

salad, $1.59; egg salad, $1.59; French fries, SS'. 



Friday, Oct. II 
No daisci 



SPOTUGHTDMoidiy, Oct. 7, 19850 / 

Le Jeone Chef Menus This Weelc 

Le Jeune Chef, the student-operated restaurant, serves luncheons Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Thursday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The restaurant is closed to- 
day and Friday. 

ToBomnv, Tictday, Oct. 8 

Soup du jour: Cbeddar-cider soup, 7S' cup, 80' bowl. 

Light Luncheon: Russian salad with cooked Russian dressing, roll and beverage, $2.65. 

Special for the day: Sweet and sour pork kabobs, rice pilaf, green beam or small tossed 
salad, roll and beverage, $3.75. 

Desserts: Hot fudge sundae, 75'; chocolate mousse, 75', and apple pie, 75". 
WedMMby, Oct. 9 

Soup du jour: Cream of cauUflower, 73' cup, 80* bowl. 

Light Luncheon: Sea shore salad, roll and beverage, $2.7S. 

Special for the day: Barbeque short ribs, parsley-butter noodles, French green beans or 
Mexican com, soft roll and beverage, $3.75. 

Desserts: Canot cake, 80"; apple crisp, 70", and orange strawberry sponge cake, 70*. 
Tkwiday, Oct. II 

Soup du jour: Broccoli-ham soup, 75' cup, 80' bowl. 

Light luncheon: Curried beef and spinach platter, roll and beverage, $3.75. 

Special for the day: Mushroom-stuffed fish rolls, buttered rice, saute«t beets or buttered 
carrot daisies, crescent roll and beverage, $3.75. 

Desserts: Cherry cheese cake, 80*; banana spUt torte, 80', and peach pecan ice cream cake. 



Peer Information & Referral Center 

Complete Confidentiality 



Room 105 
Gymnasium 



If you hava a problam, 

coma and talk to ua 

whathar tha problam 

la major or amall. 



HOURS 

Monday - Thursday: 10:00 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Friay: 10:00 am. to 4 p.m. 

Closed Weekends 

Students Helping Fellow Students 



If You Want to Use Drugs... 

That's Your Business 

If You Want to Stop 

That's Ours! 

There Is Help... 

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS 

Wednesday Meetings 

7 P.M. to 8 P.M. 

Room B107 

Learning Resources Center 

(LEC) 



PHI BETA LAMBDA 

will host a Fund Raising Sale 

Mondaj/y Oct, 7 

through Friday y Oct, 18 




A Wide Variety of Unique Gifts from the Cariosity 
Slioppe will be featured. 

Gifts will be on display in the lobby of the Academic 
Center the week of Oct. 7. 

Ordera will be taken throughout the week of Oct. 14 in... 

Plii Beta Lambda Office, Room 3, Lower Level 
of the Academic Center 



A., I'ill 



UTUflE BUSINESS LEADERS OF AMERICA 



PBL 



dtV.'.li'.' . '.W ttMtM 



8nSPOTUGHTDMo«dtj, Oct. 7, JM5 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Oct. 7 through Sunday, Oct. 13 
MEETINGS 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... noon, tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 8, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous... 7 to 8 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 9, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 9, Room 329, 
Academic Center. 

Student Government Association Executive Committee... 4 to 5 p.m., tomor- 
row, Tuesday, Oct. 8, Room BI07, Lifelong Education Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... Big-Brother, Big-Sister, 7 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 
9, Room 227, Academic Center. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Bloodmobile... 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 17, Natural Resources 
Management Division; 9:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 22, in the gym. Main 
Campus. 

CROP Walk for Hunger... Sunday, Oct. 20, beginning at 1:30 p.m. in 
Memorial Park, Williamsport. There will be 3, 6, 10, and 22-mile courses. 

Hunter Screening... 1 1 a.m. to 5 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 9, Divine Pro- 
vidence Hospital. 

AcnvmES 

Dance... from 9 to midnight, this Wednesday, Oct. 9, Susquehanna Room, 
sponsored by Phi Beta Lambda; cost is $1 for individuals and $1.50 for couples. 
TRANSFER INFORMATION 

Transfer information sessions... 1 p.m. or 3 p.m., today, Monday, Oct. 7, 
Academic Center Auditorium; also, 10 a.m., noon, and 2 p.m., this Wednesday, 
Oct. 9, Academic Center Auditorium. 

TRANSFER DAY 

Next Monday, Oct. 14: Representatives from various colleges will be on the 
first and second floors of the Academic Center from 1 to 3:30 p.m. to give informa- 
tion about transfer to their particular college. 

Dance group to perform next Saturday; 
admission free to students of College 



The Pennsylvania Dance Theatre 
will be performing in the Academic 
Center Auditorium at 7 p.m., next 
Saturday, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 



Cillo's 

College 
Corner 

1100 W. Third Si. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Phone 322-1321 

HOURS • Mon. Ibni Thurs. 

7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Open for Breakfast 

* * * 
Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 

Four winners 
every week 

• • • 

Your favorite Subs and 

Burgers the way you like 'em 

Come on over and gel 
somelhin ' good to eal! 



The performance will be free to 
students of the CoUege with vaUdated 
ID cards. 

Tickets are available in the Recrea- 
tion Center. 

Patron tickets are $5 and they in- 
clude reserved seats and a "meet the ar- 
tists" reception after the performance. 

The Pennsylvania Dance Theatre is 
a young and vital ensemble, Mrs. 
Fremiotti said. They are professional 
dancers from State College "eager to 
share their vision and achievement with 
a growing audience for contemporary 
choreography," she added. 

The group was established in 1979 
by artistic director LaRue Allen and has 
developed a repertory ranging from 
such classics as Doris Humphrey's 1928 
"Water Study" to recent works such as 
Hannah Kahn's "Aviary Pulse". 



Employment Opportunities 

/The information here is provided by Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of 
Advisement, Career Services. Questions about this ii\formation should be 
directed to the Advisement Center, Room 157, Learning Resources Center.] 

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES 

Campus Travel International, P.O. Box 6204, Station A, Daytona Beach, 
Fla. 32022 - wants students to represent spring break trips to Daytona Beach on 
campus. Earn free trips and commissions. Reply to the above address or can 
(904) 441-2481. 

SEAMSTRESS/TAILOR 
Coder's Qeaners, 537 Market St., WiUiamsport - has an opening for a 
seamstress/tailor, approximately 20 hours a week for major and minor altera- 
tions. Call Joanna Coder at 323-3704. 

CLOTHING SALES 
Queensway Fashions has an opening for clothing sales. No deliveries. Call 
Aggie Hufnagel at 524-0862 or Sandy Wilson at 742-8442. Leave message. 
BABYSITTER 
Occasional babysitter needed evenings after 5 o'clock. Must have driver's 
Ucense. Call Lynn Lang at 326-7874 days or 323-5446 in the evening. 
CARPENTRY 
Mark Steele (Carpentry), 1157 Memorial Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 17701 
-needs carpentry students to work with him. If interested, call 326-3993 as soon 
as possible. Leave message if he isn't there. This can be used for a co-op. 
ELECTRONICS STUDENT 
Nancy Pants, 2001 Memorial Ave., Wilhamsport, Pa. 17701 -needs an 
electronics student to repair a two-key Juki motor with an electric needle posi- 
tioner sewing machine. Call Bob Jacobs at 323-3527. 
COOK 
Mamma's OraDelPaso, North Deer Drive, Lewisburg, Pa. - is in need of a 
cook. 4 p.m. to 11 weekends and 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. during the week. Stop by 
and talk with Anna ZaraUi. During the day use the patio door in the rear of the 
building. 

Transfer Day is next Monday; 
information sessions this week 



No classes Friday 

There will be no claues this 
Friday, the scheduled Fall vaca- 
tion day. 

Poslsecondtry tacally and 
sladents as well as secondary 
students will have the day off. 
However, secondary faculty are 
to use the day as a staff develop- 
ment day. 

CoUege administrative per- 
sonnel and support services per- 
sonnel (snch as the Bursar's Of- 
fice and Student Records) will 
maintain regalar work schedules. 



Thomas C. Shoff, counselor in the 
College's Advisement and Career Ser- 
vices Center, has announced that in an 
effort to provide students with more in- 
formation about college transfers, the 
College has scheduled transfer seminars 
today and this Wednesday. The 
seminars will be held in the Academic 
Center Auditorium. 

Those students who have con- 
sidered transferring to another college 
may attend either of today's two ses- 
sions - at I p.m. or at 3 p.m. - or any 
of the three sessions on Wednesday. On 
Wednesday, the sessions will be at 10 
a.m., at noon, and at 2 p.m. 

Students will have an opportunity 
to gain information about how to 
transfer to another coUege for continu- 
ing education. 

Shoff has also announced that 
College Transfer Day is scheduled for 
next Monday, Oct. 14. 

He said that the College has invited 
31 colleges to attend and to provide in- 
formation to interested students. 

To date, only 13 colleges have con- 
firmed that they will attend. According 
to Shoff, 24 colleges were represented 
last year. He said he hopes that as many 
will attend this year. 

He listed the following institutions 
as being among those who have con- 
firmed their representation here: 

Bloomsburg University, Indiana 
University, Pennsylvania State Universi- 
ty (main campus and Capital Campus), 
Geisinger Nursing School, SUppery 
Rock University, LaRoche College, and 
the Army Reserve. 



Shoff said he wanted to stress that 
students should make an effort to visit 
with the representatives even if they are 
not certain they will transfer to another 
college. He said, "They should take ad- 
vantage of this convenient opportunity 
to talk to someone and to get their ques- 
tions answered." 

He also said that students enroUed 
in technical programs are often eligible 
for transfer. "A common misconcep- 
tion is that only students enroUed in 
general studies programs are eligible to 
transfer. That is simply not true." 

Aaording to Shoff, an evening 
program will be operated through the 
Lycoming County Counselors Associa- 
tion. The program is to be entitled 
"CoDege Transfer Night" and is slated 
to be held at Lycoming College. 

This year, the college represen- 
tatives will be located on the first and 
second floors of the Academic Center 
from I to 3:30 p.m. 



Walking fs good 
for your health 
...use the steps and 
leave the elevator for 
those who need It! 



Ift'ACc ARC 



■iv^s 




Od. 14, INS • VaLlI, N«. I • ttifa 
Aim Ommaitt (Mkr • WHuuywt, Pl ITTIl 



^...f^ ^-^^gq ga^ : >j-, 




WEEK BY WEEK, PROGRESS IS EVIDENT AT CONSTRUCTION SITE 
OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY AND ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES 
CENTER AT THE FOOT OF SUSQUEHANNA STREET. LAST WEEK, 
GIRDERS BEGAN TO PRESENT A SKELETONAL PICTURE OF WHAT 

THE BUILDING WILL LOOK LIKE. ISPOTLIGHT photo by URoy S. mumire Jr.l 



2nSPOTUGHTOMo«b;, Od. 14, IMS 

Phys ed requirements 
should not be 'averaged in' 

Commantary by th« SPOTLIGHT 

Should physical education requlremants count toward academic stan- 
ding? 

One might question the reasoning behind forcing adult students to satisfy 
the same requirements that high school students must satisfy - and then 
penalizing them by averaging In a poor grade In phys ed with grades from 
academic courses. 
Altarnatlvas mada avallabia, but... 

An alternative made available at the College Is a combination of two 
health-oriented courses which may replace phys ed requirements: Personal 
and Community Health and First Aid, However, one might find that completing 
these courses Interferes with his or her usual academic load because in most 
cases they do not pertain to his or her selected program of study. 

What, then, should be done to satisfy requirements? By definition, phys 
ed Is not academically-oriented. The theory behind the requirements Is that an 
academic career would essentially be of no use If the body, which Is the bag- 
gage which carries a person through life, were to break down. We do not 
disagree with this theory. However, we believe that if a person is required to 
complete a certain amount of credits in phys ed or health, he or she should not 
be penalized by a poor grade. 
Doaan't giva trua raading 

When a student attempts to enter the business world, the prospective 
employer is more than likely going to look at his or her grade point average 
rather than Individual course grades. 

He will not gel a true reading of the student's academic performance if 
that student had not done well In phys ed or health and his difficulties were 
reflected In the grade point average. 

In essence, only those courses which pertain to a student's chosen field 
and those background courses which are prerequisites should apply to the 
academic standing. Perhaps the College could be a pace-setter and devise a 
new system by which phys ed/health credits would be optional or would be re- 
quired for graduation but not counted toward academic standing. 



Radio stations change format 

Commantary about radio 
By Llaa E. Sacrlat, of tha SPOTLIGHT Staff 

In turning on the radio, you may have heard the change of a few of the 
radio stations In the area. One of these stations Is J-1 04. now known as Joy 
1 04. Some of the other area stations are making the format change to mellow 
and easy listening music. 

One station In the area changed Its format so that It could better serve the 
listeners of the valley and because of the Involved operating cost to a station. 

Easy listening music Is more accepted In this valley because of the older 
generations who turn to radio for entertainment and enjoyment. 

If this type of music is not to your liking, remember that there are a variety 
of other stations to serve you. 




Pick up your spirits witli music 

Commentary on music by Lyia A. Wagnar, of tha SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The Dire Straits album. "Brothers In Arms", is a well rounded piece of 
work. The songs slip from one to another with an easy flow - which is not ac- 
complished by many artists. 

The best noted song is "Money for Nothing". The video for the song was 
also well received. 

The group has put together a variety of music both soft to the ear, on the 
mellow side, and others that fall into today's rock style with outstanding quali- 
ty. 

Too often one only encounters rock with lyrics that are loud and unmean- 
Ingful. Dire Straits' "Brothers In Arms" can pick up your spirits, or let you sit 
back and relax. 

This album is wall worth the price that music costs at the present time. 



Letters... 
to SPOTLIGHT readers 



Students show professionalism 
and get tlianl<s for job well done 

To SPOTLIGHT raiders: 

Professionalism is an Important attribute In a successful career person. 
This being the case, we anticipate nothing less than success for tour students 
- Kathy Cobb, Wanna Brown, Donna Trimble, and Lee Whitmire - who show- 
ed complete professionalism In their coverage of Fire College Weekend on 
Oct. 5 and 6, 1985 

As interim director of communications at the College, I saw in Fire Col- 
lege Weekend an excellent opportunity for the College to work hand-in-hand 
with students to provide publicity for the College-sponsored event. 

What it took was a good deal of organization, cooperation and dedication 
on the part of the students. What It resulted in was excellent publicity tor the 
College and - even more Important - an unmatched source of hands-on ex- 
perience in news reporting for the students. 

I'd like to take this opportunity to publicly thank these four students for 
giving us one solid weekend of very effective news coverage. The coverage 
was. In fact, so professional that It was used by the Wllllamsport Sun-Gazette 
and will be submitted for publication In four national firefighters' publications. 

I expect that in some future Issue of the SPOTLIGHT, you'll be seeing the 
results of their weekend efforts. I'm sure you'll agree with me that they've done 
a very professional Job as student |ournallsts. 

To Kathy, Wanna, Donna, and Lee: again, we express our thanks. 

- Elaine J. Lambert 
Interim Director of Communications 



Petition recognized, 

input needed 
SGA senators say 

To SPOTLIGHT readers: 

Recently, the Student Govern- 
ment Association (SGA) received a 
petition signed by more than 25 
students in reference to the volume of 
the television in the student lounge, 
first floor of the Academic Center. 

These students felt the volume of 
the television was too high and that it 
interfered with their attempts to study. 

We at SGA have formed a com- 
mittee to investigate and solve this pro- 
blem. 

We request that some of the 
students who signed this petition visit 
the SGA office. Room A138. Lifelong 
Education Center, or call us at College 
Ext. 248, and get involved by joining 
this committee or by giving some 
positive ideas about solving this dilem- 
ma. 

The SGA is your voice. Please 
come and talk to us. We need your In- 
put to make decisions beneficial to the 
entire student body. 
-Ralph T. Klugh, senator, Executive 
Committee, SGA, and Student 
Awareneas/Commlttea Officer; 
diesel mechanics student from 
Wllllamaport 

-Kent M. Weaver, senator, SGA, 
machine tool technology student 
from New Holland 



Littering costs 
us money: Use trash 
receptacles! 



SPOTLIQHT 
Monday, Oct 14, I98S - Vol. 21, No. S 

The SPOTUGHT Is published each Monday 
morning of the academic year, except for Col- 
lege vacations, by Journalism and other In- 
terested students of The Wllllamsport Area Com- 
munity College 

Office: Room 7. Academic Center, 1005 
W, Third St,, Wllllamsport, Pa, 17701, 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 221, 



Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or of those whose names accom- 
pany Items, Opinions do not reflect official opi- 
nion of the Institution, 



Wanna F, Brown. Managing Editor 

Sandra L, Musgrave. Editorial Page Editor 

LeRoy S, Whitmire Jr,, Photograptiy Editor 

Kathy L, Cobb. Administrative Affairs Editor 

Kelly S, Herrold, Student Affairs Reporter 

Cynthia E, A, Hartranft Advertising Director 

Michael A. Dye, Staff Artist 

Lyie A, Wagner, Production Coordinator 

Timothy F Neldig, Photomechanical Technician 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Gaiene M, Castiebury, Catherine A, Han- 
non, Di-Anne 1, Hess, Susan R, Kaiiansrud, Joel 
J Mader, Lisa E Secrlst, 

Faculty adviser: Anthony N Clllo. 



Sasqoehanna Room Menu for the Week 

The Susquebaima Room's menu for the week starting today, Monday, Oct. 
14, is presented as fiirnisbed by the Susquehanna Room management. 



DiO; BreiUm 

Scrambled eggs, 59*; hash browns, SS'; 
home fries, SS'; pancakes, $1.29; French toast, 
99'; waffles, 99"; sausage, 79'; Muffin Supreme, 
$1.09; Croissant Surprise, $1.39; Colorado piu 
pocket, $1.S9. 

Dill; Silad Bar 

Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomatoes, 
onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, 
bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple 
butter, Jello, potato salad, com reUsh. 



Mondir, Oct. 14 
Lonch 

Spaghetti and sausage, Italian bread, 
$2.19; beef pot pie, vegetable, $2.S9. 
Sonp 
Ham and bean, cream of broccoli. 

Dinner 
Baked fish, shrimp sauce, potato and 
vegetable, $2.79; roast pork, gravy, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2.59. 

Sandwkha 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; beef salad in pita, $1.79; tuna 
salad, $1.59; taco, 99'; French fries, 55'. 



Tueidi;, Oct. IS 
Lonch 

Franks and sauerkraut, $1.99; Swedish 
meatballs, potatoes and vegetable, $2.19. 
Soap 
Beef barley, tomato rice. 

Dinner 
Chicken and ribs, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.89; Jambalaya, potato, vegetable, $2.59. 
Sandwlcbet 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1 .49; roast pork sandwich, $1 .59; ham 
and cheese, $1.59; turkey, $1.59; French fries, 
55'. 



Weduida;, Oct. 1< 
Uack 

Shrimp quiche, small salad bar, $2.99; 
roast turkey breast, gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.39. 

Soip 
Cream of mushroom, minestrone. 

Dinner 
Linguine with red clam sauce. $2.89; 
Swiss steak, potatoes, vegetable, $2.89. 
Siidwkha 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; steak & cheese, $1.79; grilled 
cheese, 79'; shrimp salad, $1.79; French fries, 
55'. 

Thgndiy, Oct. 17 
Lnnch 

French dip, potatoes, vegetable, $2.59; 
chopped sirloin, gravy, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.39. 

Soop 
French onion. New England clam chowder. 

Dinner 
Chicken and biscuits, vegetable, $2.79; 
shrimp scampi over rice, vegetable, $2.89. 
Sindwlcbei 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70*; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; croissant melt, $1.79; tuna salad, 
$1.59; roast beef, 99'; French fries, S5'. 



Friday, Oct. 18 
Lnnch 

Beef and peppers, potatoes, vegetable, 
$2.59; baked Ziti, Italian bread, $2.19. 
Sonp 

Chicken noodle, cream of potato. 
Sudwkhea 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; chicken salad in pita, $1.79; fried 
bologna/cheese, $1.29; bacon club, $1.79; 
French fries, 55'. 



Contributions for W.A.C.C. Horizons 

now being accepted In SPOTLIGHT office, 

Room 7, lower level, Academic Center 



If You Want to Use Drugs... 

That's Your Business 

If You Want to Stop 

That's Ours! 

There is Help... 

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS 

Wednesday Meetings 

7 P.M. to 8 P.M. 

Room B107 

Learning Resources Center 

(LEC) 



SPOTUGHTDMowbr, Oct. 14, lM5a3 

Le Jeane Chef Menos This Weeli 

Le Jeune Chef, the student-operated restaurant, serves luncheons Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thunday, and Friday, from II a.m. to I p.m. The restaurant is 
closed today. 

ToBonow, Tictdiy, Oct. IS 

Soup du jour: Cheddar cheese soup, 75' cup, 80" bowl. 

Light Luncheon: Swiss turkey melt on rye rolls, petite salad, beverage, $2.75. 

Special for the day: Chicken cordon blue, sweet potato coins, Hawaiian style green beans or 
buttered peas, roll, beverage, $3.75. 

Desserts: Assorted pies, 75'; gingerbread with lemon sauce, 75', and shoolly pie, 80'. 
WedicMlay, Oct. li 

Soup du jour: Cream of asparagus, 75' cup, 80' bowl. 

Light Luncheon: Roast beef croissant, cup of soup, beverage, $2.85. 

Special for the day: Lasagna roll florentine, Italian stir-fry vegetables, garlic bread and 
beverage, $3.65. 

Desserts: Banana rum pie 80'; grasshopper pie, 80', and assorted pies, 75'. 
Tkinday, Oct. 17 

Soup du jour: Chicken rice, 75' cup, 80* bowl. 

Light luncheon: Alsation cheese salad, roll and beverage, $2.75. 

Special for the day: Chinese peppersteak, Chinese vegetables, ginger peas, roll and 
beverage, $3.75. 

Desserts: Berries 'n' cream torte, 85'; chocolate tonone, 75', and lemon roll minosa, 80'. 
Friday, Oct. 18 

Soup du jour: Wonton soup, 85' cup, 95'bowl. 

Light luncheon: Quiche, petite salad, beverage, $2.75. 

Special for the day: Turkey marsalla, carrot boats, snow peas or broccoh, roll and 
beverage, $3.75. 

Desserts; Peach banana dream pie-cake, 70*; strawberry ribbon pie, 80'; assorted pies, 75"; 
chocolate eclair, 80'. 



Participate at your own risl( 



The College Activities Officer personnel would like to remind 
students that they participate in activities at their own risk. 



PHI BETA LAMBDA 

The Curiosity Shoppe 

An Excellent Choice of Unique Gifts for 
Christmas Giving 

Display in Lobby of the Academic Center until 

Friday, October 18 

Orders will be taken in the PBL office 

Room 3, Lower Level of the Academic Center 

or see any member of the PBL club 

A WIDE VARIETY OF UNIQUE GIFTS FROM 
THE CURIOSITY SHOPPE 



la^^^ 




PBL 



4DSI>OTUGHTaMoiihj, Oct. 14, IMS 



1 



WUliiiniport, geli Oatium reidj for EKG 



College's 

practical nursing 

students give 

assistance 

for local hospital's 

hunter screening 

program 



SPOTLIGHT photos 

By URoy S. Whllmlre Jr. 

Pholognptar Editor 




»^^|^ "^ Mirk W. Moser, pncticil Donini itDdent from 

Rath S. Mo«r pnctkil ii«rriiij itndent from McEwensvUle, working during EKG phue of 



Kreening process. 




TAKING A MOMENT - Practical nursing stndenis taking part in the 
banter screening list Wednesday were (from left) Lori L. Minnich, of 
Mlfflinburg; Ruth S. Moser, of Williamsport; Mark W. Moser, of 
McEwensviUe, and Judy A. Bubnis, of Lewisburg. 



Jndy A. Bnbnis, practical nursing student 
from Lewiiburg, checks blood pressure. 



In these photos, 

Robert J. Ostrum, 

carpentry and building construction 

technology student 

from Port Alleghany, 

goes through the screening. 

Students in tlie College's practical 
nursing program helped with the hunter 
screening at Divine Providence Hospital 
last week. The hunter screening program 
seeks to have hunters get physical check- 
ups before "taking off' into the woods. 



$2.00 off my 16-incli, J-ilcm or moi 
One Coupon Per PUw 
™ Expires October 20, 1985 



: pina 



Fill, Free Delivery (Cusumer pays sales tax and botlle deposil) 



'1 



United Way progress reported 



LIMITED DELIVERY AREA 

1303 Washington Blvd. 
Phone: 322-2022 



Open for Lunch I 

11:00 a.m. - 1:00 i.m. Sunday ■ Thnnday ! 

11:00 a.m. - 2 a.m. Friday iSalarday ! 




After just one week of campaign- 
ing, the College has raised $3,079.24 for 
the Lycoming United Way (LUW) cam- 
paign, according to Frederick T. 
Gilmour and Wilham C. Bradshaw, 
chairpersons for the College's LUW ef- 
fort. 

As in previous years, this total has 
been greatly affected by the "generous 
giving" of several staff members, their 
report said. LUW defines a "generous 
giver" as one who pledges at least one 
hour's salary per week for a full year. 
Twenty-four staff members were Usted 
in this category during last year's cam- 
paign. 

Gilmour said,"Giving to the 
Lycommg United Way is a personal 



thing. Not everyone could or should be 
a generous giver... but everyone can and 
should give something." 

In last year's campaign, 66 percent 
of the College's staff contributed. This 
represented an increase over the 
previous year. 

While expecting 100 percent par- 
ticipation may be a bit optimistic, the 
chairpersons said, "it is hoped that at 
least some of the 34 percent who did not 
give last year will do so this year." 
Their report added, "After all, few of 
us can say we have not been helped in 
some way by one or more of the 34 
agencies representing the Lycoming 
United Way." 



PBL sale continues; adviser to speak; 
dues deadline is Thursday 

Phi Beta Lambda's "Curiosity Shoppe" sale will continue through this 
week with hours from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. daily, in the Academic Center lobby. 
Christmas items are featured and ranging in price from SI .95 to K. 

Paul W. Goldfeder, assistant professor of business and PBL's adviser, said 
he is reminding members dues are payable until this Thursday. 

Installation of Pennsylvania State University Phi Beta Lambda members 
will be held this Thursday at the Nittany Lion Inn, State College, with Goldfeder 
as guest speaker. He will be the guest of the University's Business Administra- 
tion Department. 



SPOIUGHTDMMriV, Od. U, UUaS 



SPOTLIGHT//!^... 

Dr. Robert L Breuder 



*College always 
emphasizes success 
and never failure' 



Dr. Robert L. Breuder has lived in this area since March 1981 when he 
came to fill the position of College president. 

Before arriving at the College, he served as provost for institutional ad- 
vancement at Brevard Community College, Cocoa, Fla. 

Dr. Breuder received his bachelor's degree in biology and German from the 
State University of New York at Albany. He received his master's degree in 
student/personnel services from the same institution. In 1972, he received a doc- 
torate in higher education administration from Florida State University. 
Enjoys ouldoor ictivities 

Although his responsibiUties as College president demand most of his time, 
Dr. Breuder enjoys hunting, fishing, and tennis as recreation. Dr. Breuder 
recalled a highlight of last year when he shot a 427-pound black bear. He cur- 
rently is in Colorado for a 10-day vacation - hunting elk. 

With respect to the College, Dr. Breuder stated, "We take great pride in 
seeing students choose to come to the College, complete their studies, and exit 
from this institution with whatever it is they came for." 
Sdcccm ittribated to new image 

He said the College always emphasizes success - and never failure. He 
believes the College helps students achieve their personal and professional goals. 

He attributes this success to the new image the College has obtained through 
the upgrading of campus facilities and new up-to-date programmmg and to the 
satisfaction of the College's clients: "those employers who hire our students". 

As College president, Dr. Breuder is responsible for the more than 400 
employees, all five campus locations, all College services, and over 60 different 
programs of study. 

He stated, "Of course, it is all done in concert with many others. I serve as 
the leader for this institution. None of my responsibilities could be aaomplished 
without the cooperative efforts of all the people who work here." 

Dr. Breuder lives in WiUiamsport with his wife, Jeanne, his daughters, 
Virginia, 17, and Allison, 12. His mother, Rosa, also Uves with the family. 




DR. BREUDER: 'We tike great pride...' icmnesy phoioi 



By Kithy L. Cobb 
Of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 
[Note: The SPOTLIGHTm^ feature about the College 
president was delayed to coincide with his birthday anniver- 
sary (Oct. 13).] 



Transfer Day today: 
open to all students 



At least 20 colleges will be 
represented today during College 
Transfer Day, according to Thomas C. 
Shoff, counselor in the College's Ad- 
visement and Career Services Center. 

From 1 to 3:30 p.m., the college 
representatives will be located on the 
first and second floors of the Academic 
Center. 

Shoff stressed that all students 
should make an effort to visit with the 
representatives even if, he said, they 
have never considered transferring to 
another college. 
All eligible lo transfer 

He said that students m all cur- 
riculums, mcluding technical programs, 
are eligible to transfer. 

He Usted the following institutions 
as among those which have confirmed 
their representation here today: 

Bloomsburg University, Indiana 



(of Pennsylvania) University, Penn- 
sylvania State Univenity (Main and 
Capital campuses), Geisinger Nursing 
School, Slippery Rock University, 
LaRoche College, and the Army 
Reserve. 

Evening session slated 

According to Shoff, another pro- 
gram will be operated this evening 
through the Lycoming County 
Counselors' Association. The program, 
titled "College Transfer Night", is 
slated to be held at Lycoming College. 

Last week, the Advisement and 
Career Services Center held transfer 
seminar in the Academic Center 
Auditorium in an effort to give students 
guideUnes about asking questions about 
transfer and about transferring to other 
colleges when work at the community 
college is completed. 



Walking Is good 
for your health 



...use the steps and 
leave the elevator for 
those who need It! 




6DSranJGHTnMi»4i;, Oct. 14, IMS 



. • \ 




> 




BALL, BALL... WHO'S GOT THE BALL? - Seems like there might hive been some confasion rmding the ball dar- 
ing the Intnmonl flag (oolbill gune lut week between the Pnrple Renobs and the Renegades. Later afternoon son 
worked a little "camera magic" of Iti own reflecting off lens - and gave photographer a couple more flying trajec- 
tories than he expected! ISPOTLIGHT pholoj 



College seal represents knowledge 
as key of life and key of growth 

The ofBrial College seal, designed by Frederick T. Gilmour, executive direc- 
tor of the College FouDdation, represents knowledge as the key to life, and as the 
key to growth. 

According to Gilmour, these messages are illustrated by symbols such as an 
open book, a key, and olive branches, which depict growth. The symbols at the 
bottom section of the seal denote specific curriculums: the gears symbolize 
mechanical programs; the dividers indicate drafting; the micrometer symbolizes 
machine shop; and the lightning bolt represents electronics. 

Gilmour said that he created the seal in 1965, at about the same time he 
designed the mace, when the College made the transition from Williamsport 
Technical Institute to a community college status. 





FREE 

Free... compliments of 
the Bookstore (LRC); Show as 
your FaU '85 ID card and 
receive an imprinted pass case 
with key ring. 



Intramural rosters 
still being accepted 

BasketlMfl 

Basketball tournament rosters are 
still being accepted, according to Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities. 

Teams may be male/female, coed, 
or individuals, full and/or part-time 
students. 

The rosters may be turned in or 
picked up in Room A 1 37, the Recrea- 
tion Center Office in the Lifelong 
Education Center. 

She said those wishing to par- 
ticipate who have not yet picked up the 
sign-up sheets may do so before 4 p.m. 
tomorrow. 
Volleyball 

Intramural volleyball rosters are 
due tomorrow in the Recreation Center, 
A137, Lifelong Education Center. 

Rosters may still be picked up to- 
day and tomorrow , but they must be 
returned by 4 p.m., according to Mrs. 
Fremiotti. 

Flag football 
standings posted 

Results after Week Two of the in- 
tramural flag football competition are: 

Monday, Oct. 7, Purple Renobs 
over Renegades, 40-16; Old Mil over 
*IRAQ Hawks. 

Tuesday, Oct. 8, Mean Machine 
over Busters, 70-12; Buster winner by 
forfeit; Cellar Dwellers over *Volts, 
20-18. 

Wednesday, Oct. 9, Scumbuzzards 
over Biuns, 32-6. 

*indicates team eliminated horn 
tournament. 

Week's schedule 

Monday, Oct. 14: 4 p.m.. Scum- 
buzzards vs. The McGuffs; 5 p.m.. Old 
Mil vs. Renegades; 6 p.m., Bums vs. 
Brue Crue. 

Tuesday, Oct. 15: 4 p.m., no 
game; 5 p.m., Buster vs. winner of Old 
Mil vs. Renegades; 6 p.m.. Cellar 
Dwellers vs. winner of Brue Crue vs. 
Bums. 

Wednesday, Oct. 16: 4 p.m., Mean 
Machine vs. Purple Renobs; 5 p.m., 
loser of Scumbuzzards vs. The McGuffs 
plays winner of Game lOA; 6 p.m., 
loser of Purple Renobs vs. Mean 
Machine plays winner of Game II A. 



pH HiVALUABLE COUPONIhh ■■ 

SHIEE PlIIAr 

I Buy euiy size Uttle Caesars 
Original round pizza at regular 
price, get the identical pizza 
FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GLVNT PLAZA 

3n-»m 



W.A.C.C. ilideili tan 
•ddltkiul lt« oiljr witk 
■tadnl I.D. ud IU> id. 

One coupon per customer. Cany out only. At participating locations. ■■ 



Bloodmobile here 
this week and next; 
donors needed 

The Red Cross is urgmg everyone 
in good health, weighing at least 110 
pounds and between the ages of 17 and 
65 to donate blood. Red Cross officials 
say an emergency exists. 

The Bloodmobile will be at the 
Natural Resources Management Divi- 
sion this Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 
p.m., according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

The Bloodmobile will also be in the 
Bardo Gymnasium next Tuesday from 
9:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m., according to 
Mrs. Fremiotti. 

Blood supphes have dropped to 
emergency levels in northeastern Penn- 
sylvania and donations must increase 
(kamatically in the next two weeks if pa- 
. tient safety is to be maintained in area 
hospitals, Mrs. Fremiotti said Red 
Cross officials have reported. 



SPOTUGHTDMoidiT, Oct. 14, IMSD? 





FOR SALE 
Have yonr own compoter terminal 
at home. System inclndes keyboard, 
monitor, and modem. Asking $200. 
Dill 398-2976. fadvt.J 



THEY'RE NOT RELAXIN' ~ Firefighters stretch ont on the ground after going through the "smoke muk 
trailer" which was bot one of the many exercises and experiences of Fire College Weekend Oct. 5 and 6. Standing at 
left b Wanna F. Brown, managing editor of the SPOTLIGHT and one of a team of four students who covered the 
event to gain hands-on experience. Editor's Note: While it may have been indicated Fire College Weekend coverage 
was to be this week, it will, in fact, be presented in a special soovenir section next week. |SPOTLIGHT photo by 
URoy S. Whitmire Jr.) 



Dr. Martin concerned over complaints; 
practice 'good neighbor tlieory' he says 

Dr. William J. Martin, dean of student services, recently expressed his con- 
cern over an influx of complaints related to off-campus student housing. 

According to Dr. Martin, his office has received telephone calls from area 
residents "complaining about stereos being played at late hours, students taking 
parking spaces, and so on." ^ 

Dr. Martin commented frankly that some of the complaints are "crackpot" 
- but he said many are legitunate "gripes". 

As a solution, he said he is emphasizing the "good neighbor" theory. In 
short, he said, while students have all the same rights and privileges as local 
residents, they should realize that they are obligated to be good, responsible 
citizens as well. 

He stated that residents should be able to hve in reasonable peace and quiet 
and that students should respect others' property and parking spaces. 

Dr. Martin commented, "For the most part, most people are pretty nice to 
you if you're nice to them." 



Definition of Vandalism: 



Dollaricide. 



' I ypmgcGunu u bvi •RnbMr sUfflpi 
•PriTitc Mill Bold •Kera 
•Puiport PholOf •Photo Copia 
•NoUrr Pablk •Renune Writing 

Monday thru Friday 9 a.m. ■ 6 p.m. 
Saturday 9 a.m. • 2 p.m. 



•Gilt Wnpping •Paclugiag Sipptki 

•Picluglil •Ekctronlc MiU 

•Auwotii Scrrkt •Word Procculiig 

•Gtttwnp SippUa •Term Pipcn 

PHONE 327-1766 



ProfMtlonal packaging and shipping of your mattrlala In mlnutar 

Wa'll ahlp your packaga via UPS or. If your packaga naada to gat thara quickar, < 

ahip It Air Expraaa for ovornlght dallvary. 



Contributions now being accepted 
for November W.A.C.C. Horizons 

Contributions now are being accepted for the November issue of W.A.C.C. 
Horizons, a creative writing and arts supplement to The SPOTLIGHT, accor- 
ding to Anthony N. Cillo, adviser to the student newspaper. 

"We are hoping to expand the scope of the next Horizons," Cillo said, ad- 
ding, "So we're hoping for more contributions from the College community." 

Plans call for publishing the next edition on Monday, Nov. 11. 

Students and all others associated with the College community are invited 
to submit photos, artwork, poetry, short stories, essays, puzzles and similar 
material. 

The deadline for submission is Friday, Nov. 1. 

All short stories, poetry, essays and the like must be typed. Photographs 
must be black and white prints. 



'JSU IP....... 

«■■■ ■■^iF^riii, 

416 River Avenue 



\ 



\ 



nAnnV'C open 6 a.m. to mUlni^t 

DJ\l\t\ 1 t3 Monday thru Friday 

Open Saturday I p.m. to 3 a.m. 

o) Barry says: We won't cook i burger before its time. 

Brooklyn Style Eatery 

•A Unique Eating Experience 

•BEST BREAKFAST IN TOWN 
•ARCADE AND POOL TABLE 
•DAILY SPECIALS 







234 Park St. Just across from 
PHONE 
3 23 -FOOD "" "'" ^'^^ parluiig lot 



SoSPOTUGHTDMoadij, Od. 14, 1N5 



Student Government officers elected, meetings set 



Greg S. Lange, ao accounting stu- 
dent from Lock Haven, was elected 
president of the Student Government 
Association. 

Tbe election was held for various 
offices at the regularly scheduled 
meeting last Tuesday, Oct. 8. 

Other officers are Gladys E. Huns- 
inger, an electrical technology student 
from Austin, vice president; Daria J. 
Beahm, an accounting student from 
Beech Creek, treasurer; Ralph T. 
Klugh, a diesel mechanic student from 
Williamsport, student awareness/com- 
munication officer; William J. Fritz, 



plumbing and heating student from 
Homer City, parliamentarian/student 
action officer, and George J. Pizzullo 
Jr., aviation student from Bristol, pro- 
gram development/evaluation officer. 

The secretary of the Student 
Government Association is the student 
who is managing editor of the 
SPOTLIGHT. This semester, that is 
Wanna F. Brown, journalism student 
from Port Trevorton. This person is an 
ex officio member of the SGA Executive 
Committee and is not elected by the 
SGA Senate. 

Officers will hold these positions 



Employment Opportunities 

SALESPERSONS, PART-TIME 

Radio Shack, Lewisburg, Pa. 17837, has openings for part-time salesper- 
sons, evenings and weekends, 20-35 hours a week. Stop in and ask for manager. 
/Iilformation supplied by director of Advisement and Career Services, Learning 
Resources Center./ 



PART-TIME SERVICE ATTENDANT 

Slonaker's Service Center, 510 E. Third St., Williamsport, will be hiring a 
part-time service attendant. Duties will include pumping gas, repairing tires, 
belts, hoses, and other minor repairs. High energy, personality-plus type person 
desired. For more information, call 326-2778. /Iilformation supplied by 
Slonaker's personnel./ 



Dance group to pefform 
tickets available now 

The College in cooperation with the Williamsport Area Community 
College Foundation and Commonwealth Bank and Trust Company is 
sponsoring a performance of the Pennsylvania Dance Theatre this Satur- 
day. 

The performance will be at 7 p.m. in the Academic Center 
Auditorium, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of Col- 
lege activities. 

Admission is free to College students with validated identification 
cards on a space available basis. 

Patron tickets are S5 and entitle holders to a reserved seat for tbe per- 
formance and a "meet the artists" reception in the Susquehanna Room 
following the show. 

Mrs. Fremiotti said she is urging students to purchase tickets in ad- 
vance to be guaranteed a seat. 

Additional information and tickets are available by contacting the 
Recreation Center, Room A 1 37, Lifelong Education Center or by 
telephoning College Ext. 763. 



Cillo's ^ 

College 
Corner 

PHONE Jl 

322-1321 ^ 

1100 W. Third SI. 
(Next (0 Academic Center) 
Come on over and get 
somethin ' good to eat! 



Your favorite Subs and 
Burgers (he way you like 'em 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 

Four winners ^ 
every week 

Open for Breakfast 

HOURS • Mon. thro Thnn. 

7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



until next spring's election. 

Officers must maintain at least a 
2.0 average, represent the student body 
in SGA decisions, and serve as role 
models and official student represen- 
tatives of the College. All officers except 
the ex officio secretary must post a 
minimum of four hours per week in the 
SGA office. 

Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities, will serve 
as the SGA adviser. She will act in an 
advisory capacity on all matters that 
come before the Senate and Executive 
Committee. 



The Senate will hold regular 
meetings ever other Tuesday during the 
Spring and Fall semesters. These 
meetings are open to the entire student 
body and begin at 5 p.m. 

The Executive Committee of the 
SGA will hold regular meetings every 
week in the Spring and Fall semesters on 
Tuesdays at 4 p.m. These meetings are 
open to SGA Executive Committee 
members only. 

Both the Senate and Executive 
Committee will meet in Room B107, 

Lifelong Education Center. 



Bulletin Board 

Week of Monday, Oct. 14 through Sunday, Oct. 20 

Alpha Omega... 7 to 10 p.m. this Wednesday, Oct. 16, Room 218, 
Academic Center. 

Circle K... 3 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 16, Room B107, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... noon, tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 15, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Multi-Cultural Society... 1 p.m., today, Monday, Oct. 14, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous... 7 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 16, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 15, Room 309, 
Academic Center. 

Student Government Association Senate... 4 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Oct. 15, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Family Lecture Series... "Problems of Marriage", from 7 to 9 p.m., 
tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 15, Young Women's Christian Association, 815 W. 
Fourth St. Must register today. Phone 322-4637 to register. Cost is $3 per per- 
son or $5 per unit of two. 




DANCIN', DANCIN', DANCIN' - The Phi BeU Lambda "Fill Kick Off 
Dance" Itsl Wednesdiy drew "a good crowd" iccordiiig lo adviier Paul W. 
Goldfeder. Music was proWdcd by WFXX, with Ron Wright, i former stodent 
of the College, "in control". /SPOTLIGHT photo by URoy 5. WhitmireJr.) 




^fiCHt 



'/V'ire 



Moidi;, Oct. 21, 1915 • Vol. 21, No.^* I Pifei* WUUtmiport Area Commuiit; Callc|e • WUIiimiport, Ft. 17701 



Student 
Government 

Association 

now is forming committees 

including units for Student Action, Student 
Awareness, Food, Program Planning and others. 
Students may join any committee, except the 
Budget Committee. And, Student Government of- 
ficers said last week, student input is needed from 
"outside Student Government". 
The newly-elected president of 
SGA, Gregory S. Lange, commented, 
"It is very important to get a better 
view of the different situations. 
Therefore, outside input is encourag- 
ed." 
The topics discussed at the SGA 
meeting last Tuesday (in Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center) were the 
Bloomobile visit tomorrow and 
Wednesday. The Bloodmobile visit on 
both days is from 9:45 a.m. to 3:45 
p.m. Students as well as the pubUc 
may volunteer to give blood. 
The SGA president said anyone 
interested in volunteering to help set 
up and dismantle equipment is asked 
to stop by the SGA Office, Room 
A138, Lifelong Education Center, for 
information. 
Also discussed at last week's SGA 
meeting was a dance to be held at 8 
p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 30. The 
dance is to be sponsored by SGA and 
WWAS-88FM, the College's student- 
operated radio station. 
It was reported at the meeting 
that the Student Government Associa- 
tion was requested to ~ and agreed to 
- assist the College with a program 
on Thursday, Oct. 31. 




LEADING THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION are uew ind retnrning scDilors: From left io 

front row are Barb K. Hebey, agribnrineis student from Jtntj Short; Kent M. Weaver, machine tool 

technology stodent from New Holland; Gladys E. Hnnsjnger, electrical technology student from Austin; 

Scott D. DIckenon, graphic arts student from Williamsport. In second row art William }. FriU, plumbing 

and heating student from Homer City; Karen L. Campbell, graphic arts student from Gouldsboro; Daria J. 

Beahm, accounting student from Beech Creek; Wanna F. Brown, journalism student from Port Trevorton. 

In third row are Robert J. Rymsza, graphic arts student from Williamsport; Matthew D. Davenport, forest 

technology student from Williamsport; John M. Bartnick, automotive technology stodent from Effort, and 

Gregory S. Lange, accounting and business management slndenl from Lock Haven. Other senators not 

pictured are Frank L. Hartley, agribusiness stodent from Kinzers; George J. PIzzullo Jr., aviition student 

from Bristol; Ralph T. Klugh, diesel stodent from Williamsport, and Dennis Watts, accounting student from 

Forksville. Officers are Ms. Beahm, treasurer; Ms. Honsinger, vice president; Fritz, pariiamenlarian/slodeni 

action officer; Lange, president; Klugh, stodent awareness/communications officer, and Pizzuilo, program 

development/evaluation officer. fSPOTLICHT pkolo/ 



ZaSPOTUGHTDMoiidir. Oct. 21, IMS 



imiiHHiiNiiiniMiiNiniiKUiHniiiiiiiinnr 



m 



Craig L. Hower, 

broadcasting student from 

Wiliiannsport: "No. The album 

content has not been disputed 

nationally. Only In sectors... 

Also, regulations cost money. 

We as consumers don't need 

Increased album prices. 

They're high enough." 




Karen S. Ludwig, broadcasting 

student from Trout Run: "No. 

They shouldn't be rated. If the 

Individual Is going to spend 

$10 on an LP, It's because he 

enjoys the artist and he Is 

going to expect to hear that 

performer's lyric style. If I buy 

an Ozzy album, I'm not going 

to be shocked if he uses a few 

off-color expressions." 



Whaddya' 
say...? 



[Whaddya' say? is a regular 
feature of the SPOTLIGHT. Opi- 
nions are collected at random 
and are ttie opinions of tfie in- 
dividuals quoted.] 



Ptiotos by: LeRoy S. Whit- 
mire Jr. 

Text by: Kelly S. Herrold 
Location:WWAS Radio Station 



Question: Do you think albums 

should be censured and have a 

label due to the content of the 

album? 




Janie Swartz, Instructor of 

mass communications: "I don't 

feel albums should be 

censored. It would be an 

infringement on our rights. 

However, labeling of content 

might be helpful for parents 

who have no Idea what their 

children are listening to. 

Research has Indicated that 

children are extremely 

influenced by what they see on 

MTV and hear on the radio." 



As part of an educational 

highlight, headiines were, for the most 

part, not used in the traditional manner 

in this week's SPOTLIGHT 

Instead, the first words of the article were set In what 

^.. would usually be headline-size type 

This was to demonstrate to students in journalism and 

mass communications an Important technique described in the 

classroom, according to Anthony N. Cillo, assistant professor 

of journalism and adviser to the SPOTLIGHT 



W^^^^ 




James G. Heck 

broadcasting student from 

Kane: "Yes, because some 

records have wholesome alf 

American messages that young 

children should avoid." 

[Editor's note: Yes, this is a 

direct Quote: Heck's comment. 

obviously, is tongue-in-cheek.] 




Frank J. (Pete) Nierle, 

broadcasting student from 

Williamsport: "Yes, I think they 

should be censored because it 

gives you an Idea of what kind 

of material Is on the album. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Mondty. Oct. 14, ms - Vol. 21, No. » 

The SPOTLIGHT l3 published each Monday morning ol the academic year ex- 
cept lor College vacations, by journalism and other Interested students of The 
williamsport Area Community College. 

.„5t"'^l "°°" '■ *t:ademlc Center, 1005 W. Third St., Wllllamsporl Pa 
17701, Telephone: (717) 326.3761, Extension 221. 

Opinions expressed are those of the student newspaper or of those whose 
names accompany items. Opinions do not reflect official opinion ol the Institution. 

THE STAFF 

Wanna F Brown. Managing edilor; Sandra L. Musgrave. Edilorlal Page Edllor 
LeRoy S, Whitmire Jr , Photography Editor; Kathy L. Cobb, Administrative Affairs 
Editor: Keliy S, Herrold, Student Affairs Reporter; Cynthia E, A, Hartranft Advertis- 
ing Director; (Michael A Dye, Staff Artist; Lyie A. Wagner, Production Coordinator- 
Timothy F Neldig, Photomechanical Darkroom Technician 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Galena M. Castlebury. Catherine A. Hannon, Dl-Anne I. Hess. Susan R Kalian, 
srud, Joel J, Mader, Lisa E. Secrlst. 
Faculty adviser: Anthony N. Cillo. 



students evacuated 

the gym, the Learning 

Resources Center 

and the Lifelong Education Center last 
Monday when a fire in the Bardo 
Gymnasium triggered alarms. 
The fire apparently started in a 
soap dispenser in a men's room in the 
gym and was moving up a wall, of- 
ficials at the scene said at the time. 
Two students were credited for 
alertness and promptness in reporting 
the fire. They are David L. Anderson, 
a diesel technology student from York, 
and Rosario Campisi, a food and 
hospitality management student from 
York and originally from Sicily. 
Anderson said, "I just changed 
clothes and was on my way to class 
when I smetled something burning and 
told the instructor. 
Under investigation 
Anderson then went back and 
operated a fire extinguisher while 
Campisi tried to "air out" smoke 
which was building up. The instructor 
asked Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities - whose 
office is on the first floor of the gym 
~ to telephone the emergency fire 
alarm. 
As alarms went off, many 
students in the Learning Resources 
Center and the Lifelong Education 
Center - which adjoin the gym - 
thought the alarms were simply 
malfunctioning or that there was a fire 
drill and were surprised to discover 
when they exited that there was a 
"real fire". 
According to Williamsport Fire 
Chief Wilham 0. Hayes, the fire was 
still under investigation last week and 
no definite cause had been estabUshed. 



SPOTLIGHTDMondiy, Ocl. 21,19«5d3 



Free... compliments of 
the Boolutore (LRC): Show ns 
your Fail '85 ID card and 
receive an imprinted pass case 
with Icey ring. 




LENDING assistance wliiie on temporary duly in Williamsport was a nnit of tlie Welisboro Fire Department last 
week when a fire in the Bardo Gymnasium canscd an early afternoon alarm. fSPOTUGHT phoio] 



Do High Prices Maki You Sad? 

y'jC'sTTvv Put on a happy face and 
f t> * \ sffop ft a great thrift store -- 



\^^^ You'll love us! 
The Exchange Mart 
314 W. 4th Street 




Any student 
who has school 
Insurance must 
come to Health 
Services 
Room 1 04, Gym 

...to obtain a claim 
form whenever they 
use the insurance. 
This must be filled out 
within 20 days 
of actual use. 



Hours: Tues. thru Thurs. 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Friday 9:30 a.m. lo 7:17 p.m. 
Saturday 9:30 a.m. to noou 



S2.00 off any It-inch, 3-iteni or i 
One Coupon Per Piat 
'" Expires October 27, 1985 
riSl, rree Delivery (Customer pays sales tax anil bottle tieposilf 



LIMITED DELIVERY AREA 



1303 Washington Blvd. 
Phone: 322-2022 



Open for Lunch 

11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Sunday - Tbunday 
11:00 a.m. - 2 a.m. Friday i Saturday 



BENSON 



tflffl mini. ^ 
/Bin market 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



4DSPOTLIGirraMoDiU;, Ocl. 21, 1M5 



GIVE BLOOD ! 



What would life be without it? 



A minute of giving 
could mean a lifetime of living 



''Station 23, structure fire, smolte visible, shooting flames, 
victim trapped in building. Proceed to 831 Anywhere Street." 



According to Robert Miller, area representative for the 
Pennsylvania Fire Academy, the fatality rate in the fire service is 
the highest in any industry-related occupation. 

Fire College Weekend trains and prepares firefighters to pro- 
ficiently handle any emergency situation with a minimal loss of 
human life and minimal structui\e damage. 



Hosted by the College each year since 1982, enrollment at 
Fire College has steadily increased from 200 to the approximate 
800 who attended the 1985 session held two weeks ago, Oct. 
5-6. 

This year, seventeen courses, all certified by the Penn- 
sylvania Fire Academy, were held on campus and at various 
locations throughout the area. 



"Technology does not save lives... people do." 



Fire College Weekend got off to its start early Saturday, Oct. 
5 with a slide presentation and a l<eynofe address delivered by 
James Dalton of the International Society of Fire Service Instruc- 
tors(ISFSI). 

In his speech, titled "You Will See It, When You Believe It," 
emphasized the importance of firefighters, not only in saving lives 
and property, but if fire prevention as well. He stated that more 
people-oriented firefighters who are more aware of current fire- 
fighting technology would result in less fires, less injuries, and 
less deaths due to fires in the future. 

"Technology does not save lives... smoke detectors will not 
save lives... but people do," he stated. He urged firefighters to 
train the public in fire prevention, and in what to do in emergency 



situations. He blamed ignorance and apathy on the part of the 
public for the higher toll of injuries and deaths due to fires. 

Dalton is a Fire Safety Education Technical Specialist with 
ISFSI, and is coordinating the National Community Volunteer Fire 
Prevention Program for the United States Fire Administration. In 
the past, he served as firefighter for the Silver Spring Fire Depart- 
ment, Silver Spring, Maryland, Fire Marshal for Montgomery 
County, Maryland, Department Training Officer and Assistant 
Chief, Silver Spring Fire Department, Chairman of ISFSI's Public 
Educator's Section. He presently serves as the Chairman of 
ISFSI's New Fire Prevention and Protection section. 

Dalton stated that he believes there is no other fire program 
as large as Pennsylvania's program. 



'Don't lose air...for we lose time." 



Smoke Mask, a two-day 
detailed course, provided 
firefighters with a review of the 
basic procedures for using the 
Self-Contained Breathing Ap- 
paratus(S.C.B.A.).The course 
was taught by Joseph R. Bailey, 
captain of the Fairfax Fire and 
Rescue Company, Fairfax, 
Virginia, Pennsylvania State Fire 
Instructor, and National Fire 
Prevention Association(NFPA) 
level four instructor in Virginia. 

"Firefighters can't enter a 
burning building without a self- 
contained breathing 
apparatus(oxygen mask)," 
Bailey emphasized in the 
classroom Saturday, held in the 
Automotive Trades Center. 
Thus, it is important each 
firefighter knows how to use the 
S.C.B.A. properly— there is only 
a minimal amount of air in the 
tanksC'packs"), which are worn 
on the back. 

The class was timed on the 
amount of time it took to put the 
25-pound lightweight packs on. 
(A 35-pound pack is generally 
used, however the lighter 
weight packs were used for in- 
structional purposes.) The 
firefighters were required to put 
their arms up, 'to see that the 
packs are comfortable," said 
Bailey. It Is important that the 
packs fit comfortably; the in- 



structor said, "Don't lose 
air. ..for we lose time,"— a 
crucial factor in firefighting. 

Bailey added, "All 
firefighters should be proficient 
in raising a ladder, using a hose, 
and wearing an S.C.B.A." 

He instructed on the proper 
procedure for careful removal of 
the S.C.B.A.— careless removal 
can result in hairs torn from the 
scalp. He also instructed on the 
proper method to put on the 
helmet, grabbing the cloth in-the 
back, and pulling it on, protec- 
ting the ears. 



A smoke trailer(semi-tractor 
trailer) was placed in the 
Automotive Trades Center park- 
ing lot for the second day's in- 
struction. The trailer was refer- 
red to as "the maze" by the 
firefighters, and was used to 
create the atmosphere of a real 
fire situation. 

John C. Martin, Jr., captain 
of the Hanover Fire Department 
No. 2 from Eagle Hanover, said, 
"lt[the mazejreally shows you if 
you've learned anything." The 
semi got its name--"the 
maze"-because of its construc- 
tion: like a maze, the interior is 




Students learn proper procedure tor wearing the S C B A [SPOTLIGHT 
photo by Donna L. Trimble] 



completely dark, and smoke- 
filled as well. 

"You're looking for one 
place to go— out," commented 
Michael J. Miosi, a volunteer 
firefighter. Station 17, Ralston, 
upon exiting the maze. 

Each student was required 
to enter the trailer, and complete 
the exercise before they ran out 
of oxygen. "I definitely knew 
what it was like to be trapped in 
a burning building and not be 
able to get out," one volunteer 
firefighter said upon exiting the 
smoke trailer. 

Bruce W. Pedersen, a 
graphic arts student at the Col- 
lege and volunteer firefighter at 
Red Hill Fire Company, Mon- 
tgomery, commented, "The 
maze gets you used to confined 
spaces, the air pack, the weight 
of it, and the darkness." 

Rob A. Pasco, a May '85 
College graduate in Diesel 
Mechanics, and volunteer 
firefighter from Station 10, 
South Williamsport, made it 
through the maze in a record 
eight minutes, using 700 
pounds of pressure in his tank, 
with no smoke in the maze. He 
added that this was the third 
year he had attended Smoke 
Mask training. 



Boat Rescue and Water Safety 



The Pennsylvania Fire 
Academy also offered a course 
in water rescue. Presented in 
two stages, this course was first 
held at the Lycoming College 
swimming pool, and then at the 
Susquehanna River, near the 
Arch Street Bridge. 

The course was designed to 
train firefighters in the most cur- 
rent techniques of boat rescue 
and water safety. In Phase I, 
held at the Lycoming College 
pool, the instructors, Thomas 
Eckert and Stanley Patt, 
discussed 'Basic Rescue 
Preparedness', and included ac- 
cident scene preplanning, self- 
rescue, and shore-based 
rescue. Personal flotation 
devices and rescue bags were 
implemented in this part of the 
course. 

Students also learned the 
self-rescue position-- 

accomplished by floating on 
one's back, facing downstream, 
and were required to be capable 
of comfortably swimming a 
distance of 50 yards. They also 
completed 100 yards wearing 
life jackets and clothing. 

Other requirements were: 
throwing the rescue bag 50 
yards with reasonable accuracy, 
learning to preserve body heat, 
the use of control lines and lear- 
ning to deal with water currents 
and undertows. 

According to Eckert, the 
rescue bag is used in many 
ways: to rescue victims who 
cannot swim, or is having dif- 
ficulty reaching shore, and to 
rescue a victim who might be 
trapped beneath the water, his 
foot wedged between the 
rocks. 

To preserve body heat in 
cold water conditions, Eckert 
said that a group of rescuers 
should huddle together to pre- 
vent hypothermia, a condition 
which could cause death. 

A control line is an air-filled 
fire hose, attached to a security 
line. This instrument is also us- 
ed for rescuing victims from 
water accidents. 

Also in Phase I, students 
created waves and whirlpools in 
the pool to simulate currents 
and undertows. They were then 
required to implement the self- 
rescue position, and float to the 
sides of the pool without losing 
control and flipping onto their 
faces. 

In Phase II, the class was 
bussed to the Susquehanna 
State Park for a field exercise. 
In the river they were able to im- 
plement all the techniques they 
learned in Phase I. 

Students also received in- 
struction on the different types 
of boats used in water rescue. 



In this session, they had access 
to rubber rafts and hard-bottom 
motor boats. Each student had 
an opportunity to operate both 
types of boats. 

In the late afternoon, in- 
structors supervised simulated 
accident and rescue situations. 
First, students were rescued 
from the river in rafts and taken 
ashore. Then, the class 
simulated a canoe rescue involv- 
ing two victims and a capsized 
canoe. 

Eckert emphasized the 
danger of hypothermia and the 
danger of suffering heart attacks 
in cold water situations. He 
related several accidental 
deaths which occurred on the 
eastern seaboard this past sum- 
mer due to hypothermia - most- 
ly involving cardiac arrest. 

A.J.Edkin, firefighter from 
Fire Station No. 5, Larry's 
Creek, stated, "Water Rescue is 
the best, most exciting course I 
have ever taken at Fire 
College." 

She added, "I enjoy 
firefighting immensely... the first 
time you help a victim, you are 
rewarded a million times over." 

Eckert is a lieutenant in the 
Department of Fire/Rescue Ser- 
vices, York, and is a certified 
state instructor in water rescue, 
Pennsylvania Fish Commission. 
Patt is currently deputy chief, 
Williamsport Bureau of Fire, and 
Pennsylvania Fish Commission 
Phase I Water Rescue instruc- 
tor. 

Eckert and Patt were 
assisted by Harry F. Seltzer, 
captain, Philip Hurne, engineer, 
and Mark Webster, lieutenant 
-all are with the First Ward Fire 
Company, South Williamsport. 





Students learn to handle a hard-bottomed motor boat. [SPOTLIGHT photo 
by Donna L Trimble] 



'Prevent 
Hypothermia 
...it could 
cause death.' 




The 'huddle' - a method for 
preserving body heat. [SPOTLIGHT 
photo by Donna L. Trimble] 





Industrial Fire Brigade.. .see page 6 lor 
related story. 



Students wait lor rescue boat in simulated 'capsized canoe' exercise 
[SPOTLIGHT photo by Donna L. Trimble] 




Aircraft 
Training Rescue 



%;5.^ 



students extinguish an oil fire with Aqueous Film Forming Foam(AFFF). 
[SPOTLIGHT photo by LeRoy S. Whitmire. Jr.] 

The CH54, cargo chopper, better known as "Charlie," is us- 
ed mainly for lifting disabled aircraft, said Ulichney. It is capable 
of lifting disabled tanks or "Hueys" as well, according to Wessel. 

The Pennsylvania State Police helicopter, based at the Mon- 
toursviile Airport was also used for instructional purposes. Den- 
nis A. Hoak, Pennsylvania state trooper, said the Bell Jet Ranger 
assists with aerial observation, and provides the overlook of 
crash scenes, or local government work such as the tornado that 
hit the surrounding area earlier this year. 

Wessel wore a proximity suit, which allows the firefighter to 
work within close proximities to the fire. Having a silver exterior 
and insulated interior, the suit keeps the wearer cool while work- 
ing near extremely hot temperatures. (For example, if the fire 
temperature were 1 20° degrees, the temperature inside the pro- 
ximity suit would be approximately 90° degrees.) 

On Sunday, the class battled a simulated fire behind the air- 
port. According to Wessel, the class was held at the "burn pit," 
where the Montour Oil Company dumped fuel, oil, and gasoline 
onto the simulated plane wreck and set it aflame. 

On the last fire they used a foam commonly known as 
Aqueous Film Forming Foam(AFFF). 

The class broke Into four crews and approached the fire from 
two directions. Standby vehicles were ready as backup. 

Chief Lynn Welty, chief of Montoursville, assistant instructor, 
ran the back up with members of his company. 

Wessel wore a proximity suit to start the simulation fires. The 
suit enables fighters to get in close to the blaze. 

The fire companies involved were Station 20 Montoursville 
and vehicles they used were Engine 20, Tanker 20, Station 19, 
the the Airport Engine 1 9 and Station 1 8, Loyalsock Tanker 1 8, 
Montoursville Ambulance 20. 

A total of five fires were extinguished. The first four were ex- 
tinguished with water and the fifth one with foam. 




In Aircraft Crash Rescue and Firefighting, students were in- 
structed in the basic tactics of fireground firefighting in the in- 
stance of an aircraft crash, and the proper procedures for rescu- 
ing the survivors. 

The instructors were Richard Wessel and Andrew Ulichney. 
While both are Pennsylvania State Fire instructors, Ulichney is 
currently fire chief of the Crash Rescue Fire Department at Fort 
Indiantown Gap. Wessel serves as a captain in the Henderson 
Hook and Ladder Company of Lewistown. 

Three military helicopters were used for instructional pur- 
poses in this class, and were supplied for the weekend's ac- 
tivities by the Crash Rescue Fire Department at Fort Indiantown 
Gap. 

The UH1 , better known as "the Huey," gained its fame for its 
success rate in the Vietnam War as a medivac unit, according to 
Wessel. 

Paul E. Strickler, Jr., chief warrant officer and pilot in the 
United States Army National Guard at Fort Indiantown Gap, 
stated, "The 'Huey' is used for troop transport, medivac and 
resupply." 

The 0H6, observation helicopter is used for observation, 
surveillance and reconnaissance, according to O'Neal D. Utiey, 
U.S. Army National Guard, first lieutenant. 




Oil fire burns out of control as 'burnpiV exercise begins. [SPOTLIGHT 
photo by LeBoy S. Whitmire, Jr.] 

The instructors for the class were Richard Wessel and An- 
drew Ulichny. The assistants were Stephen E. Schopfer, Lieute- 
nant, Loyalsock Volunteer Fire Company; Lynn Welty, chief, 
Montoursville Fire Department; Nancy Reynolds, chief. Pine 
Creek Ind. Volunteer Fire Company. 

For the "burn pit" Fire College officials used an old sofa, a 
petroleum barrel and an old rusted VW van, rather than actual air- 
craft to simulate the burning crash depris. 

According to Art Renn, Captain of Montoursville Station 20, 
"the foam makes a path in rescue, to rescue the people, the 
foam makes a seal(lays out in a blanket) it blocks the fire out 
faster -in seconds instead of minutes." He also said, "if the seal 
is broken it (the fire) can relight." 

The importance of fire control was stressed by Wessel when 
he said, "People survive the impact of the plane crash, but they 
often die in the fire that follows." 



The CH54('Charlie')helicopter .is used for lifting disabled aircraft. 
[SPOTLIGHT photo by Lisa E. Secrist] 




"...analyze the effects of fire 
behavior..." 



"Most people see only the spectacular outside views of a 
burning building-smoke pouring out of the windows, for exam- 
ple; they don't realize what really goes on inside a burning 
building." 

These remarks were made by Lieutenant(Lt.)Frank Miale, 
ladder company specialist for the New York City Fire Depart- 
ment, and a certified Fire Academy instructor for the states of 
New York and Pennsylvania. 

Lt. Miale, who has instructed Fire College Weekend's Truck 
Company course for three years, said, "I think Truck Company 
has been a neglected area of firefighting instruction. Fortunately, 
the state of Pennsylvania is beginning to recogize the need for 
further instruction in this area." 

Truck Company, according to Miale, offers student 
firefighters training in vehicle placement, search and rescue, ex- 
tinguishment, overall operations, ladder and aerial operations, 
proper water supply, forcible entry, location of concealed fire 
paths, proper use of equipment, and ventilation. 

On Saturday, students received classroom instruction in 
these areas. On Sunday, they moved to a vacant building on 
West Southern Avenue in South Williamsport, next to the 
Citizens' Hose Company, for hands-on training. Here, Miale 
said, students were required to complete several simulated exer- 
cises in order for the course's 16 credit hours to be credited 
toward their certification. 

In one activity, students learned the proper methods of ven- 
tilating a burning building. Miale and his co-instructor, John Pilat, 
who is retired from the New York City Fire Department and is 
presently a National Fire Academy instructor, emphasized the 
use of innovative ventilation equipment, like the Halligan bar. 

The Halligan bar allows far easier ventilation of windows, 
because it provides a uniform weight and, if manipulated in the 
proper manner, will break all the glass at once, according to the 
instructors. 

Miale added, "While the Halligan does not address the pro- 
blems of screens or storm windows, it does an excellent job of 
removing glass." 

Other tools used to ventilate burning buildings are pike poles, 
used for smashing first floor windows and as a pulling device, the 
closet hook which is a smaller version of the pike pole and is us- 
ed for ventilating confined spaces, and flathead and pickhead 
axes. 

Miale stressed the importance of locating concealed fire 
paths within burning buildings, and said that various ventilation 
tools and equipment can be used to complete this task. He and 
Pilat instructed students on various techniques in opening walls 
and ceilings with a minimum amount of structural damage. 
Students were given an opportunity to physically demonstrate 
those areas where fire travel is most apt to occur. 




student prepares to er>ter 'smoke 
maze'. [SPOTLIGHT photo by Dor\r\a 
I. Trimble] 




The instructors also conducted several exercises in search 
and rescue. Students were subjected to a simulated fire situa- 
tion, and were required to enter a dark, smoke-filled building and 
complete an obstacle course while wearing breathing apparatus. 

Students were instructed to act as though the building had 
collapsed, according to Miale. Because the firefighters' vision 
was obscured by the darkness and smoke, they followed a rope 
which led completely through the maze, and completed most of 
the activity on their hands and knees. 

After completing the maze, the instructors created a different 
scenario by reversing the obstacle course. Students were told 
one of their fellow firefighters was left behind, and were sent 
back into the building. 

"This scenario creates a whole new situation for 
firefighters... it's as if they're in an entirely different building. 
They become completely disoriented, "Miale said. 

The maze not only teaches students search and rescue 
techniques, but also emphasizes the importance of the proper 
use of breathing apparatus, instructors said. Before entering the 
building, the students are aware that they carry a minimal amount 
of air in their tanks. Therefore, they must finish their task before 
running out of oxygen and risking certain death. The tanks, ac- 
cording to instructors, are equipped with warning bells which in- 
dicate that their air is running short and they must move quickly. 

Students also completed a more complicated maze situation 
that Sunday afternoon. They were required to go through 
various holes in structure walls while removing breathing ap- 
paratus and retaining their face masks. Miale said artificially- 
generated smoke was not used in the exercise because of 
danger of smoke inhalation. 

All proper safety precautions are used during the completion 
of the exercises, Miale added. 

The goal of this Truck Company course, he said, is to enable 
firefighters to analyze the effects of fire behavior as it relates to 
truck company operations. 

William E. Henry, Chief, and Jeffrey Neyhart, firefighter, both 
of the First Ward Fire Company in South Williamsport, assisted 
Miale and Pilat in the weekend's activities. 



Instructor demonstrates the proper use of the Halligan bar. [SPOTLIGHT 
photo by Donna L. Trimble] 



SPOTLIGHT INSERT 
Monday, Oct. 21. 1985- Vol. 21. No. 9 
The Fire College insert was published through the efforts of 
the following SPOTLIGHT staff members: 

Wanna F. Brown, Managing Editor 

Kathy L. Cobb, Administrative Affairs Editor 

Lisa E. Secrist, Sports Reporter/Photographer 

Donna L. Trimble, Staff Reporter/Photographer 

LeRoy S. Whitmire. Jr., Photography Editor 

Special thanks go to Anthony N. Cillo. Faculty Adviser; 
Elaine J. Lambert, Interim Director of Communications; Grant L. 
Martin, Coordinator, Service Agency & Certification Programs; 
Dale A. Metzker, Associate Professor. Graphic Arts; and Patrick 
D. Murphy, Associate Professor, Advertising for their support 
and cooperation. 







% -*~T ■ ^^ 




Students remove a windshield in a simuiated exercise. [SPOTLIGHT 
photos by Lisa £. Secrist] 



Victims Trapped in Vehicles 



Industrial Emergencies 



Vehicle Rescue is a 
necessary part of rescue train- 
ing for firefighters. The course 
supplies the basic techniques 
for rescuing a trapped victim 
from a vehicle. 

The purpose is to develop 
the knowledge and skills 
necessary to assess a vehicle 
accident situation and to gain 
access to the trapped person. 

Instruction focused on self- 
protection and safety. The 
class was presented table top 
demonstrations of vehicle ac- 
cidents and instruction on tool 
usage. 

In hands-on training, the 
class broke into small teams, 
were given an assignment, and 
went to work on demonstration 
vehicles. As each team com- 
pleted the assignment, they 
were given additional instruction 
on other techniques. The teams 
removed window shields, side 
windows, and brake pedals. 
They also opened and removed- 
doors, and removed roofs. 

The class used hand tools 
such as the pry axe, the pry bar, 
the wrecking bar, cold chisels, 
hammers, hay hooks, large 
screw drivers, locksmith tools, 
pliers, wire cutters, sledge ham- 
mers and jacks. 

Gasoline and electric power 
tools were also used in this 
course. Tools such as the 
reciprocating saw, the four ton 
and ten ton porta power, air 
bags, air chisels, the Lukas tool 
and the Hurst tool were 
demonstrated. 

The Hurst tool is better 
known as the "jaws of life." It is 
a hydraulic high-pressure tool, 
usually powered by gasoline. It 
can be powered by electricity, 
and has various attachments for 
better utilization. The different 
heads which may be used are 
the spreaders, the cutters, and 
the andrams. 

The "jaws of life" are used 
mainly for vehicle accidents. It 
can also be used for farm ac- 



cidents, and aircraft crashes. 
Its main purpose is for the 
removal of trapped victims. 

According to instructors, 
this tool is scattered around the- 
country. Some fire departments 
do not have access to one. 

The course was instructed 
by Ronald Moore, senior fire 
training technician. New York 
State Office of Fire Prevention 
and Control. Moore was 

assisted by Richard Caschera, 
Loyalsock Fire Company, Carl 
Fenstermacher and James Bit- 
chy, First Ward Fire Company, 
South Williamsport, and Charles 
Snyder and Stan Winner, Mon- 
toursville Fire Company. 



Industrial Fire Brigade, a 
course which trained firefighters 
in methods of approaching fire 
emergencies in industrial type 
situations, was held entirely on 
campus. 

instructed by Paul Lesser 
and Herbert Dressier, both Fire 
Protection Coordinators for the 
Pennsylvania Power and Light 
Company, student firefighters 
learned to approach fire 
emergencies with the control 
devices readily available, and at- 
tack and extinquish the fire. 

According to Dressier, 
students received classroom in- 
struction in the use of different 
types of fire extinguishers, such 



Learning the Basics 



In Basic Firefighting, 
students were given instruction 
in laddering, rescue, use of 
breathing apparatus, hose line 
advancement, and control of fire 
streams. 

Instructed by Gary Ricken- 
bach, chief of the Richfield Fire 
Department, and Ronald 
Richards, fire marshal. Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania 
Department of Public Welfare at 
the Farview State Hospital, 
students spent Saturday on 
campus, practicing ladder ex- 
tensions. The class used two 
24-foot ladders and three 
35-foot ladders for this exer- 
cise. 

In simulated fire situations, 
students spent time perfecting 
skills in hose line advancement 
and controlling water release 
from the hoses. 

On Sunday, at the Hepburn- 
ville Carnival Grounds, Route 
15-North. -students attended 
field instruction on the use of 
breathing apparatus. This 

simulated fire situation involved 
the use of a smoke trailer and 
artificially-generated smoke. 



Rickenbach and Richards 
were assisted by Steve Helms, 
assistant chief. Citizens' Hose 
Company No. 2, South 
Williamsport; Irving Gleason, 
firefighter, Williamsport Bureau 
of Fire, and Richard Harris, in- 
spector. Independent Fire 
Department No. 1 , South 
Williamsport. 



as water, carbon dioxide, dry 
chemical and halon. He said 
they were also taught the use of 
overhead sprinkler systems, 
pipe systems, breathing equip- 
ment, hazardous materials and 
the chemistry of fire. 

On Saturday, outside exer- 
cises were held adjacent to the 
Auto Trades Center. Students 
were given the opportunity to 
extinquish pallet fires using dif- 
ferent fire extinquishers. In 
another exercise, instructors 
set magnesium fires using 
sodium cables, and students 
were required to extinguish the 
flames. 

Dressier is also First Assis- 
tant Fire Chief of Orangeville, 
Pa. Fire Company. Lesser is 
Assistant Fire Chief of Citizen's 
Hose Company, Freeland. Pa. 

Dressier and Lesser were 
assisted by Howard Wilt, 
Manager of Safety Systems, 
Glyco Chemical Company, 
Williamsport. 




students extinguish a pallet fire. [SPO T LIGHT photo by Donna L. Trimble] 



Buildings With Special Struc- 
tures 




students demonstrate the use of the Stokes basket. 
[SPOTLIGHT photo by Donna L Trimble] 




Smoke Mask. ..see page 2 lor related story. [SPOTLIGHT photo by LeRoy 
S. WhitmireJr.] 

Rescuing An Incapacitated 
Victim 

student firefighters received instruction in all forms of struc- 
tural rescue ttirougti ttie implementation of ropes, ladders, and 
various rescue equipment in a course titled "Fire Department 
Rescue". 

According to assistant instructor Barry C. Hutcfiins, 
firefigtiter/EMT, Pennsdale Volunteer Fire Company, basic skills 
such as building search and rescue, use of breathing apparatus, 
ladder work involving the rescue of a victim, and knots and 
harnesses were covered in classroom instruction. 

On Sunday, students participated in various field activities in- 
cluding the use of the Stokes basket, an instrument utilized when 
an injured victim must be lowered from a building or other high 
place. Hutchins stated that students were required to attach main 
lines to the baskets, tie the proper knots and basket bridles to 
complete the exercise properly. 

He also said that in a real situation, the Stokes basket Is 
usually passed off of a roof or out of a window and, at times, a 
truck or helicopter is involved in the rescue. 

Co-instructors for the course were Robert Smith, Penn- 
sylvania State Fire Instructor, and Kevin Thomas, captain of the 
Plymouth Fire Company No. 1 , Rescue Unit. 



Garden Apartment Fires, a 
course that prepares the 
firefighters to deal with fires in a 
garden apartment or townhouse 
structure. The course was 
taught by Randy Watts and 
Robert Clemm, both Penn- 
sylvania State Fire instructors. 

They were assisted by 
Vince Rundio, a firefighter from 
First Ward Fire Company, South 
Williamsport. 

This pre-planned course 
was held on campus Saturday 
morning and the class covered 
construction of garden apart- 
ments and townhouses as well 
as materials used. Watts said. 

Later in the afternoon, the 
class was taken by bus to the 
Garden Apartments at the 
Williamsport Home, in 
Williamsport, to study the con- 
struction of the three- 
dimensional building and to put 

Other Training 

other classroom instruction 
focused on various areas of 
fireflghting. Courses included 
were Fire/Arson Detection, 
Public Fire Education, Advanc- 
ed Fire Police, Basic Fire 
Prevention Inspection, Large 
Diameter Hose, Forcible Entry, 
Hazardous .Materials II, and 
Pump Operations. 

Instruction was presented in 
the form of slide presentations, 
films, demonstrations, and 
hands-on training. 

Although most classes were 
held on campus, hands-on train- 
ing for Forcible Entry was held 
at a vacant building site in South 
Williamsport. 

Pump Operations was held 
at the Third Street Pumping Sta- 
tion, Williamsport. Large 
Diameter Hose was conducted 
at the Williamsport Boat Docks, 
Susquehanna River. 



into practice what they had 
learned that morning. 

Watts said, "In case of a fire 
in such a building, the firefighter 
will know how the building is 
built, how to get in and where 
the water supplies are." This 
course will better prepare the 
firefighters for the time when 
they are confronted with such a 
situation, he said. 

The course also covered 
building characteristics dealing 
with concealed spaces, rescue 
problems in these types of 
buildings, access problems, and 
pre-plan information among 
other subjects. 

On Sunday afternoon, in the 
classroom, the class was 
presented simulated apartment 
fire procedures. 



Weelcend 
Injuries 

Two firefighters suffered in- 
juries over the course of the 
weekend. Susan Emick, 
volunteer firefighter, 

Williamsport, complicated an 
ankle injury Sunday while crawl- 
ing through the smoke-filled 
trailer at the Hepburnville car- 
nival grounds. Emick, who was 
treated for the injury at the 
Williamsport Hospital, was 
enrolled in the Basic Fireflghting 
course. 

City of Williamsport 
firefighter John Kemp was in 
jured while participating in the 
simulated airplane crash at the 
Williamsport-Lycoming County 
Airport. He was also treated at 
the Williamsport Hospital for first 
and second-degree burns to his 
chin. Kemp was enrolled in the 
Aircraft Crash Rescue and 
Fireflghting course. 




Engine 14. Old Lycoming Township Volunteer Fire Company. 
[SPOTLIGHT photo by Donna L. Trimble] 



I 

He's theW^ext door. ^ ^'WW^^^^^^'^ 

He's a man with a sharp m^ory 
of a little boy who never 
got over the excitement 
of ei^ines and sirens 
and smol<e and danger; 
He's a guy-like you and me 
with worries and 
unfulfilled dreams. 
Yet he stands taller than mos 
He's a fireman 
He puts it all on the line 
he bell rings 



In is at once the most li 
St fortunate of men. 

He^^man who savors life 

because he has seen too much 

He'^a gentleman 

Mlause he has seen too much 

Wthe awesome power 

of violent forces out of control. 

He's a man responsive to 

a child's laughter 

becau$e his arms have held 

too nriny small bodies 

ever laugh again. 



a mar\ Who appredtites 

the simple pleaures of Hfe. 
■t coffee held ii 
of fresh 
smo/ce and J^ 

'd for 



unbending fingers.. 
umping through 
lungs... 
•nese^ muscles 
yond feeling... 
the-^dUKS^rie of brave men... 
the dfvme peace of selfless service 
and a job jf/ell done 
in theMUhe of all men 

w ■ 

He doesn'H 




Departmer\t 



[SPOTLIGHT photo by Lisa E. Secrist] 



William G. Hayes, president, Central Area Fire Chiefs' AssociatJon(CAFCA), 
and chief, Williamsport Fire Department, commented that the attendc.,-)ce and par- 
ticipation of students in Fire College Weekend '85 demonstrated their desire to ad- 
vance their knowledge and practical skills so that they may better serve and protect 
their communities from the ravages of fire. He added that their attendance also per- 
sonified their dedication to the fire service. 

* * * 

Several College administrators cooperated with CAFCA to make Fire College 
Weekend a success. Participating were: Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College president 
Dr. James P. Rice, associate dean for educational advancement, Dr. James E Mid- 
dleton, dean of academic affairs. Grant L. Martin, coordinator of service agency and 
certification programs, Barbara A. Danko, director of Lifelong Education and A 
Neale Winner, coordinator of instructional media. 

Robert Miller, area representative for the Pennsylvania Fire Academy coor- 
dinated the weekend activities. 

Fire College Weekend is sponsored annually by the College, by the Central 
Area Fire Chiefs' Association, by the West Branch Fireman's Association and by 
the Lycoming County Department of Emergency Servtees 



SPOniGHTDMoiidiy, Oct. 21, 1985d5 



Wayne M. Parfitt 
had the fastest marathon time 

in the nation for a 19-year-old, 

according to the June 1985 issue of "Running Times" magazine. Parfitt, 
who ran track and cross country in high school, now is an auto body repair 

student from Pottsville. 
Last December, at the Philadelphia Marathon (26.2 miles), Wayne ran 
the 26.2-mile race in a time of 2 hours, 31 minutes, and 9 seconds - a per- 
sonal record which placed him 21 out of approximately 3,000 people. 
Parfitt's past achievements also include the State Community College 
Cross Country title - won on Oct. 27, 1984 with a time of 27 minutes and 3 
second, according to the Sunay Grit of Oct. 28, 1984. 
He represented the College for the last year of intercollegiate programs 

at the College. 
Philhp D. Landers, associate professor of business and an advisor for 
the Cross Country Club, said he would have been an adviser for the Na- 
tional Junior College Athletics Association (JUCO) this year. But, he said, 
"On Sept. 30, 1985, the administration of the College informed me that the 
College wouldn't join the association since it cost too much money for the 
amount of students being served." Landers added that he was disappointed 
for Parfitt and others who have the potential "but no chance to compete in 

JUCO". 
As far as Parfitt is concerned, he enters local road races now. He enjoys 
running in his free time and he is in training for this year's Philadelphia 

Marathon. 



Conrtesy report 

Students who need practical 
marketing experience are being invited, 
throughout the country, to enter the 
Philip Morris Marketing/Communica- 
tions Competition. 

For the 17th year, Philip Morris 
Companies Inc. invites students to 
research any of its non-tobacco pro- 
ducts and/or operations and submit a 
marketing/communications proposal 
that could suaeed in today's com- 
petitive business worid. 
Money iwinb lifted 

Winning teams in both the 
graduate and undergraduate categories 
will receive first place awards of $2,000, 
second place awards of S1,000 and third 
place awards of $500. 

Representatives from the winning 



Practical marketing experience offered in contest 



teains will be invited, with their faculty 
advisers, to be the company's guests at 
the company's worid headquarters in 
New York Qty - where they will pre- 
sent their projects to the judges and to 
company executives. During their stay, 
the winners will visit an advertising 
agency, tour the city, and attend a din- 
ner and awards luncheon in their honor. 
How to enter 

To enter the contests, students cur- 
rently enrolled in accredited universities 
or two-year colleges should prepare pro- 
jects under the supervision of a faculty 
inember or a recognized campus profes- 
sional society. 

Committee size should be three or 
more at the undergraduate level and two 
or more at the graduate level. Student 
ideas must related to the non-tobacco 



TZ 



■VALUABLE COUPONIi 



IFREE PIZZAI 



I Buy any size Uttle Caesars 

■ Original round pizza at regular 
price, get the identical pizza 
■ FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8M0 



W.A.C.C. itidnti MTC 
•dditkHud 10« oily witk 
itidnt I.D. ud (U> id. 



j_ One coupon per customer. Cany out only. At participating locations. 



products or operations of Philip Morris 
Companies Inc., which include The 
Seven-Up Company, Miller ^Brewing 
Company, Lindeman Wines, and Mis- 
sion Viejo Realty Group Inc. 
DeadUoe In Janoary 

Entries are due Jan. 10, 1986. 

According to the company news 
release, projects might focus on 
marketing, advertising, public relations, 
government relations, urban affairs, 
cultural affairs, economics, etc. 



Upon request, an information kit 
containing an annual report, entry 
form, brochures about various 
operating companies of PhiUp Morris 
and other pertinent material will be pro- 
vided. 

Questions about the competition 
should be directed to the competition 
coordinators, Geoff Gimber and Cyn- 
thia Hawkins, Philip Morris Inclor- 
porated, 120 park Ave., New York, 
N.Y. 10017. The telephone number is 
(212) 880-3525. 



BARRY'S 




Open 6 a.m. to miibiighl 

Monday thru Friday 

Open SMudoy 1 p.m. to ) a.m. 



Barry says: We woi'l cook § bvger before Iti timt. 

Brooklyn Style Eatery 



•A UNIQUE Eating Experience 
•Best Breakfast in Town 
•Arcade and Pool Table 
•Daily Specials 



323-FOOD "*' "'* ^^' parking lot 



fiaSPOTUGHTDMooiUy, Od. 21, IMS 




SPOTLIGHT///^... ByKitbyL 



Dr. James R. Rice, 
associate dean 

for educational advancement, 

is a native of Richardson, Texas. He received 

- his education at the University of Texas, Austin: His bachelor's degree is in 

English literature, his master's degree is in foreign language education, and 

his doctorate is in educational administration. 

Dr. Rice has been employed by the College for two years. He previously 

worked as coordinator of developmental education at Steilacoom Community 

College, Seattle, Wash. 

As associate dean for educational advancement, Dr. Rice is responsible 

for the Center for Lifelong Education, the Library, and the Media Center as 

well as for curriculum development and staff training in all 55 programs 

offered by the College. 

He currently is working on curriculum development and staff training 

for the Advanced Technology and Health Sciences Center which now is 

under construction. 
A former Peace Corps volunteer, he has travelled to Korea. He has also 
spent two years in Japan. In his spare time. Dr. Rice enjoys jogging and 

swimming. 
Dr. Rice and his wife, Mimi, have two children: John, 4, and Caithn, 

1. 
Cobb, of The SPOTLIGHT staff 




JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

Houn: Mon.-Sil. 11 •.m. lo 9 p.m. CloMd Sandi; 

Monday Regular Sub Whole $1.60 

Tuesday Meatball Whole $1.75 

Wednesday Turkey Whole $1.40 

Thursday Ham Whole $1.80 

Friday Tuna Whole $1.70 

Saturday Cheese Steak Whole $2.50 

•Subs All Handmade to .Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" $4 whole $2.10 half 



If You Want to Use Drugs... 

That's Your Business 

If You Want to Stop 

That's Ours! 

There is Help... 

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS 

Wednesday Meetings 

7 P.M. to 8 P.M. 

Room B107 

LIFELONG EDUCATION CENTEI^ 
(LEC) 



The open gym 

and weight room 
scheduk is as follows: 

Today, Monday, Men. Oct. 21: 

Open gym 5 to 9 p.m. Table tennis 

is from 6 to g p.m. Weight room is 

open from 4 to 10 p.m. 

Tuesday, Oct. 22: No open gym. 

Weight room open from 4 to 10 p.m. 

but closed from 7 to 8 p.m. for 

classes. 

Wednesday, Oct. 23: Open gym 

from 4 to g p.m. and wei^t room 

open from 4 to 10 p.m. Open soccer 

will be held from 4 to 3:15 p.m. 

Table tennis will be held from 6 to 8 

p.m. 

Thursday, Oct. 24: Open gym 

from 4 to 10 p.m. Weight room from 

4 to 10 p.m. also. 

An intramural 

basketball clinic 

for officials will be held this Thursday 

in the Gym from 8 to 10 p.m. 

The clinic is open to anyone 

interested in officiating intramural 

basketball. 

Those who attend are being 

reminded to wear clean gym shoes, 

according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 

Fremiotti, cocordinator of College 

activities. 



SPOTUGHTDMoidir, Oct. 21, IWSD? 




Hamu serrices ttadents involTcd with the Peer InfonnitioD and RefemI Center irt (sealed, from left) 

Donna L. Eriaton, of DiDTille; Shiron A. Doebler, of Lock Hitcd; Sharon A. Andma, of WUUamiport; 

PriKiUi M. HaU, of WilUtmiport, and, standing, Mary Ann FUlpkowiU, of Pictore Rocks; Joseph P. 

Matnider, of WUlianuport, and Alexb M. Kandra, of Hnnuneb Wharf. Andrea P. Brain of WQUamiport 

wu no) present when photo was taken. ISPOTUGHT pholo] 



Le Jeune Chef menus for week 

Le Jeune Chef, the student-operated restaurant, luncheons are served Tues- 
day, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
pi«> TomoiTow, Tnesday, Oct. 22 

Soup du jour: French cheese soup, 75 cents a cup and 80 cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon: Grecian chicken pita, cup of soup, beverage, $2.50. 

Special for the day: Beef paprika, Alaskan nuggets, green bean bundles or 
carrot daisies in butter, roll and beverage, $3.25 

Desserts: Peanut butter cream cheese pie, 75 cents; snowballs, 55 cents, and 
butterscotch marble cake, 75 cents. 

Wednesday, Oct. 23 

Soup du jour: Beef vegetable soup, cup 75 cents, bowl 80 cents. 

Ught luncheon: Red and green holiday salad, cup of soup, roll and 
beverage, $2.75. 

Special for the day: Chicken cacciatore, Chantilly potatoes, suaotash or 
way beans almondine, roll and beverage, $3.25. 

Desserts: Raisin pie, 75 cents; chocolate cream pie, 75 cents; German 
chocolate cake, 65 cents. 

Thorsday, Oct. 24 

Soup du j6ur: Swiss potato, 75 cents a cup, 80 cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon: Open face Swiss beef platter, cup of soup, beverage, $2.85. 

Special for the day: Pork chop dijonasse, rice pilaf, brussel sprouts 
parmesan or cheese scalloped com, roll and beverage, $3.50. 

Desserts: Sour cream pound cake, 65 cents; cream cheese mousse, .'iO cents, 
and assorted pies, 75 cents. 

Friday, Oct. 25 

Soup du jour: Chinese sweet and soursoup, cup 75 cents, bowl 80 cents. 

Light luncheon: Seafood crepes, roll and beverage, $2.85. 

Special for the day: Filled cabbage, mellow vegetable duo or butter carrots, 
crescent roll and beverage, $3.25. 

Desserts: Banana cream pie, 75 cents; lemon merangue pie, 75 cents; 
chocolate filled roll, 70 cents. 



The Peer Information 
and Referral Center has been 

an additional source of help for students 
seeking such help since its inception at the start 

of the last Spring semester. 
Anyone is welcome to use the services of the peer center which is 
operated by studentsenroUed in various curriculums, according to co- 
ordinators Ms. Sharon (Sherry) A. Andrus, Williamsport, and Ms. Sharon 
A. Doebler, Lock Haven, whose resposibilities include insuring that the staff 
meets the objectives of the program. 
Although they are not professionals and they do not offer counseling 
services, they can be instrumental in helping students realize their options 
and if needed, offer referrals to sources inside and/or outside of the college if 
additional services are required. 
The formation of the center was brought about by students who 
recognized a need for a program that would assist them in a non-official 
capacity with their problems. The informal atmosphere of the center and 
wide range of ages represented enhance this feeling and help students feel 

more comfortable. 
Staff members feel that because of having had similiar experiences and 
problems as other students they can empathize with fellow students problems. 
Their main objective is to keep students in school. 
Stress, personal problems, parents, money, housing, tests, grades, pro- 
blems with instructors, forming friends, drugs and alcohol related problems 
are among some of the worries encountered by the peer center. 
Students are encouraged to use the center which guarantees confidentiali- 
ty. It is located in Room 105 in the gymnasium. 



Phi Beta Lambda 
meeting: 
Tuesday, Oct. 
22, Room 329, Academic 
Center. 



IIVIPORTANT 

meeting. 

IVIembers please 

attend. 



SaSPOTUCHTDMonitoy, Ocl. II. 1985 

. o o □ D BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Ocl. 21 through Sunday, Oct. 27 
MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega FeDowship... 7 to 10 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 23, Room 

218, Academic Center. 
Gamma Epsilon Tau... noon tomorrow, Oct. 22, Room B107, Lifelong 

Education Center. 
Multi-Cultural Society... 1 to 2 p.m., today, Room B107, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 
Phi BeU Lambda... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 22, Room 329, 

Academic Center. 
Narcotics Anonymous... 7 to 8 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 23, Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center. 
Student Government Association... Executive Committee, from 4 to 5 
p.m., Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 
Family Lecture Series... "Midlife Crisis", 7 to 9 p.m., tomorrow, Tues- 
day, Oct. 22, YWCA, 815 W. Fourth St.; must register today; phone 322-4737. 
Cost is $3 per person or $5 per unit of two. 
Alpha Omega Fellowship... weekend retreat for members only, Oct. 25 to 
Oct. 27 at Canton. Price is approximately $7 per person. More details will be 
mentioned at the meeting Wednesday night. 
Bus trips... through the College Activities Office are "filling" rapidly and 
the only way to reserve a seat Is to pay In advance; those who have not paid 
are being asked to do so as quickly as possible: A reminder from Mrs. JoAnn 
R. Fremlotti, coordinator of College activities. 



The first-year 

catering stndentg 

will be going to the National 
Restaurant Show In New York City on 
Nov. 11, according to Mrs. Ann R. 
Miglio, assistant professor of food ser- 
vice and hospitality. 
The students will be spending the 
evening at a buffet at Shawnee-on- 
the-Delaware. 



Olio's 

College 
Corner 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Phone 322-1321 

HOURS • Mod. thru Thurs. 
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Open for Breakfast 

if if i^ 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 

Four winners 
every week 

• • • 

Your favorite Subs and 

Burgers the way you like 'em 

Come on over and gel 
somelhin' good lo eal! 



Phi Beta 
Lambda will 

continue its "Curiosity 

Shoppe" sale by taking orders 

through this Friday in Room 3, lower 
level. Academic Center, according to 
Paul W. Goldfeder, assistant professor 
of business and the organization's ad- 
viser. 
He said he expects the merchan- 
dise ordered to arrive about Nov. 6. 
Goldfeder also reported last week 
that the United Way Drive will be 
continued through tomorrow with Phi 
Beta Lambda members soliciting In 
neighborhoods near the College. 
"This is our way of helping peo- 
ple less fortunate than we are," said 
Goldfeder. 
Chairperson for the drive Is 
Richard L. Evans, a business accoun- 
ting student from Phillpsburg. 
The organization has been invited 
by the Lycoming Lung and Health 
Association to assist with the holiday 
fund-raising. A committee vrill be 
formed at PBL's meeting to be held 
tomorrow at 3:30 p.m. In Room 329, 
Academic Center. 



FOR SALE: 1978 Chevy 4x4, 
Silverado pickup. 400 cu., 
rebuilt 350 Trans., Gumbo 
Monster N/Tudders, Roll Bar, 
Daul Tanks. Very Good Condi- 
tion. Contact: Steve Eisele-843 
VV. Third Street, Williamsport, 
rm. 4. after 7 p.m. 



^^A big push 

during the final 

week is needed 

in order lo put 

the College's 1985 Lycoming 

United Way Campaip over the 

top," according to WilUam C. 

Bradshaw, director of 

experiential learning and one of 

the co<hairpersons for the 

College effort. 

As of Wednesday, Oct. 16, 

the College was nearly $3,000 

short of Its goal of $8,500. It is 

significant, Bradshaw said, that 

only 91 persons from a total 

staff of over 470 have 

contributed. 

"It is hard to believe that 

so many people could Ignore the 

needs of the 34 agencies 

represented by the L.U.W," 

Bradshaw said, "particularly 

when the good things they do 

touch all in some way." 

He added, "We can only 

hope pledges roll in by 

Wednesday, Oct. 23 [this 

Wednesday] and make It possible 

for us to report that The 

Williamsport Area Community 

College folks did their part by 

giving their fair share of the 

$1,170,000 L.U.W. goal. 

"That would really show 

that 'Love Makes the 

Difference'." 



Employment 
Opportunities 

This information is provided by per- 
sonnel in the Advisement and Career 
Services Center in the Learning 
Resources Center. Inquires should be 
directed lo those personnel. 
MACHINE OPERATORS 
Chem-con Corp., Renovo, Pa. 17764, 
is interested in hiring full-time evening 
machine operators (lathe). Could 
possibly be used for co-op. Contact 
Deborah Barry, personnel manager at 
(717)923-1163. 
CARD SALESMEN 
Love Letters, 1127 HlUsvlew Terrace, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15220, has openings 
for representatives to sell greeting 
cards to stores. Twenty (20) percent 
commission; bonuses available. Call 
Jan at (412) 344-5754. 



The 
SPOTUGHT 

will not 

be published 

next Monday 

to permit 

staff and system 

reorgaoiztion 



\ Peer Information and Referral I 



Complete 
Confidentiality 




Room 105 
Gymnasium 
Hours: 
Mon.-Thurs.: 
10 a.m.-8 p.m. 

Friday: 

10 a.m.-4 p.m. 

Closed Weekends 



Center - 



If you have a problem, 
come and talk to us 
whether the problem 
is major or small 



Students helping 
fellow students 



^'>>^'»i^^ms}mi>m<if»!i}m&imi>m^>mcimKmKymKymr)mcmtcmK}mK> 




OTLIGHT 



Monday, Nov. 4, 198S • Vol. 21, No. 10* 4 Piga 



WDUimiporl Am Commnnit; Collete • WUIiamiport, Pt. 17701 



Board revises, approves budget 



The College Board of Trustees met last Wednesday evening, Oct. 30, to 
discuss, among other issues, the newly revised College budget. According to Dr. 
Robert L. Breuder, College president, because of concessions made to the 
Williamsport City Council concerning variable stipend money to be received 
from the state. College deemed it necessary to re-evaluate the budget which was 
approved by the Board in September. 

He added that while changing stipend allocations would not effect the ex- 
pense side of the budget, various changes were necessary on the revenue side of 
the budget, and the College "vrill have to operate on less money." 

Dr. Breuder stated that one of the difficulties in balancing the budget at this 
point in time, is that the College is yet unaware of the total amount of stipend 
money to be received from the state. He said, "Initially, we were to receive $1.6 
million. Now because of enrollment circumstances, our besti estimate is $1.2 
million. 

The stipend funds were originally allocated to help offset the deficit caused 
buy the UVi percent drop in enrollment, and to lower the tuition costs of non- 
sponsoring students. Because of the disagreement with city officials, part of that 
money is now earmarked to help offset city sponsorship costs as well. 

The newly revised budget is as follows: Operating Budget~$12,585,934, 
8.24 percent lower than the budget approved in September; Capital 



Budget~$4,523,515, 57.79 percent higher than the approved budget. The in- 
crease is the result of state revenue for bond payments. The overall new budget, 
in summary, is $17,109,449, 3.18 percent higher, the result of which is, accor- 
ding to Dr. Breuder, "we are taking a step back to where we were July 1st". 

As a result, according to Dr. Breuder, departmental cuts were made, in- 
cluding some salaries, employee benefits, supplies, and other expenses. Also af- 
fected were student tuition costs. 

While tuition costs for sponsored students stood approved at $1,149 in 
September, the Board approved a new figure of $1,326 per academic year. 

Newly approved tuition costs for non-sponsored, in-state students are: 
$2,844. In September, the figure approved by the Board was $2,366. 

For out-of-state students, newly approved tuition costs will be $3,784, 
whereas in September, the figure stood as $3,389. 

Dr. Breuder concluded his report, saying, "If the enrollment trend con- 
tinues, we must generate more revenue to cover the expenses we are about to ex- 
perience." 

In reference lo the Williamsport City Council, and the concessions made on 
the part of the College, he said, "If the city does levy a tax, it will not be 
because of us." 



Stipend issue solved, problems forecast 



Recently, College administration 
became involved in a dispute with the 
Williamsport City Council concerning 
distribution of variable stipend money 
the College had been allotted by the 
State. Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, described the dispute as non- 
hostile, but said that concessions made 
by the College will exacerbate the pro- 
blems that arose with the loss of the 
school districts' sponsorship. 

According to Dr. Breuder, city of- 
ficials were concerned because the revis- 



ed 1985-86 budget did not allot any of 
the variable stipend money toward the 
tuition costs of city-sponsored students. 
Dr. Breuder said, "We (the College) felt 
, that the bulk of that money should be 
used to offset the tuition costs of non- 
sponsored students." 

He added that in doing so. College 
administration hoped to offset the 12 
1/2 per cent drop in enrollment which 
occurred this fall. 

To negotiate an agreement on this 
issue. College administrators and 



Bloodmobile exceeds limit 

"The bloodmobile went very nicely. We exceeded our goal of 440 pints 
which we are thankful for," said Mrs. Hallie H. Luppert, blood service coor- 
dinator for the American Red Cross Lycoming Chapter's visit to the College. 

Held at the College's Bardo Gym Oct. 22 and 23, the Bloodmobile netted 
463 pints. There were 15 deferrals. 

At the end of the first day, Mrs. Luppert reported that 220 of a 260 pint 
goal had been reached. However, Wednesday's total of 244 pints more than 
made up the difference. 

Before giving, prospective donors passed through a series of steps, including 
a Hemoglobin check (the testing of blood iron content), taking of temperature 
and pulse, and the'giving of each person's history, (various medical questions 
concerning diseases, medications and illnesses). 

After donating, each person was escorted to a table and offered a snack, 
which helps raise the blood sugar level. Each donor is required by federal 
regualations to remain there five to ten minutes to recover. 

"The blood will be used in Northeastern Pennsylvania," Mrs. Luppert 
reported. 



trustees met with city officials in a 
lengthy, closed-door meeting, Tuesday, 
Oct. 22. The result involved conces- 
sions by the College to credit part of the 
stipend money toward tuition costs of 
city students who are eUgible. In addi- 
tion, any of the state stipend money for 
which city students are eligible will be 
credited against the city's share of their 
tuitions, according to Dr. Breuder. 
Therefore, the city will be alleviated of 
any tax increases due to College spon- 
sorship through 1986. 

Dr. Breuder stated that because the 
College is obligated to balance revenue 
expenditures, recisions will have to be 
made-recisions that will effect some 
programs and services offered by the 
College. He said that some class sizes 
will have to be increased, and 30 staff 
and faculty vacancies that arise will not 
be filled. 

He commented, "We caimot spend 
more money than we are taking in. ..we 
are required to balance our budget. 
Therefore, we will have to take a serious 
look at some of the programs and ser- 

Race ends today 

The Race Across the States ends to- 
day at 4:00 p.m. in Recreation Center, 
Room A 137, Lifelong Education 
Center. 



vices we offer to determine if they are 
self-sufficient. If they are not, and we 
are unable to carry the financial load, 
we will have to terminate them. We 
cannot provide what our revenue does 
not provide for." 

Dr. Breuder emphasized that any 
stipend money received for eligible non- 
sponsored students will go to cover the 
20 per cent deferral program will pro- 
bably be non-existent in the future. 

To date, the College has not been 
notified by the state as to the amount of 
the stipend ftmd. It is expected that the 
money will be available by early 
December 1985. 

Employment 
Opportunities 

Radio Shack. ..sales person wanted, 
Susquehanna Valley Mall, SeUnsgrove. 
Full and part-time. Inquire in person, 
ask for Manager. 

College Bookstore. ..will be hiring4 
students for Spring Rush. The dates of 
employment will be Dec. 9 through Dec. 
20, 1985 and Jan. 6 through Jan. 31, 
1986. Interested students see Mrs. 
Holcomb, in the Bookstore this 
Wednesday, Nov. 6. 



iDSPOniGHTDMondir, No?. 4. 1M5 

Whaddya' 
say...? 

IWhaddya' say is a regular feature of 
the SPOTLIGHT. Opinions are col- 
lected at random and are the opinions 
of the individuals quoted./ 
Photos and interviews 
By LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. 
Location: Gymnasium Lobby 
Question: 

Who do you predict will win the 
world series and why 

[At the time of questioning, 
the St. Louis Cardinals had 
won the first two games of 
the series against the Kan- 
sas City Royals (at Kansas 
City). In the 83-year history 
of the series, no team has 
ever come back from losing 
the first two games at 
home. Until now, when the 
Royals defeated the Car- 
dinals 1 1-0 in game seven. 
The Cardinals at one point 
had a lead of three games 
to one, but the Royals battl- 
ed back not only to win the 
pennant, but also to make 
world series history.] 





Gloria E. Anderson, dietary 
technology student from War- 
ren: "The Yankees for all I 
know." 




Alexis M. Kandra, human 
services student from Hummels 
Wharf: "Who's playing?" 




Frank C. Di Johnson, con- 
struction carpentry student from 
Lebanon: "St. Louis, because 
they have a better team." 




Mindy L Shaffer, graphic 
arts student from Punx- 
sutawney: "Royals, because 
they are the better team." 




Jeffrey D. Eskra, construc- 
Michael W. Beaver, tion caprpentry student from 
refrigeration and air conditioning Lower Burrell: St. Louis. The 
student from Bloomsburg: St. Cardinals have a two game lead 
Louis, because they beat the and chances of the Royals com- 
Mets." ing back are slim." 



College Campaigns Successful 



CONGRATULATIONS AND A SPECIAL THANKS to all those who par- 
ticipated In the Lycoming United Way cannpaign and the Red Cross Blood- 
inoblle drive. Both endeavors were overwhelming successes and, once 
again, demonstrate the commitment and contributions of the W.A.C.C. family 
to the community. I want you to know that I personally appreciate your con- 
tribution and feel a great deal of pride to be President of an Institution with so 
many concerned and caring individuals. 



Thanks again, 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder 

Student Seeks Change in Policy 

To the editor: 

On Thursday, Oct. 1 0, I had the misfortune of leaving my car lights on all 
day In the school parking lot, the result of which was a dead battery. Having 
no jumper cables and striking out with the few students who hadn't left for 
home yet, I thought It logical to ask Security for a helping hand. At Security, I 
encountered four very bored looking uniformed gentlemen. One told me It 
was no longer their policy to jump-start students vehicles. I explained to him I 
commuted nearly forty miles to school every day and would have to summon 
someone from Sellnsgrove If I did not receive help. He suggested I call AAA 
(to which I am not a member), or call a local garage. 

Eventually I asked Dorothy Slattery at the information desk If she knew of 
someone who could give me a hand. She called around the campus until she 
found someone. John Vitali, superintendent of Food Service, provided the 
assistance I needed. I shall take this opportunity to publicly thank these kind 
people. Thank you! It was not In their job description to help a student in a 
pinch either. 

I later contacted the office of Donald Peterson, dean of general services, 
and head of Security. Through his secretary, he gave me three reasons why 
he Instituted this policy. The first reason was that Security has other duties. 
Well this seems fairly obvious. They weren't performing any duties when I en- 
countered them, though. The second reason they gave me was complaints 
from local garages that the school was taking business away from them (no 
Joke: they actually told me this). Let's hear it for mechanic's rights! Perhaps 
the local mechanics won't mind If we ask them to subsidize part of our tuition If 
this is true. 

The third reason was a possible safety hazard to Security personnel. I did 
3 little research and found the college has a total of up to six million dollars of 
comprehensive general liability Insurance coverage and many more policies 
that would cover just about anything. Furthermore, If Security was afraid of 
getting a bump on the head from a falling hood or a battery blowing up in their 
faces (I couldn't find statistics on how many batteries blow up a year), they 
could have just loaned me jumper cables, for goodness sake. 

By the way. If someone In Security has a dead battery, the College Ivlotor 
Pool will jump their car, no problem. 

Ifs unfortunate, but little inconsiderate acts can really detract from an 
otherwise enjoyable educational experience. Some common courtesy-type 
services shouldn't be too much to ask for. If Itis, and you drive to school, put 
jumper cables on your Christmas want list and look for me If you need a hand. 

Mike hoover, computer science student from Sellnsgrove. 

SPOTLIQHT 
Monday, Nov. 4, 1985 - Vol. 21. No.10 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept for College vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The 
Wiiliamsport Area Community Coiiege. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center. 1005 W. Third St., Wiiliamsport, Pa. 
17701 Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 221. 



THE STAFF 

Wanna F. Brown. Manag/ng Editor 
Sandra L. Musgrave. Editofiai Page Editor 
LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr., priotograpiiy Editor 
Kathy L- Cobb, Administrative Affairs Reporter 
Kelly S. Herrold. Student Affairs Reporter 
Cynthia E. A. Harfanfl, Advertising Director 

Lyie A. Wagner, Production Coordinator 

Timothy F Neidig, PMT Darftroom Technician 

fiiichaei A, Dye, Staff Ariist 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Catherine A. Hannon, Di-Anne 1. Hess, Susan R, Kallansrud. Joel J. Mader, Lisa E 
Secrist, Donna L. Trimble. 

Faculty adviser; Anthony N. CIlio, 



W.A.C.C. 
HORIZONS 



Season of Change 



nature moaned 

with the change of the wind; 



dark clouds smothered 
the blue light 
from the sky, 
giving the landscape 
a greyish tinge; 



the foliage 

took its last gasp 

as 

a deceptively fresh rain 

began to pelt 

the earth, 

battering 

each flower, 

each blade of sweet, 

green grass 

to a crumpled mass 

of autumnal defeat; 



the trees 

screamed in anguish 

as their children 

oozed crimson and gold blood, 

finally falling to 

a thick carpet of Death 

on the cooling ground. 



It had come. 




Ktttfy L Cobb 



2aW.A.C.C. HORIZONSaMoidir, No?. 4, IMS 



NATURE'S ODYSSEY 



Lonely Heart 



lEditor's note: Nature's Odyssey is being published a second time because it 
was published with unsolicited changes to the author's copy. The 
SPOTLIGHT regrets any inconvenience/. 



Hey, lonely heart, 
What's doing, 
Don't ciy now, 
It's not that bad. 



By Kathleen Summers 

As I began my daily trek across the Maynard Street 
Bridge, I was vaguely aware of a strange and exciting feeling 
in the air. I was inspired to slow my pace and do some 
serious investigating. As I became more aware of my sur- 
roundings, I realized that a light blanket of fog had settled 
over the face of the waters and was wrapping itself around 
me. It was as though I had suddenly transversed the barriers 
of time and space, and I had entered the secret chamber of 
my fantasies through a hidden door. 

I sensed something magical about the morning. . . a feel- 
ing of peaceful splendor. Instead of plodding aimlessly 
along, I began to gaze purposefully around me; my heavy 
footsteps became smooth and graceful, almost cat-like, as I 
stealthily advanced, as If to sneak up on a mysterious visitor 
who had taken refuge in the veils of mist. 

Suddenly my eye was caught by a solitary jeweldrop. . . a 
lonely dewdrop that had been captured by the silvery gleam 
of an adventurous ray of sunshine as it dripped from a shim- 
mering spider web. I was immediately enraptured with the 
beauty of the scene which presented itself to me, for I could 
see nothing but an impressive procession of dewy 
cobwebs. One of these precious marvels had been 
deposited for safekeeping in nearly every opening of the lat- 
ticework railing protecting the walkway. The result was an 
enchanting exhibit of nature's finest artwork. Each opales- 
cent labyrinth of silken thread had been expertly weaved in a 
delicate pattern, and each boasted of a beauty all its own. 
But although separate and unique, they united to form a tan- 
talizing tapestry of lace and gemstones. 

The authors of this dazzling display were nowhere to be 
found. As I pondered the creation of these magnificent 
showpieces, I decided they must be enjoying a well- 
deserved rest, for it seemed to me as though the expert tat- 
ters had been working all night long. I envisioned them toil- 
ing over imaginary looms, their work illuminated only by the 
incandescent wink of the moon. Except for the occasional 
inquisitive wink of an evening star, the master craftsmen 
continued their assignment uninterrupted as they diligently 
bent to their task, conspiring together to compose a cantata 
of magical wonder. Their mission was a success, for it in- 
spired with awe the souls of every passerby; and its image Is 
etched permanently in my memory as my heart enfolds 
forever the gentle wonder of nature's Odyssey. ••• 



I know, I know, 
You're hurting bad, 
Breaking to bits and pieces, 
At the lightest touch. 



Change youi option. 
Be light and free, 
Your too serious. 
There's plenty of time. 



Life is forever, 
For those who wait, 
Never mind worry. 
It's prayer for evil. 



Someday, somehow, 
When least expected, 
Love sunounds you, 
A great heaUng begins. 



You will be mended, 
Finally becoming whole, 
Satiiied in union. 
But wait a second. 



A two sided coin. 
Don't be disappointed. 
To hurt is to love. 
To love is to hurt. 



Be glad you can hurt, 
If only a little while, 
Like I said, 
Love will heal. 



Robert L. English 




W.A.C.C HORlZONSDMoidir, Not. 4, insa3 



IWIiile fishing al Bald Eagle Creek, outside 
Mill Hall SPOTLIGHT photography editor. 
LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. captured this scene./ 



< 



Representation in Black and White 



A raven soared unfettered 
across a midnight sl<y 
The crashing of waves below 
were silenced by his cries 



He circled 'round the boundaries 
of his proudly stalked domain 
And gloried in the knowledge 
God had graced him with this reign 



Don't Run Away 



Please, don't run away 
you'll only make me 
chase after you. 



I won't run on endlessly 
for I hate fooUsh games 
wasting precious time. 



A skein of geese with flippant ease, 
Encompassed him In flight 
And taunted him with beatin wings 
that echoed in the night. 



The raven fell upon the beach. 
Devoid of pride he lay. 
They failed to see his tear-stained eyes 
Before they flew away. 



You'll be caught eventually 
only to end up chasing 
your own heart's desire. 



So please, don't run away 
come join hands with me 
we'll run away together 
Hfl)LESSLY! 



Lyle A. Wagner 



Lisa Rae Williams 



4dW.A.C.C. HORIZONSDMondty, No?. 4, IMS 



The Revelation of Lessie 




By Kathy L. Cobb 

"And that is the end, Lessie," breathed wrinkled, ederly Jed 
Buck. "Would you like to hear another?" He raised his twinkling 
jet black eyes, waiting for her reply. Lessie Covington had fallen 
asleep, her head tilted to one side, and her tiny puckered lips 
parted. Chuckling, Jed closed the hardback edition of Grimm's 
Fairytales and slowly lifted his weary body. "Funny," he thought, 
"I hadn't heard her delightful little snores. Well, I believe I'll just 
tuck her in and finish up." Releasing the lock of the squeaky 
wheelchair, he carefully and gently wheeled Lessie from the day 
room. 

Later, while Jed swished an old gray mop about the halls of 
the Harris Home for the Aging, his thoughts remained on the 
mellowing woman in Room Ten. "How sweetly innocent," 
thought Jed, "that someone Lessie's age had not been touched 
by the misfortunes of life. If only everyone were like little 
Lessie." He was so deep in thought that he did not hear the 
echoing footsteps of eighteen year-old Eddie, his partner. 

"Jed? Jed, why ain't ya workin'? What're ya doin'7" he in- 
quired. The wrinkled face turned in surprise. "Why, I hadn't 
known I had stopped. Did you finish the polishing?" Eddie, 
puzzled by Jed's strange behavior, tucked in his shirttails and put 
his polishing rag in an empty pail. 

"Sure did, Jed." He paused, afraid of prying. Hesitating, he 
went on in a curious manner. "Is somethin' wrong? Ya seem to 
be doin' a lotfa thinkin' lately. Is there somethin' I can help ya 
with?" 

"Help? Why, no, youngster!" beamed the greying old man. 
"No. ..no. There is absolutely nothing wrong. No." His low 
chuckle only furthered Eddie's confusion. 

Scratching his ear, Eddie's usually alert young face was 
masked by puzzlement. "Aw, come on, Jed! Somethin' must be 
goin'on! You been actin' weird." "Well, boy, do you know Miss 
Lessie Covington in Room Ten?" Eddie, blatantly chewing a wad 
of stale peppermint gum, nodded. "Well, she's a wonderful little 
woman. I was just thinking of her." 

A look of amused discovery overtook Eddie's features. "Ah 
hah! So yer in love!" He laughed, embarrassing the fading old 
man Suddenly Jed began mopping as furiously as his old, stiff 
limbs would allow. 

Bowing his head, Eddie lowly said, "Sorry, Jed. Didn't mean 
to embarrass ya." 

In silence, the two janitors worked in the dim hallway. The 
only sounds were the swishing of mops and a faint melody which 
came from a radio at the nurse's station at the end of the hall. Ed- 
die awkwardly broke the silence. 

"Hey, Jed, ain't that old lady sick in her head or somethin'?" 
Jed paused in his tedious labor, then resumed mopping. 
"Mildly retarded, son, mildly retarded. That's what makes her so 
beautiful. She's so innocent, like a young child. She's never had 
to go through what embitters most people. " Once again he paus- 
ed, smiling, and the crowsfeet around his eyes crinkled. "Ah, 
yes. Little Lessie." 

Leaning against the whitewashed walls and inhaling the pine- 
fresh cleanliness of the institution, Eddie thought that maybe he 
and his friends had been wrong about mental retardation. 

"Yeah, Jed, I guess yer right," he said after a brief moment 
of thought. 

Kneeling to wring out the mop, Jed puffed, "Well, boy, are 
you ready to go home?" Turning pale, Jed was suddenly out of 
breath. His eyes glazed over and he gasped for air. 



"Jed! Jed, are ya okay? Want me to call a nurse?" Eddie 
began to panic, but Jed put a shaking hand on his arm when the 
color began to return. Helping the old man to an upright position, 
Eddie brought a dirty white handkerchief from his back pocket 
and handed it to his older partner. Jed's shaking hands gratefully 
took It and raised it to his glistening forehead. 

Feebly, he replied, "No. ..no, don't call a nurse. I'll be alright. 
Don't worry about me. Let's just go home. Son, will you finish 
up?" Without waiting for a reply, he turned and shuffled slowly 
away. Keeping watch on Jed until he turned ttie corner, Eddie 
shook his curly locks in worry and disbelief. 

The next day was only a five hour workday, and when Jed 
didn't come in, Eddie began to worry. Especially after last 
night... and he knew he'd never be able to talk his friend into see- 
ing a doctor. Although Jed hadn't complained, Eddie knew he 
hadn't been feeling well for the past few weeks. 

As he pushed the dust mop through the quiet hallway, he 
thought, "Well, I'll just hafta go over and see old Jed when I get 
done here." A short while later, after he scrubbed the handrails, 
swept the basement floor and emptied the trash, Eddie went out 
into the drab, rainy weather and made his way toward Jed's 
apartment. 

Jed lived in a rundown part of town, in Eddie's old 
neighborhood. Eddie was glad to move from the "slums" and in- 
to the local YMCA. It wasn't as nice as some people's homes, 
but it wasn't as dirty as the old neighborhood. As he walked 
through the rutted, broken street, a misty rain falling on him, he 
noticed that nothing had changed: overflowing trash cans set 
beside crumbling doorways, ragged clothes hanging forgotten 
on dirty clotheslines, broken toys scattered in grassless yards. 
He felt sorry for Jed. Too bad the old man had to live in such a 
dirty place. 

"He deserves better," Eddie thought bitterly. But Jed had 
no choice. He had to live in that dusty, dingy apartment. His 
salary was meager, and he was too proud to accept welfare or 
social security. At times he barely had enough to eat, and Eddie 
knew that he hadn't seen a doctor in years. 

Eddie rounded a corner and Jed's crusty tenement came into 
view. He saw that Jed's windows were dark. Becoming worried, 
he ran up the crumbling concrete steps. Dodging broken floor- 
boards and shattered glass on the porch, Eddie pushed open the 
cracking, weathered door. It was dark inside, and pieces of 
broken lightbulb crunched underfoot as he felt his way up the 
stairs. A horrible stench of wet plaster and sewage nearly over- 
whelmed him. He wondered how his old friend could bear to live 
in such a place. 

When the young janitor came to Jed's door, he found it 
slightly ajar. Cautiously pushing it open, he could see Jed's 
silent form on the bed. His breathing was shallow, but at least he 
was alive. Eddie rushed over to the window, pushed back the 
ragged curtain and opened the sash. A gust of warm, wet spring 
air filled the room, getting rid of the aw^ul smell. 

Going over to Jed and nudging his sleeping body, Eddie 
said, "Jed, can ya hear me? Wake up, Jed! I'm scared." After a 
moment, Jed's eyes flickered open and he stared at the boy in 
the dim light. 

In a weak voice, Jed asked, "What are you doing here, boy?" 
"Are ya okay, Jed? Ya look real sick. Did ya eat today?" 
"I'm fine, boy, just fine. I need rest, that's all." A wracking 
cough shook through him and he could barely breathe. 

"But did ya eat, Jed? I can fix ya somethin' if ya want. Ya 
hafta eat, Jed!" Eddie crossed the small room and searched the 
cupboard for some food. He found a can of sardines, a can of 
vegetable soup, a half-loaf of moldy bread, and some stale 
crackers. As he began to prepare a small meal, Jed merely wat- 
ched from the bed. He was so weak that he hadn't moved since 
Eddie had found him. Finally, after warming the soup in a rusty 
old pan on an old hotplate, Eddie went over to the bed. Jed's 
eyes were grateful, but sad. 



W.A.C.C. BORlZONSDMondiy, No*. 4, mSOZ 



"I can't eat, son. I can barely lift my hand." 
"That's okay, pal. We'll fix it up somehow." He helped Jed 
struggle to a half-sitting position and propped a wilting pillow 
behind his head. He lifted a spoonful of soup to Jed's tips, but 
the old man stubbornly refused. 

"What's wrong, huh, Jed? I ain't the best cook, but at least 
it's food!" 

"No, Eddie, don't feed me. I'll do it." He tried to lift the 
spoon, but only spilled some soup on the worn blanket. Eddie 
took the spoon. His friend silently let him feed him the warm li- 
quid, his pride broken. Worried, Eddie sat on the edge of the 
bed. 

"Will ya go see a doctor, Jed? I'm real scared. Please, 
Jed?" 

The old man shook his head. "No, son, I'll be fine." 

"But Jed—" 

"Don't be frightened, Eddie. I'll be fine, I tell you." 

Eddie frantically tried to think of a way to persuade him to go 
to the hospital. Suddenly a thought popped into his mind. 

"What about Lessie, Jed? She wouldn't want to see ya so 
sick. Would ya go to the hospital for her?" He crossed his 
fingers, but Jed still refused. 

"AW, Jed! Ya know ya can't go back to work 'til ya get bet- 
ter. Ya won't be able to see her unless ya go to the doctor an' 
get some medicine so's ya can get better." 

Still, he shook his head. "I can't, son. I can't pay a doctor's 
bill. I haven't got the money." 

Eddie was becoming impatient. "No excuses, pal. Ya hafta 
see a doctor!" 

His eyes wide, Jed said, "But the money..." 

"Don't ya worry about the money. We'll see someone at the 
social security office." His eyes swept over the dirty one-room 
apartment with its sparse furnishings. 

"Ya can't live like this no more, either. No wonder yer so 
sick! Anddon'ttryandtellmeno, either, Jed." He began to look 
for some clothes to put on Jed. 

"Don't bother, son. I'm already dressed." Eddie pulled back 
the thin cover. His friend was still wearing his dirty janitor's 
uniform. 

"Poor Jed," Eddie thought. "He musta really been sick last 
night." He took a comb out of his back pocket and combed the 
old man's white hair. 

"Can ya walk?" He gently asked. 

"No, son. I'm too weak. Look behind the closet door. You'll 
find an old cane. Maybe I can use it. If you'll help me." 

Digging through a pile of dirty, oily rags in the dark closet, 
Eddie finally found the cane. Studying its age, he hoped it would 
support Jed without breaking. 

"Don't worry, Jed. Everything will be okay. You'll see. The 
doctor will fix you up and you'll get to see Lessie real soon." 
Handling the cane to Jed and putting his arm about his shoulders, 
he cautiously pulled him to his feeet. The sick old man swayed 
dizzily and sat down again. 

Crying, Jed said, "I can't son. I can't walk. Let me lay 
down." 

Hesitantly biting his lip, Eddie eased him down on the bed. 
Within a few minutes Jed was asleep. Fighting the anguish well- 
ing up inside of him, Eddie pulled the blanket up to Jed's 
shoulders, turned and ran out of the apartment. 

Nearly an hour later he returned with a paramedic. He had 
tried to get a doctor, but the hospital would only send a 
paramedic. 

Jed was just as the boy had left him: asleep on the rickety old 
bed. The paramedic went over and examined him. Within 
moments he put a call through to the hospital. Soon an am- 
bulance was sent speeding on its way. With Eddie's help, he 
soon had Jed on a stretcher and ready for transport. Jed would 
have to be amitted to the hospital for professional care. 

"But, Mister— will he be okay?" 



The paramedic would only answer, "I hope so, Eddie." The 
ambulance shrilled and Jed was on his way to the care he need- 
ed. Eddie sat on the musty, squeaky bed and cried. 

During the days after Jed was admitted to the hospital, Eddie 
worked double shifts in the home. He spent his free time clean- 
ing and decorating Jed's apartment with the extra money he 
earned. Although he really wanted to visit Jed, he didn't have 
enough time— so he spent what little time he had preparing for 
Jed's homecoming. One night he stopped one of the nurses at 
work and asked if she had heard anything from the hospital. 

She replied, "He's still too ill to be released. But don't worry, 
Eddie. He'll come back to work soon." 

At dawn the next day, Eddie went to work hoping that Jed 
was back. Checking in at the spotlessly clean nurse's station, he 
went down the hall to the supplies closet. He hung his greasy 
jacket on a peg and began to gather his janitor's tools: a clanking 
old pail, a gray mop, several rags, and a jar of pine jelly. Hearing 
a sound behind him, he turned, expecting to find Jed. Instead, 
Nurse Haggerty, the extremely overweight and haughty head 
nurse, stared down at him from her towering stance. 

"Did Jed come in yet, Miss Haggerty? I didn't see him in the 
Dayroom. Isn't he out of the hospital yet?" 

Haggerty insolenty responded, "Jed Buck won't be coming 
in anymore. He died last night. Your new partner will be in 
tomorrow. For the time being, the Visitor's Room needs to be 
scrubbed." She stalked off, ignoring the boy's shock. He back- 
ed against the wall, for his knees had weakened and tears slid 
down his cheeks. 

"How can she act like that," he furiously thought. Inhaling 
deeply, he collected his supplies and headed for the Visitor's 
Room. 

Scrubbing angrily, his tears mingled with the dusty water. 
"Poor Jed. He was just like a father to me," thought the grieving 
boy. "I shoulda known with the way he was actin' that night." As 
he finished scouring the floor, he opened the windows and let in 
the cool spring air. About an hour later, when the floor had dried 
and he was polishing furniture, Haggerfy tramped in, her white 
shoes squeaking on the tiles. 

"The families are arriving," she rasped like a drill sargeant. 
"Put your supplies away and wheel the patient in Room Ten to 
the Recreation Room." 

Flabbergasted, Eddie stammered, "But that's not my job..." 
She narrowed her eyes and retorted, "If you like your job, 
you'll do as you're told!" 

"Yes, ma'am," he gulped. "But ain't that Lessie? Ain't her 
family comin' today?" 

As if speaking to a thoughtless, stupid child, the nurse said, 
"Miss Covington has no family," and turned on her heel and strut- 
ted away. 

Eddie could do nothing but obey his superior. After he 
returned everything to the supply closet, he sautered down the 
hallway to Lessie's room. Until now he had avoided seeing her, 
because she reminded him of Jed. 

Hearty laughter came from the Visitor's Room. Eddie felt sad 
for the little old woman who would never quite understand what 
had happened to the sprite old man who had been her only 
friend. Now she had none. Hesitantly, he pushed open the door 
and saw a tiny figure seated in a wheelchair near the window. He 
quietly went over to Lessie, and stood next to her. 

He stammered, "Uh...Miss Covington. I'm Eddie. ..Jed's 
partner. . Jed had to be away... so, uh I came to keep you com- 
pany," 

Lessie's puckered lips were bent in a happy smile. "Why, 
hello, sonny. The sunshine is really beautiful today. Just look at 
the lovely flowers." 

Enlightenment filled Eddie's heart, just as the sunlight filled 
Lessie's eyes. For Jed and himself, he went on. 

His voice chocked with tears, "Miss Covington... would you 
mind... if I called you... GRANDMA?" 



6aW.A.C.C. HORlZONSDMoadi;, Not. 4, IN5 



TEARDROPS 



Teardrop, 
sliding down 
my face spout, 
you caused my lips, 
to frown and pout, 
why have you gone 
and deserted me. 
bringing forth 
nothing, but 
misery! 



Tears, 

running, 

streaking, 

across my cheeks. 

release my emotions, 

listen how my heart speaks. 

bring forth the inner relief, 

my tortured mind seeks. 

let my weary eyes, 

burst open, in 

soft genlJe 

leaks. 



Teardrops, 
tiny teardrops, 
trickle, then nio. 
bring to me comfort, 
silent remedy for my pain, 
wash and cleanse my spirit, 
until only joys remain, 
until new visions, 
I shall 



Tears, 

flowing, 

gushing out. 

come and turn, 

my very world about. 

don't let me break down, 

don't make me shout. 

please, just let my... 

confussion 

out!!! 




[Artwork done hy Timothy W. Abbot, air conditioning/r^igeration student from Hershey.] 



Journey Into Darkness 



Lyie A. Wigncr 



Open up, 

dark, enq>ty pit of Death 

and 

swallow me 

in all your greediness; 

descend upon me 

with your 

grunts and growls, 

gulping 

the last of my soul 

with one final 

bubbly 

burp. 



KathyL Cobb 



How I Spent My McDonald's Coupons 



W.A.CC. HORIZONSDMoBdi;, Not. 4, IMSD? 



Time is not some abstract concept. That clock up there is living proof. We 
must all live within the confines of our very limited time on earth. I would like 
to think everyone would try to get the most out of every minute they have. This 
is not true, however, and it is becoming increasingly harder to get through the 
day without some bozo wasting my time. 

No matter where you go, or what you do, somebody is waiting there to 
waste your time. Seemingly simple, every day, routine activities can become 
long, drawn-out affairs at the hands of uncaring time wasters. Has any of the 
following happened to you?: 

You felt like you were trying to get Bruce Springsteen tickets, but actually you 
%ere just trying to buy books for the first day of school. 

You are in an"express" lane at the supermarket and you notice you are the only 
person who actually has seven items or less. 

You are at an AM/PM and you can't get to the gas pump because the guy who 
pumped his gas ahead of you decided to leave his car where it was and do two 
weeks worth of grocery shopping. 

Once you pull up to the pump, you can't get the clerk's attention even though 
you are franticly waving the nozzle in the air. 

If not, it will; maybe even today. If you do not mind wasting your time, 
I'm wasting your time right now, but since you don't mind, you might as well 
read on. 

If time is money and cost is life, I should be rich. The reason I am not rich 
is there are not adequate laws to protect me. Time wasting is not often enough 
looked upon as the serious crime that it really is. Murphy's Law states that if 
something can go wrong, it will. Hoover's Law states that if someone can waste 
your time, they will. With this in mind.I shall propose some new laws aimed at 
protecting the fine, non-time wasting citizens such as yourself. I will also give 
examples of instances in which these laws could be applied. 



Law One: Waste my time, pay a fine. 



I went to McDonald's Wednesday after English class to use the two 
coupons 1 received from Mr. Coates. 1 pulled up to the ordering station in the 
drive-thru lane. Nothing happened until impatience got the best of me and 1 
decided to lay on my horn for awhile. Something happened. A seemingly 
couteous and friendly female voice took my order. "Pull up to the second win- 
dow" she said. I proceeded to the second window. When I got there, the win- 
dow was open and her hand was outstreached. "Three thirty five please" she 
said. I paid my bill promptly. "Thank you, please pull over there and we'll br- 
ing your order out to you" she said. 

Perplexed by this situation, I nodded my head and headed in the direction 
pointed out to me. They must have known I was coming. There was a sign 
which read 'Drive-thru Parking Only'. It seemed obvious to me that the sign 
was in error. It should have read 'Drive-in Parking Only'. Nothing happened. 
Nothing happened until I went inside and gave the seemingly courteous and 
friendly female voice a look that would scare a Dauberman Pinscher. Something 
happened. I received my order promptly and I was inspired to write my first 
law: Waste my time, pay a fine. The fine would be computed with the following 
formula: Wasted time x current minimum wage ' cost of merchandise. 

As a footnote, don't be fooled by the new double window format at 
McDonalds where they take your money at the first and (hopefully) thru more 
effiecient. This was set up to take your money and distance you from it even 
faster. Should you decide twenty minutes is too long to wait for a quarter- 
pounder and you would rather go down the street to Wendy's, you now have to 
back over two cars to get your money. 



Law Two: Give me a number, pay face value. 



Last December I did some Christmas shopping at the local department 
store. Being the fine community-oriented busmess they are, they ofi'ered to gift- 
wrap my presents for free. Unfortunately, they offered to giftwrap everyone 
else's presents for free also. We all took them up on the offer. I proceeded to 
the giftwrap department where a sign told me to take a plastic number. Being an 
orderly person, I did just so. I then heard the following conversation: 

Clerk: What kind of paper would you Uke? 

Customer: That green kind over there. 

Clerk: What kind of ribbon would you Uke? 

Customer: One of these red ones. 

Clerk: What do you think of this ribbon over here? 

Customer: I, ahhh... 

Oerk: I talked some lady into letting me put this on the same kind of 
paper you want. It's different, but I think it's a real interestmg combination. 
Here, let me hold it up, can you see this? 

Customer: Ahhh, I'll just... 

Qerk: Or this is even weirder, have you ever seen these color combina- 
tions before. ..etc... 

I still have that number, and with my new law, it could be worth something. 
Law Two: Give me a number, pay face value. No formula needed for this one. 
If I have number sixty-four, my whole day is shot, and you pay me sixty-four 
dollars. 



Law Three: Drive Slow, Hand Over Dough 



I think you can tell a lot about a person by the way he or she drives. This is 
a totally unexplored area in pyscho-anyalization. For instance, I think that a 
person who can't seem to stay in the confines of his lane, also has trouble fin- 
ding a direction in his life. The person that speeds up to a red light is going 
nowhere fast and so on. 

This can make for intesting driving, but when I'm in a hurry to get to 
school in the morning, I always seem to come across the person that Ukes to 
hold up progress. The person invariably has a bumper sticker with the call let- 
ters of his local country and western radio station planted on the rear of his car. 
Usually there are other stickers on his car such as "Let me tell you about my 
grandchildren" (I'd never fall for that time wasters trick). 

Many times the person even wears a hat to further shield him from pro- 
gress. My third and final law should lake care of this: Number of MPH's under 
the speed limit x wasted time x number of absurd bumper stickers, converted to 
dollars. If the law works the way it is designed to, pretty soon they will be too 
poor to drive. 

I think its high time that people speak out about these time wasting pro- 
blems, but don't tell me; I'm busy right now. Oh, by the way, the next time I 
win a McDonald's gift certificate, it's yours for the asking. 



Mike Hoover, computer science student from Selinsgrove. 



8dW.A.CC HOnZONSDMoidir. Not. 4, 1N5 



Hope Incased In Ashes 

The dilapidated, timeworm brownstone was a menacing 
giant compared to the scattered arrangement of houses on Edwin 
Street. Condemned six months earlier, It stiil lingered and surviv- 
ed, providing a dangerous shelter for Its occupant, a scraggly, 
calico, alley cat. 

There were fourteen, steep, splintered, wooden stairs that 
creaked and groaned under the slightest pressure, the tarnished 
handrail lending no support If a rotting step should suddenly 
decide to collapse. The door-which was nothing more than a tat- 
tered, motheaten bianket-hoared clouds of ash and soot, which 
burst into showers of drizzling dust with each gust of wind. 

At night, the moon would shed a haunting glow on the 
decaying building. Shards of broken glass and litter glistened like 
blades of knives; crumpled paper rolled on slow, lazy breezes, 
resembling tumbleweed in a ghost town. The morning sun even- 
tually transformed the nightly apparitions into the remnants that 
they actually were: shattered glass, empty cans and bottles, 
discarded trash; but the feeling of unfriendliness persisted. 

Even the clumps of stringy, tangled cobwebs had life. 
Dangling from the rusting waterspout, attached to the corners of 
the cracked, smudged windows, the webs clung desperatly to 
the Intimidating structure like parasites. Often the spidery balls of 
twine disengaged themselves from their unkempt dwelling, 
floated through the air and fastened their tentacles on an un- 
suspting on an unsuspecting passer-by. 

There was an assiduous odor, which caused the occupants 
of Edwin Street to plug their noses when passing. A sour, musky 
smell, it entered the nostrils and hypnotised its victims, making 
the scent recur each time the brownstone crossed their mind. 
The pungent odor scaled the lifeless ivy, slid expertly down the 
corroded banister and rolled in the scant patches of yellowing 
grass. 

Last week, after a drenching rainstorm subsided, four, 
muscular, construction workers visited the deteriorated building. 
With the assistance of a wrecking bail, they ended the life of the 
ancient, withered giant. As the dust settled over the rubble, a 
solitary rose-petais tainted but still red-peaked over the boulders 
and shafts of dampened wood, and shed a tear of dew. 




Lisa Rae Williams 



CAN THIS BE LIFE 



To know love, 

yet feel and understand pain. 
To travel to the edge of your minds resources, 

and still remain sane. 



Experiencing moods, 

that are hard to comprehend. 
To live your life, in peace and fulfillment, 

until you reach the end. 



Life is a tool, in the hands of, 

both wise men and fools. 
Playing a game, so hard to understand, 

with all kinds of stupid rules. 



The worst rule being 

no matter how hard you try, 
you never really win. 
Because for every trouble to overcome, 

there's ano^er one to begin. 



Yet we live on, 

enjoying each night and day. 
While knowing in our hearts, 

it's the only way. 



Can this be life, 

I ask you my friend? 
Yes we all say, 

over and over again! 

Lyk A. Wi«Kr 



mmmmmi'^ .»s«ws«wi»Mw»«aw»!» 



SPOTUGHTaMoadiT, Not. 4, insoS 



SPOTLIGHT//i^.„ 

Dr. Miles Williams 



a 



students are our most 
effective advocates...'' 




DR. WILLIAMS ISPOTUCHT photo by URoy S. Whitmire Jr.j 



Dr. Miles Williams, dean of employee and community relations, is a former 
native of central Florida. He moved to this area Approximately four years ago. 
Although he was bom and raised just below Disneyworld, Dr. Williams claims 
Idaho as his real home. 

After attending Florida State University at Tallahasee, Dr. Williams moved 
to Idaho, where he designed and built his own home. According to Dr. 
Williams, the house was constructed with wide-board pine and glass - a concept 
he said allows him to "bring the outdoors in." He added that the staircase is 
actually a huge log in which he had stairs carved. For the time being, he said, he 
leases the hose on a long-term basis, and would like to retire there someday. 

Dr. Williams is a fan of the "great outdoors" and spends his free time 
fishing, swimming, and particularly, hunting. He stated, "I enjoy non- 
competitive outdoor activities. In hunting, I enjoy the pursuit; I don't really en- 
joy the kill. In fact, I passed up two catches of deer this season." 

Dr. Williams plays the banjo, and perfers mountain music and bluegrass. 
He also studied voice for a number of years, and soloed for the Orlando Sym- 
phony. 

Dr. Williams received three degrees from FSU: a Bachelor's degree in 
English, a Master's degree in Communications, and a Doctorate in Higher 
Education Administration. 

After graduating, he was employed by the Florida State Department of 
Education and Certification. He also taught several years of high school jour- 
nalism, English, and speech. 

As dean of employee and community relations. Dr. Williams is responsible 
for College public relations. 

"This is the best comprehensive community college in the northeast. ..in- 
stitutional marketing is our primary objective this year. Of course, students are 
or most effective advocates. .they will have a part of the action." 

Dr. Williams' wife, Joie, is a former native of California. She is currently 
working toward her master's degree at the Pennsylvania State University. The 
couple has no children. 

By Kithy L. Cobb 
Of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 



Fice... complimenti of 
the Bookstore (LRC): Show os 
yonr Fall '85 ID card and 
receive an imprinled pass case 
with key ring. 



The CoUege Bookstore reminds all 
students that it will not accept any more 
charges to grants. Grant charges ended 
Friday, Oct. 23. 



PBL to assist in Noyember fund raiser 

Phi Beta Lambda will assist the Lycoming Lung and Health Association 
during November with the "put one on for Utile lungs" fund raiser at the 
Lycoming Mall, Muncy, according to Paul W. Goldfeder, assistant professor of 
business and PBL advisor. 

Persons making contributions are entitled to trim-the-tree with snowmen. 
All proceeds will benefit child's asthma research. 

"Curiosity Shoppe" Christmas orders are expected to arrive this week. 
Items can be picked up in Room 3, lower level, Academic Center. 

The next PBL meeting will be held tomorrow at 3:30 p.m.. Room 329, 
Academic Center. 



BARRY'S 

B 



Open 6 a.m. to midnighl 

Monday thru Friday 

Open Saturday I p.m. to 3 a.m. 




Barry says: We won't cook a burger before its Ume. \ 

Brooklyn Style Eatery ^ 

\ 

A UNIQUE Eating Experience '/ 
Best breakfast in town »/ 
•Arcade and Pool Table 
Daily Specials 



234 Park St. Just across from 
tlie Dew east parking lot 



\ 



4aSPOrLIGHTDMondiy, Not. 4. 1985 




THE FOOD AND HOSPITALITY CLASS presenied 
Dr. Robtrt L. Breader, College president, with a belated birthday cake Oct. 
21, upon his return from an elk hDHtfog Mp in Colorado. Among those sharing 
the cake are, from left, Dr. Breader, Greg S. Lange,SGA president and ac- 
connling student from Lock Haven and Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. The gathering was held at Le Jeune Chef. 

ISPOTLICHT pholo by LeRoy S. Whilmire Jr.j 



Olio's 

College 
Corner 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next lo Academic Center) 

Phone 322-1321 

HOURS • Mon. thru Thurs. 

7:30 a.m. lo 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Open for Breakfast 

ir i^ if 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 

Four winners 
every week 

• • • 

Your favorite Subs and 

Burgers the way you like 'em 

Come on over and gel 
somelhin' good lo eal! 



IIIBm«Hlflini 



KB 



Mum Sale 




Assorted Colors 

Cut Mums $2.00 

Potted Mums $2.50 

Nov. 4th thru 15th 

in the Bookstore 

Sponsored by 

the 
Floriculture 
Class 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For Week of Monday, Nov. 4 through Sunday, Nov.lO 

MEETINGS 

Gamma Epsilon Tau (GET)...DOon, tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. S, Room 
8107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Multi-Cultural Society. ..3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 5, Room 
153, Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous...? to 8 p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 6, Room BI07, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda.. .3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Nov 5, Room 329, Academic 
Center. 

Service and Operation of Heavy Equipment. ..6 p.m. tonight, Room 204, 
Academic Center. 

Student Government Association. ..executive Coirmiittee, tomorrow, Tues- 
day and Friday at 4 p.m.. Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Action Committee (S.A.C.), 4 p.m. today. Room A138, Student 
Government Office. 

SPECIAL ACTIVmES 

Family Lecture Series. .."The Adolescent," 7 to 10 p.m., tomorrow, Tues- 
day, Nov. 5, YWCA, 815 W. Fourth St.; must register today; phone 322-4737. 
Cost is $3 per person or $5 per couple. 

New York City Bus Trips... December 7 and 14. flus leaves the Lifelong 
Education Center parking lot at 6 a.m. to St. Patrick's Cathedral and leaves the 
Cathedral at 9 p.m. Price is S18 for College students, staff, faculty and alumni, 
and $20 for the general pubUc. 

REMINDERS 

Reading Outlets Bus Trip. ..Deadline to register is Wednesday, Nov. 6. 
Scheduled for Nov. 16, the bus leaves the Lifelong Education Center parking lot 
at 6:30 a.m., leaves Reading at 7 p.m. Price is $10 for College students, faculty, 
staff and alumni, and $12 for the general public. Reservations may be made at 
the Rec Center, Ext. 763, or 327-4763. 

pH ■■ I VALUABLE COUPONIhm ■■ 

rFREE PlIIAr 

I Buy any size Uttle Caesars 

■ Original round pizza at regular 
price, get the identical pizza 
■ FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-g«00 



W.A.C.C. itndcnU u?e 
addMoul 10% only with 
itadenl I.D. nd tUi ad. 

One coupon per customer. CajTy out only. At participating locations, m 



eeoooo 

Snaeks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 

ALWAYS OPEN - 




ALL NIGHT, 
HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



BENSON 



Offl mini, ^ 
fim market 




Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



Wacc 



^^CHives 



POTLIGHT 

Monday, Nov. 11, 1985 • Vol. 21, No. II* 8 Pages WiUiamsport Area Community College • WilUamsporl, Pa. 17701 




EDUCATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES from Taipei, Taiwan, the People's 
Republic of China, toured the College's high tech areas on the main campus last 
Tuesday. Here members of the group are shown in the computer science 

laboratory. ISPOTUGHT photo by URoy S. WhUmire Jr.] 



The AIDS Crisis: 
A public concern 



"An Early Frost", an NBC Television Network drama about a young 
lawyer with AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), airs tonight on 
WERE Channel 28. 

The drama focuses on one family forced to face the reality of AIDS. In an 
emotionally compeUing way, this television movie takes AIDS out of the realm 
of abstraction and gives its victim a name and a family. As they react to the 
realization that their loved one may be cut down by an "early frost", AIDS, the 
dread disease, becomes a very personal tragedy. 

The mysterious appearance of a new, transmissible, and usually fatal 
disease has created an epidemic of fear in the country. Consumed by AIDS anx- 
iety, many people have overlooked the human face of AIDS and its impact upon 
individuals. 

Mrs. Janet Quermit, student health services nurse, urges everyone to watch 
this movie. Anyone who wants more information on the disease should contact 
her in Room 104 in the gymnasium. 



On-campus vandalism concern 
Expressed by Dr. Martin 



Concern over recent on<ampus 
vandalism has been expressed by Dr. 
William J. Martin, dean of student ser- 
vices. 

Dr. Martin noted that there have 
been three instances of vandalism this 
semester, including a fire in the men's 
locker room, and damage during two 
separate incidents to a men's restroom 
in the Lifelong Education Center. He 
said both occurred during dances spon- 
sored by student organizations, despite 
chaperoning. 

"I don't think students realize that 
the money which pays for vandalism 



damages comes out of an account made 
up of a percentage of the activity fees 
students pay each semester, " Dr. Mar- 
tin stated. 

Mrs. Jo Ann R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities, remarked 
that members of the Student Govern- 
ment Association discussed the issue at 
a recent SGA meeting, and felt "the 
damages were childish, and a waste." 

Dr. Martin urged anyone with in- 
formation pertaining to the damage or 
anyone who sees vandalism being com- 
mitted to get in touch with College 
authorities as soon as possible. 



Partnerships '85held 

The College hosted approximately 150 area businessmen on Thursday, Oct. 
31, for Partnerships '85. 

According to Sandra L. Rosenberger, coordinator of the Center for 
Business and Industrial Advancement, the purpose of the event was to promote 
regional networking of business, industry, government and education. Those 
who participated were provided with an opportunity to develope mutually pro- 
fitable relationships with other organizations, and to preview the latest in 
technological training. 

Ms. Rosenberger stated, "I think we achieved our goal, which was to get 
community group and business leaders to the College to show them what the 
College offers as far as programs and training." 

Michael G. Bolton, executive director of the North East Tier Advanced 
Technology Center of the Ben Franklin Partnership Program, and assistant to 
the president of Lehigh University, was keynote speaker for the event. 

In his address, Bolton blamed employment and industrial difficulties on the 
lack of U.S. competitiveness, the lack of skilled people, and the inability of skill- 
ed people to locate positions in their fields. 

He said that working toward a solution, the Ben Franklin Partnership Pro- 
gram offers educational/technological transfer and training programs, short 
courses and seminars, and hands-on experience. Bolton added that the program 
recognizes the importance of small business;" . . .approximately 70 percent of new 
jobs come from this secure... small businesses are often the future growth of in- 
dustry." 

According to Bolton, over $100 million has been poured into the program: 
"It is the largest program of its kind in this country," 

Following Bolton's presentation, participants toured the campus, focusing 
on laboratory areas such as the metrology lab, machine tool technology labs, 
microcomputer labs, construction technologies, labs, and programmable logic 
labs, among others. 

According to Ms. Rosenberger, the event concluded with a reception in the 
Susquehanna Room, featuring a buffet prepared by Food and Hospitality 
students. 

Also participating in the event were several area resource organizations, in- 
cluding the Small Business Administration, Pennsylvania Technical Assistance 
Program, Pennsylvania Department of Commerce, Mid-Atlantic Trade Adjust- 
ment Assistance Center, and the Service Corps of Retired Executives. 
Development with assistance from the following: West Branch Manufacturer's 
Association, Williamsport/Lycoming Chamber of Conmierce, North Tier Ad- 
vanced Technology Center at Lehigh University, North Central Advanced 
Technology Center at Pennsylvania State University, Small Business Develop- 
ment Center at Bucknell University, WiUiamsport Area Management Club, and 
the College Foundation. 

The Event was funded by a grant ft-om the Pennsylvania Ben Franklin Part- 
nership Program through the North East Tier Advanced Technology Center at 
Lehigh University. 

Partnerships '85 was sponsored by the Center for Business and industrial 
Development, and was coordinated by Ms. Rosenberger. 

Other sponsors were the West Branch Manufacturer's Association, 
Wilhamsport/Lycoming Chamber of Commerce, North East Tier, Advanced 
Technology Center at Lehigh University, North Central Advanced Technology 
Center at Pennsylvania State University, Small Business Development Center at 
Bucknell University, WiUiamsport Area Management Club, and the CoUege 
Foundation. 

Food and money collection slated 

"Feed-A-Fr!end,"a program to fight hunger throughout Northeastern and 
Central Pennsylvania, is underway now through Nov. 24. 

Sponsored by WNEP-TV in Avoca, the program wiU coordinate canned 
food and money donations to feed area needy famUies. 

Interested persons should contact the CoUege Rec Center, Ext. 763. 



laSPOTUGHTOMaiKU;. Nov.ll, IMS 

Whaddya' say...? 

The Question: Are you aware the College 
Board of Trustees recently approved a revised budget 
that results in cuts and revisions, particularly an in- 
crease of $200 to $500 yearly in student tuition costs? 
What is your reaction to this decision and how will 
you handle the extra expense? 

Photos and Interviews by Donna L. Trimble. 




Di-Anne Hess, individual 
studies student from 
Williamsport, "Wtiy can't the 
College make more of an effort 
to reduce expenses, for in- 
stance, the lobby light being 
turned off, who needs it on dur- 
ing the day? I'll apply for more 
financial aid probably." 



Thomas P. fwlcMahon, com- 
puter science student from 
Dushore, "They (the board) 
should wait until the beginning 
of the academic year, not start in 
January." 




Vincent M. Kimsa 
business administration student 
from Bloomsburg, "Education 
shouldn't cost so much. I may 
transfer." 



Melinda S. Welshans, 
general studies student from 
Jersey Shore, "The increase is 
outrageous. I'll use grants and 
financial aid. 



SPOTLIOHT 
Monday, Nov. tl.ltas ■ Vol. 21, No. 11 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday morning ol the academic year, ex- 
cept tor College vacations, by joumallsm and other Interested students o( The 
Williamsport Area Community College 

Ottice Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 W Third St , Williamsport, Pa. 
17701 Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 221 



THE STAFF 

Wanna F Brown, Managing Editor 
Sandra L Musgrave. Editorial Page Editor 
LeRoy S Whitmire Jr , Photography Editor 
Kathy L Cobb. Administrative AMairs Editor 
Kelly S Herroid. Student Atlairs Reporter 
Cynthia E A Hartrantt. Advertising Director 

Lyie A Wagner, Pioduction Coordinator 

Timothy F Neidig. PM7 Darkroom Technician 

Iwtichael A. Dye. Sfaff Artist 

REPOHTEHS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Cathenne A Hannon. Di-Anne 1. Hess. Susan R Kallansrud, JoelJ, Mader. Lisa E 
Secrist. Donna L Trimble 

Acting adviser: James D. Carpenter 



Peer Tutoring Conference 
Held at Bucknell University 

Recently, four Williamsport Area Community College 
English tutors Virginia Gatcheff, Beverly Derrick, Patricia Hin- 
shaw. and I accompanied by the Tutoring Center Coordinator, 
Diana Kuhns, had the honor of attending the second annual con- 
ference on Peer Tutoring in Writing held at Bucknell University. 
The proximity of the conference enabled us to attend the 
weekend-long event, and we were excited by the opportunity to 
exchange information with tutors from over fifty other schools. 

Being a new experience for us, we had next to no idea of 
what to expect, but we were confident that, no matter what, we 
would come away richer in knowledge and more enlightened in 
our roles as tutors. 

The conference structure included three lectures on different 
issues concerning peer tutoring, immediately followed by small 
group discussions and various workshops which dealt with 
topics vital to today's peer tutoring. 

"We hope that this conference will reveal both the range of 
peer tutoring programs and their common ground," was a plea- 
sant thought delivered by Bucknell University in the conference 
schedule pamphlet. The pamphlet contained other well- 
meaning, amicably phrased sentences, but this one seemed to 
sum up the main objectives of the conference and, using this as a 
criterion, it can be said the conference was at least half suc- 
cessful. 

Unfortunately, most of the time, the range of the tutoring pro- 
grams was emphasized and the "common ground" became par- 
tially buried beneath an atmosphere of, for lack of a better word, 
competition. Certain elitist schools had come to the conference 
feeling that they had to present their tutoring programs as "state- 
of-the-art" and that the programs of other schools were deficient 
by comparison. The academic stratification was apparent, and 
the resulting communication gap shouldn't have been a surprise. 

Tutors from the prestigious schools of Brown University and 
Swarthmore College placed themselves together in a tutoring 
stratum of their own and throughout most of the conference were 
unwilling to descend from their self-styled pedestals to associate 
with the mere mortals of the tutoring world. 

Brown and Swarthmore were obviously more secure in 
themselves and both easily dominated the conference. Why 
shouldn't they? Each had tutoring delegations three to four times 
the average size, giving each the advantage of overrepresenta- 
tion in both the small group discussions and the workshops 
which were comprised, usually, of no more than twenty people to 
better facilitate an exchange of ideas and experiences. 

Of course, as the conference proceeded, barriers broke 
down (as much as they possible could in three days), and we 
became more comfortable in our environment of discussion. The 
conversation became less formal and more relaxed, and we 
found ourselves able to relate to tutors from other socio- 
economic backgrounds and discovered we all had more 
similarities than differences in our roles as tutors. 

We reached a consensus that, generally speaking, the con- 
ference was a success. We had been exposed to new view- 
points and tutorial methods, some of which we could apply to our 
own situation. Our most outstanding realization, and one shared 
by almost everyone at the conference, including Brown and 
Swarthmore, was that each tutoring program was designed to 
meet the needs of its particular institution. 

Donald E. Mumford, General Studies student from Jersey 
Shore. 

Death Wish 3 blood thirsty 



by Sandra L. Musgrave 

It you like blood and violence. 
Death Wish 3 is the movie for you. 

Charles Bronson portrays a 
vigilante and plays the role well. He re- 
mains his usual self throughout the 
movie. 

The hero arrives in New York City 
only to be arresed by the police for a 
murder he did not commit. The chief ot 
police then asks him to work under 
cover for the police to clean up a gang 
in the New York slums. 

Hard to believe, in a movie with so 



Of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 

much killing, there is a witty side. 

The movie has a plot much the 
same as an old-fashioned western. 
The hero hunts his outlaws, killing 
them off one by one. The plot works 
up to a final blood-thirsty shoot-out in 
the streets with murder, accidents, and 
fire. Our vigilante, his neighboring 
apartment dwellers, and the police 
light against the street gang. Of course, 
the ringleader of the gang is the 
vigelante's to kill, which he succeeds in 
doing for the climax ol the movie. 



SPOTLIGHTaMondiy, Nov.ll, 19SSa3 



Welcome day success; 2,000 turn out 



By Kathy L. Cobb 
Of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Within the last year, the College 
has instituted new methods to retain 
students. Dr. William J. Martin, dean 
of student services, states, "I believe we 
begin to retain students from the time 

College receives 
award of $1,000 

Williamspbrt Area Community 
College has received a John Reese 
Award of $1 ,000 as a part of Pepsi-Cola 
U.S.A.'s Community Grant Program. 
Announcement of the award was made 
by Frederick T. Gilmour, executive 
director of the College Foundation. 

Gilmour stated that the program 
was developed to recognize and support 
the pubhc service initiatives of Pepsi- 
Cola bottlers. 

He noted that the John Reese 
Awards were developed by Pepsi, 
U.S.A. early this year in memory of 
Reese, a Pennsylvania Pepsi bottler of 
twenty-six years. Reese was killed in a 
plane crash last year. He was well- 
known for civic leadership involving 
local charities, the arts, civic affairs, 
educational programs and assistance 
programs for the disadvantaged. 

According to Richard H. Confaii, 
president of the local Pepsi-Cola Bottl- 
ing Company, Pepsi bottlere across the 
United States submitted various institu- 
tions that would qualify to receive the 
grants. 

He stated that while his company 
submitted seven local organizations for 
approval, be was very pleased that as 
many as four were chosen to receive the 
awards. 

Besides the CoUege, also receiving 
the grants are the Lycommg United 
Way, the Williamsport Young Mens' 
Christian Association, and the 
Williamsport Hospital. 



they first inquire about the College." 

Therefore, the College has begun to 
place an emphasis on making appUca- 
tion, placement, and scheduling easier 
for new students, he says. 
'One-stop shopping' 
.In the past, the CoUege mailed 
schedules to newly-accepted students 
who were then responsible for coming to 
the College to take care of any 
academic-related business before the 
start of the semester. Since then, the 
Advisement and Career Services Center 
initiated what Dr. Martin calls "one- 
stop shopping". 

Now, students are scheduled for an 
orientation-type day, usually held on a 
Saturday, when they can come in for 
placement testing, scoring of those tests, 
scheduUng, identification photographs, 
and meetings with respective division 
personnel. 

Accordmg to Dr. Martin, students 
and their famihes are also given an op- 
portunity to investigate housing via a 
telephone bank set up at the College. 

"The idea," Dr. Martin says, "is 
to help students get squared away with 
respect to the College all m one day." 
This concept, he says, is "super- 
convenient". 
Many volanleered 

Dr. Martin said he believes this 
system is highly successful because "we 
have captured the highest market share 
of applicants that we've ever been able 
to take... I thmk we can feel very good 
about that." 

He states that many College 
employees volunteered their time to help 
with testing days. He says, "We should 
pay tribute to those people who donated 
their time to this project. There is a lot 
of satisfaction in helpmg new students 
get squared away." 

Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director 
of the Advisement and Career Services 
Center, comments, "All the evaluations 
indicate that testmg/scheduling days are 
a positive experience for people and 



Students ineligible for ROTC 

According to Lawrence W. Emery, director of advisement and career ser- 
vices. College students are ineUgible to participate in the ROTC program, at the 
Bucknell University, Lewisburg. 

Emery stated that the reason is the College has no "formal Unkage" to a 
four-year school which offers ROTC, and there are no guarantees that students 
who wish to be a part of ROTC will transfer to a four-year school. 

He added that students who are working toward a four-year degree, and 
would Uke to participate in ROTC have a number of options. Any student who 
is planning to transfer to Bucknell University after one year, and has no military 
experience, can take Mihtary Science I and II concurrently during his/her 
sophomore year. That student will then be in phase with the other students 
enrolled in ROTC. 

Any student who plans to transfer after completing two years at the College, 
and has no prior military experience, will still be eUgible to take ROTC through 
the Two Year Program. The student must attend the six-week Basic Camp dur- 
ing the summer between sophomore and junior years. 

Finally, he said that a student who plans to transfer, and who had prior 
mihtary experience, either as active duty enhsted or has completed Basic Camp 
through the National Guard or Reserves, will be able to enroll in the Advanced 
Course. 

Any questions may be directed to Emery, by callmg extension 246, or by 
visiting his ofBce in the Career Advisement and Placement Center, Room 157, 
Learning Resource Center. 



should be continued. If there are any 
negative aspects, I would have to say 
that in the recent past, parents have 
been discouraged by housing condi- 
tions. However, dependent upon our 
enrolhnent situation, I believe we might 
see better housmg in the future." 

'One-day concept... ncelleni idea' 

He continues, "Another negative 
aspect is that in August, scheduUng is 
more difficult, due to the more 
desireable sections already being filled. 
Often times, the only open slots are 
evening classes. In all, though, this one- 
day concept is an excellent, convenient, 
worthwhile idea." 

Welcome Day - held this year for 
the first time (on Sunday, Aug. 25) - is 
another new concept designed to retain 
students by making them feel comfor- 
table in their new atmosphere, he says. 

During Welcome Day, new and 
returning students were given an oppor- 
tunity to obtain ID cards, to buy tex- 
tbooks, to locate classrooms, and to 
tour the campus. A picnic-style lunch 
was provided by the College for those 
students and their famihes who attend- 
ed. 

'Gold mine of an idea' 

Although the College only expected 
about 700 people to participate in 
Welcome Day, approximately 2,000 at- 
tended. Dr. Martin comments, "We 
were not really prepared for that many 
people, so we learned a great deal from 
the experience. We will be better 
prepared in the future. I thmk we struck 
a gold mine of an idea and I think we 
can expect to have Welcome Day every 
year prior to the beginning of the FaU 
term." 

Emery states, "I think Welcome 
Day was a success, judging by the sheer 
number of students who participated... 
We never anticipated its popularity, but 
I thmk we can look forward to future 
Welcome Days ~ probably with more 
student involvement. For instance, stu- 



dent organizations will be given an op- 
portunity to present themselves and 
recruit more interest for their clubs." 



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JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
,^ PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

Hoan: Mon.-Sil. II i.m. lo 9 p.m. CloKd SoDdi; 

Monday Regular Sub Whole $1.60 

Tuesday Meatball Whole $1.75 

Wednesday Turkey Whole $1.40 

DAILY SPECIALS Thursday Ham Whole $1.80 

Friday Tuna Whole $1,70 

Saturday Cheese Steak Whole $2.50 

•Subs Ail Handmade to Order 
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•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

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4aSPOTLIGHTaMoD<lir. Not.U. IMS 

PBL attends conference 



Nine Phi Beta Lambda members 
from Ihe College attended the 1985 
Eastern Region Fall Leadership Con- 
ference in Baltimore, Maryland, Nov. 
1-3, along with Paul W. Goldfeder, 
associate professor of business at the 
College and PBL's advisor. 

Bus added 
ForN.Y.C. trip 

Because if the huge waiting list, a 
second bus has been added to Ihe New 
York trip, planned for Saturday, Dec. 
7. Busses leave the Lifelong Education 
Center parking lot at 6 a.m. to St. 
Patrick's Cathedral and leave at 9 p.m. 

Payment deadline ia Wednesday, 
Nov. 27. Price is $18 for College 
students, staff, faculty and alumni, and 
$20 for the general public. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordiator of College ac- 
tivities, Ihe trip is on a lirst<ome first- 
served basis. The only way to be 
guaranteed a seat is to pay. 

Assistant Professor Hayes 
Attends Business Seminar 

Mrs. Ruby K. Hayes, College assis- 
tant professor of busines and computer, 
attended a seminar, entitled Business 
Education: A Capital Investment, in 
Washington, D.C., Oct. 11-12. 

One of the highlights of her trip 
was a tour of the Washington Post 
newspaper. Mrs. Hayes noted she was 
impressed with the various uses of com- 
puters by the writers. 

Holiday contest 
coming soon 

Plans are being made for the Holi- 
day Cheer Contest, an organized 
decorating contest open to students, 
faculty and organizations at the College. 

Anyone interested in sponsoring or 
reserving an area should contact Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities, at Ext. 269. 



Among the many seminars the 
group attended was "The Politics of 
Education, "presented by Dr. Edward 
D. Miller, chief executive officer of 
Future Business Leaders of America-Phi 
Beta Lambda, who was the key speaker. 

Eleven-hundred students from 56 
colleges attended the conference, accor- 
ding to Goldfeder. 

In addition to attending seminars, 
the students enjoyed a dance held in 
their honor at the Baltimore Plaza 
Hotel, visited the Aquarium and Inner 
Harbor, he said. 

With the holidays rapidly ap- 
proaching, the organization has become 
involved in the WNEP-TV "Feed a 
Friend, "project. 

Goldfeder emphasized the impor- 
tance of Phi Beta Lambda's involve- 
ment in service to the community and 
the College, especially to those persons 
who are fortunate than many. 

In the midst of PBL's activities, the 
organization is sponsoring a dance Nov. 
20 from 9 p.m. to midnight in the Sus- 
quehanna Room of the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. A disc jockey from a local 
radio station will provide the entertain- 
ment. 

Phi Beta Lambda's next meeting 
will be held tomorrow at 3:30 p.m.. 
Room 329, Academic Center. 

No lunches served 

Le Jeune Chef, the student- 
operated restaurant will not be serving 
lunches until next semester, according 
to Miss Judith M. Patschke, instructor 
of Quanity Foods Production and Ser- 
vice. 

New high school juniors will be 
entering the program today. The secon- 
dary students need to be trained before 
re-opening the restaurant. 



Get MORE out of being single. Join 
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BflBflflTBOBBn 
1 Hour Photo Lab, Inc. 



irtAiiiirHiifitniimlwiW.hwf^.tTTHV.twTTt.TrTTfj.VTTTTJ.TTjw^.VrTwI.lwiYi 



Basin Street Shopping Center 
323-7844 

1 hour or same day service od all color in-lab processing 
(11t«, 126, 135, or disc nim). 
10 percent discount to all WACC students and faculty with valid ID. on 
all In-lab color processing services. 

(Discounl ciol valid wilh other promotions or discounts) 

SPECIAL OFFER FROM KODAK until Nov. 20. 
$3.00 off personal posters from your favorite 3Smm 

B^l^ll color photo, slide or negative. 
^^1 Originally $17.95 >^ 



Now 



$14.95 





THE TECHNICAL TRADE building was one of the 
areas toured during partnership'85. In the picture is 
Richard R. Peck, machine tool technology student 
from Champion and Jay R. Ferringer, machine tool 
technology student from New Bethlehem. (See related 

story page 1). ISPOTUGHT phow by URoy S. WhUmUe Jr.l 




You haven't had a Hoagie 
until you've had a 

^^OBY Limited Area • Minimum Order $4.00 



CoEd volleyball 
schedule for week 

Monday, Nov. 11 

Bums vs. WACC Staff and 
Euphoria vs. Straub Greenies play at 7 
p.m. 

MCB vs. Net Busters nd RAM vs. 
Stroh's Slammers play at 8:15 p.m. 

Wednesday, Nov. 13 

WACC Staff vs. RAM and 
Euphoria vs. MCB at 7 p.m. 

RAM vs. Bums and MCB vs. 
Straub Greenies at 8:15 p.m. 

Mens Volleyball 

Division A 

schedule 

Tuesday, Nov. 12 

Purple Renobs vs. Samuri at 7 
p.m. on court one; Scumbuzzards vs. 
Black Sheep at 7 p.m. on court four; 
Black Sheep vs. Samuri at 8 p.m. on 
court one; Six Packers vs. Black Sheep 
at 8 p.m.; Samuri vs. Beans Bomers at 
9 p.m. on court four. 

Wednesday, Nov. 13 

Samuri vs. Six Packers at 7 p.m. 
on court one; Black Sheep vs. Beans 
Bomers at 7 p.m. on court four; Scum- 
buzzards vs. Purple Renobs at 8 p.m. 
on court one; Beans Bomers vs. Six 
Packers at 8 p.m. on court four; Beans 
Bomers vs. Scumbuzzards at 9 p.m. on 
court four. 

Thursday, Nov. 14 

Purple Renobs vs. Black Sheep at 7 
p.m. on court one; Samuri vs. Scum- 
buzzards at 7 p.m. on court four; Six 
Packers vs. Black Sheep at 8 p.m. on 
court one; Purple Renobs vs. Samuri at 
8 p.m. on court four. 



Mens Volleyball 
Division B 

Monday, Nov. 11 

The Hooters vs. The Jetsons at 4 
p.m. on court one; Six Pack vs. 
McGuffs at 4 p.m. on court four; The 
Hooters vs. Mean Machine at 5 p.m. on 
court one; Six Pack vs. The Grim 
Reapers at 5 p.m. on court four; 
McGuffs vs. The Jetsons at 6 p.m. on 
court one; The Grim Reapers vs. The 
Hooters at 6 p.m. on court four. 

Tuesday, Nov. 12 

The Jetsons vs. Six Pack at 4 p.m. 
on court one; Mean Machine vs. 
Photons at 4 p.m. on court four; 
McGuffs vs. Mean Machine at 5 p.m. 
on court one; The Jetsons vs. The Grim 
Reapers at 5 p.m. on court four; The 
Grim Reapers vs. McGuffs at 6 p.m. on 
court one. 

Thursday, Nov. 14 

The Hooters vs. Six Pack at 4 p.m. 
on court one; Photons vs. The Grim 
Reapers at 4 p.m. on court four; The 
Hooters vs. The Jetsons at 5 p.m. on 
court one; Six Pack vs. McGuffs at 5 
p.m. on court four; Photons vs. The 
Hooters at 6 p.m. on court four. 

Adviser sought 

Circle K Club is seeking an adviser. 
The only requirement is that they be 
employed by the College. 

The Circle K, a service organiza- 
tion for college students. The club pro- 
vides an opportunity for leadership that 
is hke the leadership required in the 
business world. Members participate in 
activities for the campus, and the com- 
munity. 

Those interested in becoming the 
club's adviser should contact Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities, Room 108, Bardo 
Gym or phone Ext. 269. 



SPOTLIGHTOMondiy, Not.11, IMSdS 




WWAS ProfUe... Brian J. HiU 

Operations Director, Brian J. Hill, is the moral and industrial backbone of the 
student operated radio station WWAS. 

Under the direction of Chief Engineer, N. CUlford J. Smith, Brian is the 
technical engineer who keeps the quality of 88.1 FM at its peak. 

Wake up to Brian J. Hill on Mondays and Wednesdays at 8 a.m. on univer- 
sal radio 88.1 for the finest in contemporary music and current information. 

Employed locally by WILQ RADIO, Brian is on the airwaves weekends. 
This volunteer fireman from Montgomery has other interests including audio- 
visual electronics and engineering, drums and universal music. 

/SPOTLIGHT pholo by URoy S. Whilmire Jr. I 



Do High Prices Make You Sad? 

>^C^;Vrv^^ Put on a happy face and 
f * \ shop at a great thrift store - 




6aSP01lIGHTDMoBdiy, Not.II, 1185 



SPOTLIGHT/n^... 

Dr. Grant M. Berry, Jr. 



^^..each ...committed 

to do his very best to serve the students..." 



B; Kalhy L. Cobb 
Of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 



"The strongest of the many resources the College has available is an excep- 
tionally diverse and talented faculty and staff," commented Dr. Grant M. Berry, 
Jr., dean of development. 

Adding, "...they bring a level of vitality and enthusiasm to their jobs... each 
in his own way is very committed to do his very best to serve the students of this 
institution." 

Dr. Berry, a Williamsport native, has been employed by the College since 
1969, when he worked as a counselor in the Advisement Center. Since then, he 
has held several positions, including director of financial aid, director of 
resource developement, and his present position. 

Before coming to the College, Dr. Berry was employed as Pennsylvania 
Supervisor of Students sponsored by the Bureau of Colleges. Previously, he 
had been a rehabilitation counselor for the Commonwealth Bureau of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Berry received his education from three institutions: a bachelor's 
degree in mathematics and biology from Lycoming College; a master's degree in 
rehabilitation counsehng from Pennsylvania State University and a doctorate in 
educational research from the University of Connecticut. 

As dean of development. Dr. Berry is responsible for researching and ob- 
taining state and federal grant aid for the College. He stated that since 1976, his 
office has "brought in more than $45 million." 

Among his responsibilities is traveling to locations such as Harrisburg and 
Washington, D.C. to meet with funding agency officials. He has also traveled to 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, Boston, Massachusetts, and Charlotte, North Carolina 
for the same purposes. 

Dr. Berry has varied interests outside his position with the College, in- 
cluding reading, gardening and collecting stamps. He said he enjoys wood work- 
ing as well, and playing the stock market. 

Dr. Berry resides in Hughesville with his family: wife, Francis, and two 
children, Phillip, II, and Ellen, 9. 



SENATOR'S HOURS 

Room A138, LEG 



^:OOA.M. Monday 


Tu..d., 


W«dn«tday 


Thuridiy 


Friday 


B 


FrwthHarttoy 




H..., 




9 


H«ll., 




"-' 


Heisey 


10 earbHfflaey 


*„«., 


HBlMy 






Oatla Bsahm 


P,. 


B..» 


r„» 


Bo^n, 


'2 Koran Cflmpb«li 
graphic ofis 


Bob Rymsia 

L^^'O" graptilc ofls 
Hunainger " 


Campbell 


HySFTuo 

Lange 


Rymsia 


1:00P.M. Dichetson 
John BeflnickAU 
Gladys Hunsirtger ET 


Unge Honsinger 


Hunainger 


^"8" Campbeu 


Baitnlck 


' k . n 


Lange 


Ralph Ktugh diBsel 


CantpbsN 
Uinge 




Sotog Una© 
busihOM marwoomenl 


Lanoe 


Kto* 


Walt* Campbell 
Lange 


Laogo 


'fitinx"! 




Surke Klugh 


Burke 


Wotf 


'am 


B,.K. 


Klt^gh Burke 


**"*' Watts 




macNn* tool 
Uchnoloov 






Watts 




0«o.g.Puzulk>J, 








>:00 «:00 Salurd.y 
A.M. 


iofest technology 
P.z!uBo 


Davsnport 


PiuulD 






10 











Dr. Grant M. Barry, Jr. 




[SPOTLIGHT photo by Donna L. Trimble/. 



Race Across 

the States 

Final Results 



VoUeybaU 



Co-ed 



W 



l.ChetSchumaD 


548'! 






2.JoAnn McFadden 


4250 


# 1 Straub Greenies 


2-0 


3. Richard T. Fisher 


3950 


#2 WACC Staff 


2-0 


4.Dottie Dincher 


3597 


Hi MCB 


1 - 1 


S.Judy Fink 


3592 


# 4 Net Busters 


1-1 


6.JoAnn Fremiotti 


3170 


#5 RAM 


1 - 1 


7.Eric Ranck 


3100 


# 6 Stroh's Slammers 


1 -1 


S.Diana Kuhns 


2829 


# 7 Bums 


0-2 


9.Sundra Lakey 


2729 


# 8 Euphoria 


0-2 


lO.Carmilla Preziosi 


2729 






11. David Cunningham 


2440 


Div. A 




12. Joan Forster 


2430.5 






13. Gladys Hunsinger 


2083 


# 1 Purple Renobs 


4-0 


14.Kenneth Kuhns 


1974 


# 2 Scumbuzzards 


4-0 


15. Linda McFadden 


975 


# 3 Black Sheep 


2-3 


16.Michelle Aunkst 


900 


tt 4 Samuri 


1-3 


n.William Martin 


575 


# 5 Six Packers 


1-3 


IS.LisaSecrist 


275 


H 6 Bean's Bombers 


1-4 


- Tony CiUo 


Idle 






- Judy Phillips 


Idle 






- Donna Pfeufer 


Idle 


Div. B 




FMHSO sale 




# 1 Mean Machine 
tt 2 Six Pack 


4-0 


meets this week 




# 3 The Hooters 

# 4 The Grim Reapers 








It 5 McGuffs 




The Food and Hospitality Manage- 


# 6 Photons 




ment Student Organization is 


selling 


It 7 The Jetsons 


0-4 


thermometers for $8.50 in Room 145B, 







The organization will meet this 
Thursday in Room 107B in LEC at 
noon. 



The Boy Scouts were founded on 
Feb. 8, 1910. The Girl Scouts were 
founded March 12, 1912. 



Susqnehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 

The Susquehanna Room's menu for the week starting today, Monday, Nov. 
II, is presented as furnished by the Susquehanna Room management. 
Daily Breikfut 

Scrambled eggs, 59*; hash browns, 55'; 
home fries, 55"; pancakes, $1.29; French toast, 
99'; wafBes, 99'; sausage, 79' 
Daily Salad Bar 
Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomatoes, 
onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, 
bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple 
butler, jello, potato salad, com relish 
loday, NOT. 11,1985 
Lanch 
Franks and beans with potatoes, $1.99; 
Chicken nuggels, potato and vegetable, $2.39 
Soap 
Chicken rice or chili 
Dinner 
Vienna veal cutlet, potato and vegetable, 
$2.89; Roast pork, gravy, potato and vegetable, 
$2.59 

Sandwiches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, $1.35; 
pizza, $.55; pizza with toppings, $.70; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; Roast Beef hoagie, $1.79; chili 
dog, $.89; grilled cheese. $.79; french fries, $.55 
Tuesday, Nov. 12, 
Lunch 
Rigatoni/meatball, Italian bread, $2.19; 
Pork fried rice, egg roll, $2.39 
Soup 
Ham and bean or Cream of broccoli 
Dinner 
BBQ spare ribs, potato and vegetable, 
$2.89; Golden fried clams, potato and 
vegetable, $2.79 

Sandwiches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie. $1.49; ham BBQ sandwich, $1.25; 
chicken patty, $1.39 

steak and cheese, $l.79;french fries, J. 55. 



Wednesday, Nov. 13, 
Lunch 

Mealloaf, potato and vegetable 
$2.39;Macaroni and cheese, vegetable $2.19; 
Soup 
Beef barley and tomato rice; 

Dinner 
Ravioli and pork cutlet, Italian bread 
$2.89; 
Fried chicken, potato and vegetable $2.49 

Sandwiches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, $1.35; 
pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. hoagie, 
$1.49; fish sandwich, $1.29; com beef on rye 
$1.59; B.L.T.$i.59; fries, 55'. 

Thursday, Nov. 14, Lunch 
Fish and chips, vegetable, $2.39; Chicken 
pot pie, vegtable, $2.39 
Soup 
Cream of mushroom or minestrone. 

Dinner 
Stuffed cabbage, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59; Neptune platter, potato and 
vegetable, $2.95 

Sandwiches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$i.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with lopping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; ham and cheese, $1.59; veal 
parmesan hoagie, $1.79; taco, $.99; french 
fries, $.55. 

Friday, Nov. 15, 

Lunch 

Ham and scalloped potato$2.39; Yankee 

Pot Roast, gravy, potato and vegetable, $2.59. 

Soup 

French onion or manhattan clam chowder 

Sandwiches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; steak and cheese, $1.79; tuna 
salad sandwich $1.59; meatloaf sandwich, 
$1.29; french fnes, $.55. 




Miss Pennsylyania 
U.S.A. underway 

AppHcations are now being ac- 
cepted for the annual Miss Pennsylvania 
U.S.A. Pageant, to be held Feb. 7-8-9, 
1986, in Monroeville's High Rise 
Howard Johnson's Hotel. 

Entrants must be between the ages 
of 17 and 25 by May 1, 1986. Other 
qualifications are: never married, and a 
resident of this state at least six mon- 
ths. Those interested should write to: 
Miss Pennsylvania U.S.A. Pageant Tri- 
State Headquarters, 347 Locust 
Avenue, Washington, Pa. 15301. 
Deadline to apply is Nov.24, 1985 and 
must include a recent snapshot, brief 
biography, and phone number. 

Among the prizes, the winner will 
receive a $1000 cash scholarship. 

The winner will be crowned by the 
current Miss Pennsylvania U.S.A., San- 
dra Ferguson of Clairton. 

The Miss Pennsylvania Pageant is 
an official Miss U.S.A. - Miss Universe 
Contest. 



SPaTLIGHTQMonday, Nov.ll, I985d7 

Freeze walk planned 

The Third Annual Freeze Walk, 
planned for Nov. 16, will form at Bran- 
don Park in Williamsport, at 9:30 a.m., 
to raise money and support for nuclear 
arms reduction. 

Timed in conjunction with the 
Reagan-Gorbachev Summit meeting, the 
walk will cover 6.2 miles. 

For more information or pledge 
sheets, call Chris Markle at 546-8164, 
or Michael Ochs at 326-2513. 



SGA looking for: 


committees and volunteers for activities. 


Fill out form below and bring it to 
the SGA office, Room A138, LEC. 


Name 


Program 


NDHiher tn he reichol 





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Wednesday Meetings 

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Room B107 

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SaSPOTUGHTDModiUy, No?.ll, 1915 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For WMk of Mondiy, Not. 11 through Sondiy, Not.17 

MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega...? p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 13, Room 218, Academic 
Center. 

FHMSO...noon, this Thursday, Nov. 14, Room B107, Lifelong Education 
Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau Fratemity(GET)...noon, tomorrow, Nov. 12, Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous...? to 8 p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 13, Room 
BIO?, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association. ..Executive committee, 4 p.m., tomor- 
row, Nov. 12, Room 8107, Lifelong Education Center. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

Dance.. .8:30 to 11 p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 13, Susquehaima Room, 
admission $1.00; sponsored by Gamma Epsilon Tau. 

Reading Outlets Bus Trip. ..this Saturday, Nov. 16, the bus leaves the 
Lifelong Education Center parking lot at 6:30 a.m., leaves Reading at 7 p.m. 

Stuffed Animals Raffle.. .now through next Monday, Nov. 25, main campus 
and the Earth Science campus. Open to students and general public. Tickets, 50 
cents; sponsored by the Horticulture Technicians Association. For further infor- 
mation, contact Rich Weilminster, Ext. 34 at the Earth Science Division. 

Flowers. ..mum sale, cut mums,$2, potted mums,$2.50, now through this 
Friday, Nov. 15, in College bookstore during their hours; sponsored by the 
Floriculture Class. 

p H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h ■ ■ 

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Buy einy size Little Caesars 
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Cillo's ^ 

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PHONE M. 

322-1321 

1100 W. Third St. 

(Next to Academic Center) 

Come on over and gel 

somelhin' good to eat! 



Your favorite Subs and 
Burgers (he way you lilie 'em 

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HOURS • Mon. thru Thurs. 

7:30 i.m. to 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 a.m. lo 4 p.m. 




EACit O07CC 





Employment 
Opportunities 

K-Mart, Loyal Plaza. ..part-time 
openings for salespersons in Appliance 
Department, cash register operators and 
stock persons. Will work around stu- 
dent's schedule. See Patty Wednesday 
evening or any day except Tuesday at 
store. 

Lemer Shops.. .Reading, has full- 
time assistant manager position. Call 
Ann at (215) 372-7950 for an appoint- 
ment for an interview. Lycoming Mall 
is accepting applications too. 



New books 
in library 

Several new books have arrived in 
the College library, according to Mrs. 
Kate D. Hickey, director of Learning 
Resouces Center. 

The books include How to Profit 
From Your Personal Computer, by 
T.G. Lewis; Automotive Air Condi- 
tioning, by William H. Crouse; 
Typography ^, by a collection of 
authors; and Clamor at the Gates: the 
New American Immigration, by 
Nathan Glazer. 

New paperbacks are the The Wit- 
ches o/Eastwick, by John Updike, and 
The Modigliani Scandal by Ken Follett. 



GAMMA EPSILON TAU 

Will hold a dance in 

The Susquehanna Room 

on Wedneday, Nov. 13, 1985 

8:30 to 11 p.m. 




Door Prize 

Gift Certificate from Listening Booth 

Good for one Album or tape 

$1.00 Admission 

Soda and Candy will be sold. 




OTLIGHT 



Monday, Nof.18. 1985 • Vol. 21, No. 12* 4 Pign 



Willi«msporl Are« Communlly College • WiUiinuport, Pi. 17701 



Students question tuition raise, 
Martin provides some answers 



B; Kalh; L. Cobb 
Of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 

During last week's Student Govern- 
ment Association meeting, held last 
Tuesday, Nov. 12, many students ex- 
pressed concern over the raise in tuition 
costs which resulted from the redistribu- 
tion of the variable stipend funds the 
College was awarded by the state. 

In an attempt to clear up the issue, 
Dr. William J. Martin, dean of student 
services, has provided the following in- 
formation in answer to four questions 
submitted by Gregory S. Lange, SGA 
president: 

/. Why was tuition increased so 
much at one time? 

The tuition costs for the spring 
1986 semester are the same tuition costs 
approved by the Board of Trustees dur- 
ing the summer of 1985. The only dif- 
ference between the costs for Fall'85 
and the costs for Spring '86 is the 
absence of the 20 percent deferral which 
students were credited in Fall'85. "In 
essence, we lowered tuition in the fall, 
and we are returning to the original ap- 
proved tuition in the fall, and we are 
returning to the original approved tui- 
tion for the spring." stated Dr. Martin, 
adding, "The fall '85 deferral is as far 
as we are able to go with the state funds 



that are available to us." 

2. Why is the tuition rate at the 
College so much higher than those of 
other colleges? 

Other schools, particularly state- 
affniiated colleges and universities 
receive at least four times more state 
subsidies per student than do communi- 
ty colleges. The colleges without those 
subsidies, their costs would be much 
higher. 

The community college"system" in 
Pennsylvania is attempting to lobby the 
state for more revenue per student, to 
help offset student costs. However, 
students should join us in this endeavor, 
"Dr. Martin emphasized. "There are 
places where students can put the 
pressure on— school districts, elected of- 
ficials on the stale and local level." 

3. How are slutlent tuition monies 
being spent? 

Student tuition dollars support in- 
struction and services primarily, and in- 
clude other areas such as salaries, m- 
structional supplies, and necessary 
maintenance for the College, according 
to Dr. Martin. 

"Student tuition is never used for 
new equipment, new buildings, renova- 
tions. The money used for those things 



is money we have competed for and 
gotten... money that is specifically 
targeted for those areas. Likewise, we 
can't use this money to off-set student 
tuition, " Dr. Martin said. 

4. Why weren 't students clearly in- 
formed about the tuition for the spring 
'86 semester? 

"The information has been out 
there," Dr. Martm stated. "Several 
issues of the SPOTLIGHT have con- 
tained stories with this information, and 
letters were sent with the Fall 1985 bill- 
ings explaining the deferral." 

Dr. Martin continued, stating, 
"We are working as hard as we can to 
lower coats, and will do anything in our 
power to assist students in meeting 
costs." 

He suggests that students with in- 
dividual problems in meeting costs visit 
the Financial Aid Office, second floor in 
the Academic Center. "My quess is 
that the 20 percent mcreased [caused by 
the absence of the 20 percent deferral] 
will be taken care of by financial aid- 
maybe even more," he stated. 

Dr. Martin emphasized, "Students 
must never think we make a profit from 
tuition costs. The College is a non- 
profit organization; all funds are rolled 
back mto the budget. When funds can 



be used to off-set tuition, they are." 

He added, "The College must offer 
the best possible education at the lowest 
possible price. At the same time, we 
must make improvements. Therefore, 
we must go out and hustle fiinds for 
those improvements so we don't have to 
raise costs so much." 

fEditor's note: Concerned sludenls can 
Jill out Ihe SGA concern/suggestion form on 
page two and bring it to Ihe SGA office, A 1 38, 
LECj. 



Renovation 
Completed 

The renovation of the Technology 
Centers two and three have recently 
been completed. The center houses 
electrical construction technolgy 
students. 

Soon to be under renovation will 
be the Bursar's Office, Financial Aid 
Office and the Earth Science Center, ac- 
cording to Donald E. Peterson, dean of 
general services. 

Restrooras in the Automotive 
Technology Center will also soon be 
under renovation. 



Shared decision-making system close to reality 



In an effort provide an opportunity 
for shared decision-making, the College 
is developing a College -wide Gover- 
nance System, according to Dr. Robert 
G. Bowers, executive assistant for mter- 
nal affairs and coordinator of the pro- 
ject. 

Dr. Bowers stated that the gover- 
nance system will be well-defined and 
structured, addressing the policies and 
procedures concerning the College's 
mission, goals, and objectives, and how 
the College operates on a daily basis. 

He added that the initial step in ad- 
dressing the governance objective is the 
establishment of a steering committee, 
which will review and coordinate the 
process, resulting in the recommenda- 
tion of a proposed governance system. 
Dr. Bowers commented that purpose, 
procedures, membership, organization, 
meetings, committees, functions and 



authority are among the issues to be 
analyzed and resolved by the commit- 
tee. 

"There are many good people who 
work at the College, and we need their 
input," Dr. Bowers said. He has 
therefore devised a selection process for 
the steering committee, which will allow 
persons at different levels of employ- 
ment at the College to share in the ac- 
tual decision-making process. 

According to Dr. Bowers, the 
steering committee will be comprised of 
a "reasonable mix of appointed, elected 
and selected members," and a "balance 
representing all College constituents." 

He stated that the first four 
members of the steering committee have 
been appointed by Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, 
division director. Integrated Studies and 
chairperson of the Long-Range Plann- 
ing Committee; Dr. Jeannette L. Eraser, 



dean of educational research, planning 
and evaluation; James E. Logue, 
associate professor, English, and 
chariperson of the Long-Range Plann- 
ing Committee on Institutional Gover- 
nance; and Dr. Bowers himself. 

Five steering committee members 
are to be elected by the entire faculty 
from nine areas, including Busmess, 
Construction, Health, Intergrated 
Studies, Natural Resources, Secondary 
Programs, Transportation, and 
Developmental Counseling and Library 
areas. 

Six committee members will be 
selected from six areas: Academic Af- 
fairs, Administrative Affairs, APT 
staff(levels H, I, and J only), Classified 
Staff, Senice Staff, and a student who 
will be selected by a process coordinated 
by Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, director of 
student services. 



Following the selection of the steer- 
ing committee, the committee chairper- 
son will be selected by the committee 
itself, stated Dr. Bowers. 

"The work and resulting recom- 
mendations of the committee will have 
significant impact on the total future 
operation of the College," commented 
Dr. Bowers , adding that the committee 
will be active beginning in mid- 
November through at least the Spring of 
1986 semester. 

He emphasized that the goverance 
system will not supercede the authority 
of the Board of Trustees or the presi- 
dent, but will work in conjunction with 
those authorities, "making the institu- 
tion strong." 

The steering committee, according 
to Dr. Bowers will hopefully meet 
before or unmediately after Thanksgiv- 
ing. 



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SGA 

StndenI Action 
Concem/Soggntion Form 



Write your concern in this space 



Your suggestion to the problem (write in space below) 



Date Submitted: 

Student: Yes 



.Full-time 



.Part-time 



Other 



Curriculum: 
Name: 



Local Address: 



Telephone: 

Signature Required: 



Official use only. Please do not write past this Une. 



Date Recieved: 
By Whom: 

How problem was resolved: 



Employment 
Opportunities 

Carpentry students needed to in- 
stall some book shelves. Call Ellen 
Watts at 323-0397. 

Santa's Assistant. ..beginning 
Saturday, Nov. 23 at 10 a.m. until 2 or 
3 p.m., six days a week through Dec. 
23. Would be located in Center City 
Mall, taking pictures of children with 
Santa, collecting money and keeping an 
account of pictures. Contact Dave 
Howe at HATS Howe About 
Temps-323-9443. $3.35 an hour. 

Susquehanna Room. ..students 
wanted for part-time, in Susquehanna 
Room, days or nights. Get appUcations 
at the personnel office. 

RESEARCH ASSISTANT with Yiddish 
proficiency, needed to assist College 
professor at Cornell University in Ithaca 
N.Y. for five days( Dec. 19-23). 
S3.50/hr., lodging, and transpor- 
tation included. Contact Dr. Thomas 
Walker, Room 317, ACC, or call Ext. 
403. 



REMINDER: 

WORK STUDY students are reminded 
that time sheets must be subtnitted to 
the Financial Aid Office in the 
Academic Center by noon this Friday, 
Nov. 22, for payments to be made on 
Wednesday. Nov. 27, 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, No«. ie, 1985 - Vol. 21, No. 12 

Tlie SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday 
morning of the academic year, except tor Col- 
lege vacations, by journalism and other In- 
terested students of The Wllllamsporl Area Com- 
munity College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 
W. Third St., Wllllamsport, Pa. 17701. 
Telephone: (717) 328-3761, Extension 221, 



Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or of those whose names accom- 
pany Items. Opinions do not reflect official opi- 
nion of the institution. 



THE STAFF 
Wanna F. Brawn, Managing Edllot; Sandra L. 
Musgrave, Ed/for/a/ Page Editor: LeRoy S. Whlt- 
mlre. Photograpny Editor: Kathy L. Cobb, Ad- 
ministrative Affairs Editor: Kelly S. Hen-old. Stu- 
dent Affairs Reporter: Cynthia E.A, Hartranft, 
Advertising Manager: Lyie A. Wagner, Produc- 
tion Coord/nalor, Timothy F. Neldig, PMT 
Darkroom Technician: Michael A. Dye.Sfaff Ar- 
tist 



OEPORTERSfSTAFF ASSOCIATES 

Cathertne A. Hannon, Dl-Ann I. Hess, Susan 
R. Kallansrud, Joel J. Mader, Lisa E, Sechst, 
Donna L Thmbie Actng adviser James D. 
Carpenter 



SPOTLICHTDMondty, Nef.U, l«5n3 



SPOTLIGHT//!^... Dr. Robert G. Bowers 

By Kathy L. Cobb, of The SPOTLIGHT Stiff 




ISPOTUGHT pholo by Lisa E. Secrisl/. 

Great American Smokeout Qoldfeder to be honored 
scheduled for Thursday ^^ ^ ^,^^^^^ ^^^^ p^^ 

Observance of the ninth annua) fessor of Business Adminastration at the 

Great American Smolceout is scheduled College, will be honored as a past presi- 

for the 24-hour period from midnight, dent of the Pennsylvania Business 

Wednesday, Nov. 20, to midnight. Education Association during the 

Thursday, Nov. 21. group's 15 annual conference this Fri- 

Sponsored by the American Cancer day through Sunday, Nov. 15-17, at the 

Society, the Smokeout is held each year Marriott Inn in Harrisburg. 
on the Thursday before Thanksgiving. ^= 

It is an upbeat, good-natured effort to NEVER BEFORE anything like it. An 

encourage smokers to give up smoking international organization for ALL 

for 24 hours, if only to prove to singles. See our display ad for a final 

themselves that they can. special offer. (After this week, full price 

This year's Smokeout goal is to get appUes.| 

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"...the most important activity... is the 
instruction.. .it's what we're all about. " 

"I believe the most important activity that happens at this institution is the 
instruction... it's the bottom line.. .it's what we're all about, "commented Dr. 
Robert G. Bowers, executive assistant for internal affairs, and part-time 
mathematics instructor for the College. 

Dr. Bowers stated that he is very committed to the principle of the com- 
munity college, and to the ideal of classroomThands-on instruction. "Although 
I appreciate the importance of what I am doing now, I look forward to someday 
returning to full-time teaching," he said. 

Dr. Bowers first came to the College in 1966 as a mathematics instructor. 
In 1976, he became Division Director of Mathematics, Science and Allied 
Health. At the time, he also served the prior College president as his half-time 
assistant. 

When Dr. Robert L. Breuder came to the College as president in 1981, Dr. 
Bowers continued in the same capacity and temporarily served eight months as 
dean of academic affairs while the College searched for someone to fill that posi- 
tion. Once the spot was filled, Dr. Bowers moved into his present job. 

Before coming to the College, Dr. Bowers received several degrees from 
various mstitutions, a bachelor's degree m mathematics from Juniata College in 
Huntington, a master's degree in mathematics from the University of Delaware, 
Newark, Delaware, and a doctorate in mathematics education from the Penn- 
sylvania State University which he completed during a leave of absence from the 
CoUege in 1971. 

As Executive Assistant for Internal Affairs, Dr. Bowers focuses on faculty 
relationships and the negotiating process, and assists the CoUege president with 
the groundwork and research for all legal and labor matters concerning the Col- 
lege. Special projects he has coordinated for the president include the 
Distinguished Teaching Awards, the APT Salary Systems, the sponsorship issue, 
and the new College Governance System. 

In his spare time, he serves as a member of the Loyalsock Township School 
Board. His hobbies mclude investments and travel— Florida and other locations 
on the east coast rate as his favorite vacation spots. 

"I am also an avid gardener; I run a small greenhouse m the spring," he 
stated, adding, "I usually grow from seed about 2,000 dozen plants." 

Dr. Bowers' wife, Nancy, is also employed by the College as an instructor 
of mathematics. The couple has one child. Susan,^. 

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4DSP(mJGHTDMoiid«j, Not.1I, IMS 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For Week of Monday, Nov. 1« (taroggh Sondiy, Not.24 

MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega.. .7 p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 20, Room 218, Academic 
Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau Fratemity(GET)...noon, tomorrow, Nov. 19, Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous...? to 8 p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 20, Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association... Executive committee, 4 p.m.. tomor- 
row, Nov. 19, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

PEL Dance.. .9 to midnight, this Wednesday, Nov. 20, Susquehanna 
Room, admission $1.00 per person, $1.50 per couple. Refreshments will be 
sold. 

Stuffed Animals Raffle.. .now through Nov. 25, main campus and the 
Earth Science campus. Open to students and general public. Tickets, 50 cents; 
sponsored by the Horticulture Technicians Association. For further information, 
contact Rich Weilminster, Ext. 34 at the Earth Science Division. 

Bake sale.. .8 a.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 20, Academic Center lobby; 
sponsored by Gamma Epsilon Tau. 

Rollerskating...g:30 p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Nov. 21, at Skating 
Plus, located on Via Bella and Williams streets. Free to students of the College 
with validated ID. Skating rentals available for 75 cents. Guests welcome, but 
must pay $2 at the door. 

Family Lecture Series. .."Self-actualization," 7 to 10 p.m., tomorrow, 
Nov. 19, YWCA, 185 W. Fourth St.; must register today, phone 322-4737. 
Cost is $3 per person, $S per couple. 



Susquehanna Room Menu for the Week 

The Susquehanna Room's menu for the week starting today, Monday, Nov. 
18, is presented as furnished by the Susquehanna Room management. 
DiUj Breakfut 

Scrambled eggs, 59'; hash browns, 55"; home fries, 55'; pancakes, $1.29; French toast, 99"; 
waffles, 99'; sausage, 79" 

Daily Sahd Bar 

Salad Bar mcludes Super Bowl, tomatoes, onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple but- 
ler, jello, potato salad, com reUsh 



FHI BEIA 
LAMBDA 

HOLIDAY 
DANCE 

Wednesday, Nov. 20 

9 p.m. to 12 a.m. 

In the Susquehanna Room LRC 

Featuring a local radio station 
disc jockey 

FIRST TIME 
EVER 

Selected videos of 

Top 30 songs 

to be shown on 

large screen 

ADMISSION: 

$1.50 person 
$1.00 with can of 
food I 



Single? Then be a fulfilled single. Go 
First Cabin with the world's only inter- 
national NETWORK for ALL singles. 
NOT a 'Lonely Heart's Qub' nor a 
dating service. This one's for YOU! 
Last chance for a really great offer: See 
our display ad. 



Moida;, No? . II 
Lunch 

Franks and sauerkraut, $l.99,macarom& 
cheese w/vegetable, S2.19. 
Soap 
Beef barley, tomato rice 

Dinner 
Chicken & ribs, potato & vegetable, S2.89, 
Swedish meatballs, potato &. vegetable, $2.39. 
Sindwicha 
Quarter pounder, SI. 25; Cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, $.55; pizza w/topping, $.70; Am 
hoagie, $1.49; roast pork sandwich, $1.59; ham 
& cheese, $1.59; turkey, $1.59; Irench tries, 
$.55 

Taeidiy, Nov. 19 
LoDch 
Kielbassi & pierogi, potato & vegetable, 
$2.39; turkey breast, filling, gravy, potato & 
vegeuble; $2.39 

Sonp 
Cream of mushroom, minestrone 

Dinner 
Linguine/red clam sauce, Italian bread, french fries, 55 
$2.89; Swiss steak, potato & vegetable, $2.89. 

Sandwiches Friday, Not. 22 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, Lnnch 

$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with toppmg, 70'; Am. Breaded pork chop, gravy, potato and 

hoagie, $1.49; steak & cheese, $1.79; grilled vegetable, $2.59; Ham and cheese omelet home 
cheese, $.79 shrimp salad, $1.79; trench fries, fri«, toast, $2.89 



Dinner 

Chicken & biscuits, vegetable $2.89; filled 
meat loaf, potato & vegetable, $2.59 
Sandwiches 

Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; croissant melt, $1.79; tuna salad, 
$1.59; roast beef, $1.59; French fries, 55'. 

Thursday, Nov. 21 
Lnnch 

Beef & peppers, pouto & vegetable, $2.59; 
Baked ziti, Italian bread, $2.19 
Snap 
Chicken noodle, cream of potato. 

Dinner 
Ham loaf, potato & vegeuble,$2.59; chili 
con came, potato & vegetable, $2.59. 
Sandwiches 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; chicken salad in pita, $1.59; fried 
bologna/cheese, $1.29; bacon club, $1.79; 



55'. 

Wednesday, Not. 2t 
Lnnch 

French dip, potato & vegetable, $2.59; 
chop sirloin, gravy, potato & vegetable, $2.39 
Sonp 
French onion. New England clam chowder 



Soup 

Chih, or vegetable Iwef. 
Saadwkhes 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70'; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; fiish sandwich, $1.29; meatball 
hoagie, $1.59; ham BBQ, $1.25; French fries, 
55'. 



Cillo's 

College 
Corner 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Phone 322-1321 

HOURS • Mod. thru Thurs. 

7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Open for Breakfast 

* • • 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 

Four winners 
every week 

•k -k -k 

Your favorite Subs and 

Burgers the way you like 'em 

Come on over and gel 
somethin' good to eat! 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Clean, well-heated rooms w/shower and kitchen available. 
Newly remodeled. Across from WACC. 
$575 /semester, all utilities included. 
Call 323-3663, or inquire at: Barry's Sub Shop at 234 Park St. 
[Opposite east parking lot] 
ALSO: 3 bedroom apartment for rent. 



Brillllfinin 
1 
unnunniL 
Basils 



BflHBBBHHH, 



1 Hour Photo Lab, Inc. 

A....IAlllll?lllllt>lllt^.hTrrf.HtTlT.WTTW.Tpm.TTTm.TtT>t^.VTTm.TlWl 



Basin Street Shopping Center 
323-7844 



I hour or same day service on all color in-lab processing 
(11(1, 126, 135, or disc film). 
10 percent discount to all WACC students and faculty with valid ID. on 
all in-lab color processing services. 

(Discount not valid with other promotions or discounts) 

SPECIAL OFFER FROM KODAK until Nov. 20. 
$3.00 off personal posters from your favorite 35mffl 
color photo, slide or negative 



Originally 

Now 



$17.95 
$14.95 



POTLIGHT « 

— "^^ — ^^ — ^ HAPPY 

Moaday, Not. 25, 1M5 • Vol. W, No.I3 • 8 Paget WfltUnupoH Arm Coowiiity College • WUUaBsport. Pt. 17791 THANKSGIVING! 



Food, cash 

Campaign 

Successful 

Phi Beta Lambda(PBL) completed 
its "Feed a Friend" food and money 
collection last Friday, according to Paul 
W. Goldfeder, associate professor of 
business and the group's adviser. 
Goldfeder termed the campaign"very 
suaessful." 

The organization, along with the 
Multi-Cultural Society, participated in 
the program, sponsored by WNEP-TV 
in Avoca, designed to help fight hunger 
in Northeastern and Central Penn- 
sylvania. The food and money dona- 
tions will be distributed throughout the 
area by the American Rescue Workers, 
Goldfeder said. 

In other PEL news this week, the 
organization will begin a Christmas 
"Trim a Tree" project at the Lycoming 
Mall in Muncy this Wednesday, Nov. 
27. The group is participating on behalf 
of the Lycommg Health and Lung 
Association, with proceeds benefitting 
children's asthma research. 

PEL'S 13 annual Christmas Ean- 
quet and Dance is scheduled for 8 p.m. 
on Dec. 6 at the King's Inn, South 
Williamsport. 




.AMk 



PBL Banner Reported missing 



Phi Beta Lambda's banner, being 
used on its "Feed a Friend" collection 
table in the lobby of the Academic 
Center, has been reported missing, ac- 
cording to adviser Paul W. Goldfeder. 



Any information concerning the 
disappearance or location of the ban- 
ner, 3x5 foot blue and gold banner, 
should contact Goldfeder or any PEL 
member. 




ROBERT L. ROHR , an avtaUon technology student from Camp 

looks over the College's recently-acquired T-67 jet engine, ispotuoht photo by LisairsecrSif. 



Construction of the Advanced 
Technology and Allied Health Center 
conUnnes on Sniqaehuu Slitet. 
Constmcdon began in Augnsl, comple- 
don is set for Jnly 1987, according to 
Donald E. Pelenon, dein of general 
services. 
ISPOTUOHT photo by LeRoy S. mUmire Jrj. 

College 
Receives 
Jet engine 

Students in the College Aviation 
program have a cunent jet engine to 
work on this year, thanks in part to a 
former student who graduated from the 
College's forerunner, the Williamsport 
Technical Institute(WTI), over 30 years 
ago. 

The College received a used T-67 
turbine jet engine, valued at nearly 
$250,000, in a swap with the Allison 
Gas Turbme Division of General 
Motors Corp. for a post-Worid War II 
jet engine valued at about $70,000, that 
had been used by the College for 
demonstrational purposes since the late 
1940's. 

Allison scouts the country for old 

engines for its museum in IndianapoUs, 

■■■ Please turn to Page 8 



ZoSPOTUGHTDMoMli;, Not. 25, IMS 

Whaddya' say...? 

The Question: Do you wear a seat belt while in a car? Do you 
think that the seat belt law is a^ infringement on your personal 

freedom? Pliotos and Intarvlawi by Donna L. Trimble. 





Vl 



Jon D. Heinly, advertis- 
ing art student from Mt. Plea- 
sant, "Yes \ do wear a seat belt, 
and the new law doesn't bother 
me, because I wear one any sonal freedom." 
way." 



Lisa A. Graeff, an advertis- 
ing art student, from 
Williamsport,"No, I don't wear 
one, but I probably should. Yes 
it is an infringement of your per- 




m& 




Lisa E, Secrist, an in- 
tegrated Studies student from 
Muncy, "Yes, I do wear a seat 
belt, the new law beats the air 
bag idea." 



Kelly E. Beatty, an advertis- 
ing art student, from Milton, "No, I 
don't wear a seatbelt, but it is a 
good idea. I feel that it is up to 
the person whether or not 
he/she wants to wear one." 




James E. Mothersbaugh, a 
broadcasting student from Mun- 
cy; "I think that more people 
should wear seatbelts, but I think 
it should be of their own free 
will, not an enforcement. 



Judy L. Brokaw, a com- 
puter science from Canton, 
"Yes, I think it is an infringement 
on your freedom. I think it is up 
to the person to decide if he 
wishes to wear a seat belt." 



Seatbelts can save lives 

Commentary by the SPOTLIGHT 

Early this month a young Snyder County couple was killed In an accident. 
They were thrown from their four-wheel-drive vehicle because they weren't 
wearing their seatbelts. Their one-year-old son was taken to a nearby hospital 
and was released with no Injuries. He was found wide-eyed and looking 
around-sitting In a child restraint seat. 

In the SPOTLIGHT'S opinion, not wearing your seat belt Is writing your 
own death sentence. 

Most highway fatalities are not due to the Initial contact of the vehicle, but 
result from the "second collision." Unprotected, the Instantaneous Impact of 
the occupants within the vehicle causes the deaths and maiming. 

Within the past year. New York and New Jersey have been Joined by 
several other states in passing the Seatbelt Law. Residents of those states are 
required to "buckle-up". Pennsylvania passed the bill unanimously In the 
House of Representatives and It Is currently being debated In the Senate. 

Car accidents kill and Injure more children than any disease. 

Since 1 978, parents In nine states have been required to use restraints for 
children up to age tour. Pennsylvania is among them. 

Seatbelt safety laws have been proven time and time again. Ask anyone 
who has been Involved In an accident and escaped with minor or no injuries 
because of having their seal belt fastened. 

Patrolman Mark Wolfberg of the Seiinsgrove Police Department feels 
strongly about seat belts now. "I wear mine religiously," he said. 

Within the last four years, patrolman Wolfberg was Involved in two major 
accidents. The first was a "hit from behind" and put him through the wind- 
shield. He didn't have his seat belt on and was off work for two months. 

The second was a T-bone accident. He was traveling about 55 m.p.h. 
when the crash occured, "I actually fell the seatbelt hold. ..I didn't budge," he 
said. 

Driving Is fun; It's also dangerous. Sooner or later you must stop, either 
on your own or by accident. Your destiny may depend on whether or not 
you're wearing your seatbelt. 

Remember, seatbelts double your chances of surviving a crash. Bucl<le- 
up. 

Hooters, Outfield equals 
a spectacular show 

Concert review by Yvette Russle, broadcasting student from 
Wllllamsport 



The Hooters, who performed 
before nearly 3,300 fans, put on a 
spectacular performance at Lycoming 
College's gymnasium Nov. 16, giving 
the crowd a night to remember. 

Despite rain, sleet, and cold 
temperatures, devoted fans stood In 
line for nearly an hour, ignoring the 
weather while waiting to enter. 

When the group finally appeared, 
the crowd leaped to their feet, whistl- 
ing, cheering, and applauding. The 
five-man band from Philadelphia open- 
ed their act with "Day by Day", a cut 
from their latest album, "Nervous 
Night". The Hooters then performed 
other newly released hit singles as "All 
You Zombles,""Don't Take My Car 
Out Tonlghr' and "Hanging On A 
Heartbeat," along with some of their 
past popular tunes. 

In addition to the band's excellent 
stage performance, special effects as 
stage props and multi-colored stage 
lights helped to create the mood for the 
show. 

With Incredible sound, the Hooters 
hooted out tunes lor nearly two hours 
while the crowd went wild hooting and 
hollering with them. 

Opening for the Hooters was the 
Outfield, a newly formed band from 
London, England, who performed their 
top hit single, "Say It Isn't So," They 
too put on a fantastic show and helped 



get the audience rowled up and ready 
for the main show. 

The overall concert In mvTopinion 
was the best performance In 
Wllllamsport. If I were to rate the 
Hooters along with the Outfield on a 
scale of one to ten I would have to give 
both of them an eleven. 



SPOTLIOHT 
Mondiy, Nov. 26, 1986 - Vol. 21, No 13 

The SPOTUGHT Is published each Monday 
morning of the academic year, except (or Col- 
lege vacations, by loumallsm and other In- 
terested students of The Vinlllamsport Area Com- 
munity College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 100£ 
W. Third St., Wllllamsport, Pa 17701 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 221. 

Opinions expressed are those of the studen; 
newspaper or of those whose names accom- 
pany Items, Opinions do not reflect official op|. 
nion of the Institution. 



The SPOTUGHT Is a member of 
the Columble ScholBstic Press Association 

THE STAFF 

Wanna F. Brown, Managing Editor: Sandra L 
Musgrave,f d/loria/ Page Editor: LeRoy S Whit- 
mlre, Photography Editor: Kathy L, Cobb Ad- 
ministrative Affairs Editor: Kelly S, Herroid! Stu- 
dent Affairs Peporler: Cynthia EA. Hartranft 
Advertising fHanager: Lyio A, Wagner Proffuc- 
lion Coofd/naror, Timothy F, Noldig PMT 
Dartfroom Technician: Michael A, Dye Staff Ar- 
(tef.Usa E, Secrist, Sports Reporter 

REPORTERSfSTAFF ASSOCIATES 

Cathorino A, Hannon Joel J, leader, Donna 
L- Trimble. Acting adviser: James D 
Carpenter 



Mike's Musings""""^ 

by Mike Hoover, computer science student 



[Editor's note: This is a trial column, depending on reader's response. The 
SPOTLIGHT encourages comments on this column as well as matters on and (iff cam- 
pus/. 

Hil Welcome to my column. I got this gig by writing a Letter to the 
Editor. The SPOTLIGHT staff told me they wish more students would 
take the time to let other students know how they feel through the cam- 
pus newspaper. It doesn't have to be a spectacular letter; just scribble it 
on a piece of paper and have someone type it. We would enjoy hearing 
from you. 

When I get the newspaper at night. I always make it a point to read 
the Letters to the Editor. I have always thought this was an excellent 
forum, especially in small rural areas. I must admit, however, that they're 
beginning to seem a little dull to me. I think the problem is that it's always 
the same old normal people speaking out about the same old normal 
issues. I don't think a large enough cross-section of the general public is 
being heard from. Sure, you read letters from the guy who is in jail and 
has bugs crawling on his floor, but even this is getting boring. I wish the 
less verbal members of our society would be compelled to write. For in- 
stance, I would enjoy reading this letter from a paranoid consumer; 

Dear Editor, 
Everything I buy has Beatrice on it. Everytime I see the end of a TV 
commercial, a female voice says "We're Beatrice". I walked into an 
elevator the other day and a voice said "We're Beatrice". That voice is 
driving me crazy. It's in my car. It's in my bedroom. Who are these peo- 
ple? What do they want from me? Can anybody help me? 

Paul Ripbaum 

Or I would enjoy reading this letter from a member of our drug culture; 

Dear Editor, 
People are always trying to tell me how I feel on drugs. This makes 
me mad. It seems that every drug gives you a feeling of "euphoria". 
What the heck does that mean? None of my friends ever say, "Wow 
man, this drug is really great. I feel very euphoric'". All you experts out 
there, stop telling me how I feel on drugs or I'll come over and 
"euphoriate" your dog. 

Jimmy Bosco 

When was the last time you read a letter from a Proctologist?; 

Dear Editor, 
I am sick and tired of hearing Proctologist jokes. "Hey Doc, little 
behind in your work?" they say, and other things you wouldn't print. It's 
getting harder and harder to walk around with any dignity. People don't 
treat neurosurgeons this way. I'm writing this to warn my patients that 
I've just about had it, and they're in a very vulnerable position. 

David Hemstien 
Proctologist 

So, if you're a social misfit, speak outi It's people like you who can 
spice up the Letters to the Editor in your local newspaper or the 
SPOTLIGHT. Don't write in to complain about a local zoning ordinance; 
that's boring. Be creative and be heard, 'til next time. 



Sociobiology discussed 



SPOTUGffTOMmdt;, Not. 2S, IMSDJ 



Dr. Roy P. Fontaine, psychology 
instructor at the College, held the se- 
cond in a series of presentations about 
learning last Tuesday, Nov. 19. 

Dr. Fontaine discussed 
sociobiology, a collection of theories 
that explains human behavior. 
Sociobiology is the idea that biological 
factors influence human behavior and 
other behavior in society. Some aspects 
of this behavior reflect evolution and 
natural selection. 

The focus of the presentation on 
sociobiology was altruism, behavior 



that benefits one individual at the cost 
of another. The key concepts of 
altruism are kin selection and inclusive 
fitness (personal fitness). 

Dr. Fontaine discussed E.O. 
Wilson, an entomolgist who has had a 
strong mfluence in the field of 
sociobiology. Wilson has theories that 
hnk insect societies to altruism. 

After the presentation, the faculty 
and staff that attended discussed the 
presentation and asked Dr. Fontaine 
questions concerning the material he 
presented. 




Dnane Updike left, and Sharon G. Dibble practice cardio- 
pnlmonary resoMltatioii on "Anatomical Anne," at tlie North 
Campng in WeOsboro. 

New careers being sought 
In training at North Campus 

story and ptcture bj Ditu C. Vinflect, general studies student from Linden 

What do a 30-year dairy fanner from Mansfield and a £jttt .Marsh 
housewife and mother of two young children have in common? 

They're two of 14 students enrolled in the College's Human Services 
Technician Program at the North Campus, Wellsboro, who are studying for new 
career opportunities. 

"I'm looking to the future. I see an opportunity to do something 
difierent," dairy fanner Duane Updike said. He is considering adding extra 
courses later to supplement the program or entering the practical nursing pro- 
gram. 

Mrs. Sharon G. Dibble agreed, adding, "This is a time in my Ufe when I 
felt 1 needed something more." She hopes to work in home health care, helping 
with the elderly, recuperating hospital patients, and new mothers in their homes. 

The revolutionary course is designed to provide training for entry-level posi- 
tions in hospitals, nursing homes, daycare centers, schools, social agencies, and 
home health care. 

Students follow a 24-week course of study which includes psychological 
theory, first aid and CPR, basic nursing care, crisis intervention, and health and 
nutrition. 

Gasses are held on Tuesday and Thursday nights and on alternate Satur- 
days. Once class work is finished, each student must complete a 100-hour prac- 
ticum in the human services area. 

Ms. Daisy Hemdon, first aid, CPR and health instructor, explained that 
one of the purposes of the program is to fill the gap between hospital and nursing 
home care. "It's the best thing that's happened to this country as far as prepar- 
ing people for entry-level human services positions, "she said. 

The tuition for the program is $150, and for some of the students the course 
helps them decide whether they want to spend the time and money to continue in 
this area, according to Mrs. Brenda G. Abplanalp, assistant coordinator of 
practical nursing and acting director of the North Campus. 

The present class will complete training at the end of April. Classes will 
begin again next October. 



4DSP(mJGHTDMoid»j, Nof. IS, IMS 

Susquehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 

Moidi;, Not. IS 
Uick 

Roast chicken, gravy, potato & vegetable, 
S2.39, Saiuage calabrese, Italian bread, $2.39. 
Soip 
Com chowder, Beef Noodle 

DIuer 
Salisbury steak, pouto i vegetable, S2.39 
Fiih A Chips, vegetable, S 2.39 
Saidwkbci 
Quarter pounder, $I.2S; Cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, $.55; pizza w/lopping, $.70; Am 
hoagie, $1.49; meatloaf sandwich, $1.29; turkey 
sandwich, $1.59; tuna salad, $1.59; french fries, 
$.55 

Tieiday, Not. 24 

Uich 

Linquioe/red clam sauce, Italian bread 
$2.59; Ham loaf, potato t vegeuble, $2.59 
Soap 
Chicken rice, vegetable chowder 

DIuer 

Filled chicken breast, gravy, potato 
A vegetable, $2.79, Deepsea delite, potato & 
vegeUble, $2.95 

Saadwickei 
Quarter pounder, $1.25; cheeseburger, 
$1.35; pizza, 55'; pizza with topping, 70*; Am. 
hoagie, $1.49; egg salad sandwich, $1.29; 
chickenhoagie, $1.59,taco, 99'; French fries, 
55'. 

Wednesday, Not. 27 
SBsqaehanoa Room 
will be open from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. today 

Sii^nhaua Room 

will be closed Thursday, Nov.28 through 
Sunday, Dec. I 

Special Boon 

Open Monday, Dec. 2, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Refiiar Hoan 

The Susquehanna Room will resume 
regular hours on Tuesday, Dec. 3 



Coed schedule 

VollcrbiU 
Tonight, Mondij, Not. 25 

7 p.m. Bums vs. Net Busters 

Straub Greenies vs. Stroh's Greeoies 

8:15 WACC Staff vs. MCB 

Euphoria vs. RAM 



iDtrimnral baiketball 
whednle for the week of Nov. 25 
is u follows: Todiy, Monday, 
Not. 25 at 4 p.m, is Nads ti. Dan; at 5 
p.m. The Crne ti. Mean Machine. 
Tuesday, Not. 2i at 4 p.m. Dani ts. 
The Crne; at 5 p.m. Just Ui ts. Nads. 



Results of the Men's 
voUeybtdl playoffs are as follows: 
Monday, Not. 19 The Hooters 
OTer Bhck Sheep 8-15, 15-10,and 
15-11; Scnmbuzzards OTer The Grim 
Reapers 15-3, and 15-12; Mean 
Machine oTer Sli Packers 12-15, 15-i, 
and 15-12; Scnmbnizardi OTcr the 
Hooters 15-7 and 15-9; The Grim 
Reapers OTcr Black Sheep 15-8 and 
15-5. Taesdaj, Not. 20 Sh Pack oTer 
Pnrple Renobs 15-9 and 15-9; Mean 
Machine oTer SU Pack 15-10 and 15-8; 
Porpie Remobs OTer Six Packers 15-8 
and 15-9. 

The means eliminated by two 
losses. 



The intramnrai basketball results 
for week 2 are as follows: Monday, 
Not. 18 The Crne oyer Dan 53-44, and 
Jnst Us OTer Nads 74-43. Tuesday, 
NoTcmber 19 The Crne OTcr Just Us 
46-39, and Dan OTer Mean Machine 
58-52. Wednesday, Not. 20 Mean 
Machine OTcr Nads by forfeit, and Jnst 
Us over Dan iO-52. 



OPEN GYM CANCELLED FOR Nov. 27, 1985 



I Peer Information and Referral 



Complete 
Confidentiality 




Room 105 
Gymnasium 
Hours: 
Mon.-Thurs.: 
10 a.m.-S p.m. 

Friday: 

10 a.m.-4 p.m. 

Closed Weekends 



Center - \ 

I 
I 

If you have a problem, I 

come and talk to us i 

whether the problem | 

is major or small I 



i 
I 

i 
i 

I 



Students helping 
fellow students 




LOST and FOUND is filling ap fast, according to CccU C. 
Cryder, chief of security. Cryder reports that several coats, 
perscription eyeglasses, watches and other items, shown above, are 
presently in his possession. Lost items may be claimed at the 
Security Office in the General Services Building on Park Street. 
Cryder said that as soon as students notice they've lost something 
they should come to his office and fill out a form so that if found 
the item may easily be identified. He abo noted simply writing 
ones name on the inside cover of a book would assure a quick 
return to its owner. 

ISPOTUGHT photo by URoy S. WhitmireJrj. 



PudgiB*s Pia3a 

FREE DELIVERY 
ALL DAY/ALL NIGHT 

Sun. thru Thurs. 11:00 a.m.-11:30 p.m. 
Fri. & Sat. 11:00 a.m.-1:30 a.m. 




322-4746— 322-4747 



BUFFALO 

NEW YORK STYLE 

WINGS 



If You Want to Use Drugs... 

That's Your Business 

If You Want to Stop 

That's Ours! 

There Is Help... 

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS 

Wednesday Meetings 

7 P.M. to 8 P.M. 

Room B107 

LIFELONG EDUCATION CENTER 
(LEC) 




Dr. Thomas J. E. Walker , associate professor of history, government, 
sociology; joined the College staff in the Fall 1985 term. 

New government course offered 

story and photo by liu E. Secriit of the SPOTUGHT staff 

A new course in government is being offered by the College through the In- 
tergrated Studies Division OtBce. The class is scheduled to begin m the Spring 
term. 

The course, GOV 299-01, is entitled International Relations, taught by Dr. 
Thomas J.E. Walker, associate professor of history, government and sociology. 

International Relations is an examination of global politics through an 
analysis of the distinctions among modem nation-states and the influence gover- 
ning their international relations. 

The goal of this course is to assist the student in forming the habit of put- 
ting himself/herself into the positions of adversary peoples in order to unders- 
tand that international conflict, rooted as it is in history, philosophy, and 
ideology (as may be contrasted with facts) and the political attitudes of both 
poUtical eUtes and national citizens. 

The class at this point will be conducted in a seminar form, but is subject to 
change. Walker stated. The class offers the student in business, poUtical science, 
economics, and other classes; an opportunity to discuss world trends from dif- 
ferent aspects. 

The class will cover the main points of view the first is the American, the se- 
cond is the Soviets, third is the China, fourth America's Allies and fifth is the 
Third World. 

Therefore, course emphasis will be placed upon perceptions and perspec- 
tives so that the student may ask the question, "Now that you understand the 
forces that play upon the Soviet (or Chinese or Third World nations) attitude 
regarding this issue or knowing that attitude was formed by historical ' 
and ideological factors different from those that form the American attitude, are 
you able to explain the causes, condition and prospects of international condi- 
tions better than you were previously?" stated Walker. 




Dr. Walker attends 
Exchange cortference 

Dr. Thomas J.E. Walker, associate 
professor of history, government and 
sociology, attended the International 
Exchange Conference at Shippensburg 
University last Wednesday and Thurs- 
day, Nov. 20-21. 

During the conference Walker at- 
tended several sessions on student ex- 
change in different countries. 

International exchange is designed 
to provide a linkage between higher 
education in the United States and 
foreign countries; particularly those 
that are Spanish speaking, Egypt, Ger- 
many, and Eastern Europe. 



SPOTUGBTDMoidaT. Not. 25, 1M5d5 

Contact lenses can 
transport virus to eyes 

Wetting your contact lenses in your 
mouth, a rather common practice, is 
potentially quite dangerous, says the 
Journal of the American Medical 
Association. 

Viruses, including herpes, can be 
transmitted to the eyes through 'auto- 
innoculation' (self-infection) from other 
parts of the body, according to Janet R. 
Querimit, Nurse, Student Health Ser- 
vices. 

For more information, go to Room 
104, of the gymnasium. 



REMEMBER THEM 
WITH 

LOVE... 

AND HALLMARK 
CHRISTMAS CARDS! 




STUFF 

FOR SHOCKINGS! 




STORE HAUE AND ADDRESS 

WACC Bookstore 
LRCBuUding 



6dSPOTLIGHTDMo«<I«j, Not. 25, IMS 




DANCIN', DANCIN', DANCIN' -Tbil it exactly whit Harry J. 
RogenOeft), a broadcaitlng itadcnt from WOUinuport; Tbereu M. Roneo, a 
broadcaiting itadcnt from MontoursTille, and Dennis E. Wllion, broadcasting 
itndent from Canton, are doing. The Dance wa> ipouored by Phi Beta 
Lambda and wai held in the Sosqnehanna Room lait Wedneiday night. 



ISPOTUGHT photo by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr.] 



■■■«■■■ ■■L^ririii. 

416 River Avenue 



•Typingcc™™-* u Ml •Robber SUmpi •GlfC Wrappbig 

•PriTile Mil] Bom 'Keyi •Picki(ln| 

•Puiport Pbotof •Pboto CoplM •Aoiwerint Service 

•Noltrj PobUc •Renme Wrltlnj" •GUIwrap SuppUet 

Monday thru Friday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Pnni\ni' 
Saturday 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. rHV/lli:- 

ProlMalonal pack«glng ind ihlpplng ol your mitorlala I 
Wo'll ahlp your packaga via UPS or, II your packaga na«)a to gat t 
ahip II Air Expraaa for ovornlght dallvary. 



Blind student enters College 
secondary vocational program 

By Kalhy L. Cobb, Administrative Affairs Editor of the SPOTLIGHT stqff. 

Lait weelt, a blind student entered tlie College's secondary vocational pro- 
gram, according to Mrs. Elaine J. Lambert, interim director of communications. 

Greg Steinbaciier, a Montoursville Higli School junior from Trout Run, 
began his first week of training in the small engines repair program. Steinbacher 
is totally blind. 

To aid Steinbacher in preparation for his trade. Dr. Edward Geer, director 
of secondary vocational programs, arranged for Dale Jarrett, a blind mechanic 
ftom Sunbury, to provide special instruction and advice. Jarrett is employed by 
Manbeck Motors in Mifflinburg and he holds a certificate in auto mechanics 
from Vale Technical School in Blairsville. 

Janett addressed Steinbacher and several of his classmates, stressing the im- 
portance of the individual adapting to the work situation. He believes that the 
place of employment should not be changed to meet special needs, but rather the 
mdividual should be given a fair chance to adapt to the work place. 

In accordance, no College curriculum changes have been made for Stein- 
bacher, according to Dr. Geer. 

Steinbacher and Jarrett have more than blindness in common, they both at- 
tended the Overbrook School in Philadelphia, a school that specializes in 
educating the bUnd. 

While attending Montoursville High, Steinbacher is accompanied by an 
aide, Mrs. Nina Easton of the BLAST Intermediate Unit 17 of Wilhamsport. 
Mrs. Easton will remain with Steinbacher throughout his program at the Col- 
lege: 



PBL dance 
Is staged 

By Lisa E. Secrist 

Of the SPOTUGHT staff 

Phi Beta Lambda(PBL) 
fraternity held a dance last 
Wednesday, Nov. 20 to benefit its 
"Feed a Friend" campaign. 

The dance was a first of its 
kind, with the showing of the 
videos of top 40 songs. Special 
guests disc jockeys from the Col- 
lege radio station, WWAS, were 
Vincent Ceccacci, a broadcasting 
student from Ulysses, and Daniel 
E. Martuccio, a broadcasting stu- 
dent from Galeton. 



Library hours set 

Due to the Thanksgiving recess, the 
CoUege Library will be closed this 
Thursday, Nov. 28, through Sunday, 
Dec. 1. The Library will reopen for 
regular hours on Monday, Dec. 2. 

The Library also announced the 
purchase of several new books. 



Tuition quote incorrect 

A quote from Dr. William J. Mar- 
tin, dean of student services, in last 
week's story on student tuition costs 
was mcorrect and should have read: 
"My guess is that 20 percent of the 
[tuitionj increase will be taken care of 
by financial aid-maybe even more." 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Qean, weU-heated rooms available w/shower and kitchen. 
Newly remodeled, Across from WACC. 
$575 /semester, all utilities included. 

Call 323-3663, or inquire at: Barry's Sub Shop at 234 Park St. 
[Opposite east parking lot) 
ALSO: 3 bedroom apartment for rent. 



BARRY'S 




Open 7 a.m. to midnight 

Monday thru Friday 

Open Saturday I p.m. to 3 a.m. 



^ 



Barry says: We won't cook a burger before iU time. \ 

Brooklyn Style Eatery i^ 

j 

•A Unique Eating experience y 
•BEST Breakfast in Town v/ 
•Arcade and Pool Table 
•Daily Specials 

234 Park St. Just across from 
the new east parking lot 






SPOTUGHTDMudi;, No». 25, IMSD 1 



SPOTLIGHTiB^... 

William C. Allen 

Bj Kilhy L. Cobb, of The SPOTUGHT Staff 

"I enjoy being a part of the educational system.. .it gives one a feeling of 
making a contribution to society,"stated William C. Allen, dean of administra- 
tion. 

A native of WestJield, in Tioga County, Allen came to the College in 1976 
as Director of Financial Operations. He has lived in this area for 22 years. 

Prior to his employment by the College, he worked for 12 years as con- 
troller and financial vice president in the apparel industry. During that time, 
Allen says, he had occasion to travel to locations such as Virginia, Tennessee, 
New York and San Juan, Puerto Rico. 

He was also employed for two years by the Pennsylvania State University in 
the statistical analysis department. 

Allen holds a bachelor's degree in business management which he received 
from the Pennsylvania State University. 

As dean of administration, Allen's responsibihty includes budgeting, finan- 
cial operations, student registration/record maintenance, institutional research, 
business operations, employee benefits, the College Bookstore, the Susquehanna 
Room, and the administrative computer systems. 

Reflecting on the College, Allen commented, "I think the biggest financial 
challenge the College will have to face within the next two or three years will be 
the task of bringing into line and making affordable the non-sponsoring tuition 
costs." 

In his spare time, Allen enjoys golf, hunting and fishing. 

Allen's wife, Jane, is a purchasing agent with the Pennsylvania Department 
of Environmental Resources. The couple has two daughters, MeUssa and La 
Rae, and two grandchildren. Laurel and Edward. 

The family resides in Linden. - 



"...the biggest financial challange...will be...making 
affordable the non-sponsored tuition costs. " 




fSPOrUGHT pkolo by Lisa E. SecrisI/. 



Rec Center hours 
Altered for holiday 

The Recreation Center and In- 
tramural Activities have changed their 
schedules for the upcoming holiday. 

The Recration Center will close this 
Wednesday, Nov. 27 at 3:30 p.m.and 
reopen Dw. 3 at 7 a.m. 

The Intramural Activities will close 
tomorrow, Nov. 26 at 10 p.m. and 
reopen Dec. 3 at 4 p.m. 



Spring testing set 

The College will be testing, advis- 
ing, and scheduling new students for the 
spring 1986 semester on the following 
dates: Tuesday, Dec. 3; Saturday, Dec. 
7; Tuesday, Dec. 10; and Thursday, 
Dec. 12. 

Students who are scheduled to par- 
ticipate in the day's activities will take 
a placement exam, meet with various 
division personnel and faculty advisers, 
and have an opportunity to complete 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

Hoars: Mod.-SiI. II a.m. lo 9 p.m. Cloied Sunday 

Monday Regular Sub Whole $1.60 

Tuesday Meatball Whole $1.75 

Wednesday Turkey Whole $1.40 

DAILY SPECIALS Thursday Ham Whole $i;80 

Friday Tuna Whole $1.70 

Saturday Cheese Steak Whole $2.50 

•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" $4 whole $2.10 half 




SIM oft any 16-incb, 3-Hem or more pizii 
Onf Coupon Per Piutt 

Expires Dec. 2, 1985. 

(Customer pays sales lax and bollle deposit) 



Open for Lunch 

1:00 a.m. Sonday - Thonday 

■ 2 a.m. Friday k Saturday 




BENSON 



€Mnt mini. ^ 
ntnjnarket 



Corner of 3rd_a_nd Maynard^ Sts^. 

OOGOQOOC 



8aSPOTUGHTDMoiili)r, Nof. M, 1M5 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For Week of Monday, Not. 25 Ihroogh Snodij, Dec. 1 

MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega...? p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 27, Room 218, Academic 
Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau Fraternity.. .noon, tomoiiow, Nov. 26, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous...? to 8 p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 27, Room 
BIO?, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association. ..Executive committee, 4 p.m., tomor- 
row, Nov. 26, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association... Senate, 5 p.m., tomorrow, Nov. 26, 
Room BIO?. Lifeloni Education Center. 

UPCOMING EVENTS 

Thanksgiving Day.. .Nov. 28, 1985 

Thanksgiving Break. ..Nov. 28 through Dec. 2; no school 

Buck Season... First day, Dec. 2 

Hanukah...Dec.8 

Employment Opportunities 

(The iiiformalion here is provided by Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of 
Advisement, Career Services. Questions about this iifformalion should be 
directed to the Advisement Center, Room 157, Learning Resources Center.) 

JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT 

BroDart Inc., 500 Arch St., Williamsport; has an opening for a Junior Ac- 
countant. Duties include preparation and analysis of financial statement, ac- 
count analysis, coordinate between computer and accounting. Knowledge of 
computer a requirement. $10,400-$14,500 depending on qualifications and ex- 
perience. Call David Stark at 326-2461, ext. 483 for an appointment and an in- 
terview. 

INSURANCE 

Baltimore Life Insurance Co., Four Mile Dr. & Northway Road, 
WiUiamsport; would like December graduates with an interest in a career in in- 
surance, contact Jack Derfler at 326-2661 to take a career profile inventory for 
determining rating for work with their company. 
APPLICATIONS 

Susquehanna Room, students wanted for part-time, in Susquehanna Room, 
days or nights. Get apphcations at the persOiTnel office. 



VALUABLE COUPON! 



rmEE PlIIAll 



I Buy any size Little Caesars 

IOrigineil round pizza at regular 
price, get tlie identical pizza 
■ FREE \«rfth this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GUNT PLAZA 

327-8600 



SI 



!) 



W.A.C.C. itndenU utc 
•ddltloiiil 10% ODl; with 
itidnl I.D. iid tUs ad. 



One coupon per customer CanY out only. Al participating locations. 



Cillo's ^ 

College 
Corner 

PHONE M 

322-1321 ^ 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 
Come on over and get 
somethin ' good to eat! 



Your favorite Subs and 
Burgers the way yon like 'em 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
and win a half sub 

Four winners ^ 
every week 
• * 

(^n for Breakfast 
HOURS • Mon. Ibni Thurs. 
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 




College receives jet engine 



■■■ Continued from Page I 

Ind. and former WTI student David M. 
Shaffer, who serves as supervisor of ex- 
perimental assembly and inspection at 
the company, recalled seeing the type of 
engine his employer was seeking to add 
to its collection at the school. 

This sununer, while visiting his 
mother, who still resides in 
Williamsport, Shaffer contacted Robert 
L. Norton, College instructor of avia- 
tion, about the engine. 

Shaffer explained his company's 
desire to acquire the engine and sug- 
gested a trade. 

An agreement was worked out and 
the exchange, benefitting^tb parties, 
was made. 

"We helped them out and they 
helped us out," said Norton of the 
trade. 

"The engine we received is used 
and non-operational, but it is still cur- 
rent and is something we can use for in- 
structional purposes," Norton con- 
tinued. 

"It's about half the size of the old 



one and it saves space, and we certainly 
need space down here (in Aviation]. 

"The old one was of no benefit to us 
and the new one is; so the trade was 
very benefical," Norton added. 

Agribusiness class 
visits turkey farm 

With the Thanksgiving and 
Christmas holidays nearing, 
agribusiness students visited a turkey 
farm in New Columbia on Nov. ?. 

During the time of their visit at the 
farm, operated by Richard Kling, 2,000 
birds were shipped for processing. 

Kling buys the turkeys, nearly 
32,000 a year, when they are just a few 
weeks old from Empire Kosher, Inc. 
He reaises them until maturity and re- . 
sells them to Empire, which handles the 
processing and selling to retail outlets. 

According to Jim George, director 
of agribusiness at the College's Allen- 
wood facility, Kling has a "no lose" 
situation and nets a profit of about $3 
per bird. 



SOMETIMES IT TAKES 
AN ARMY TO PAY BACK 
YOUR COLLEGE LOAN. 

Paying back your college loan can be a long, 
uphill battle. But the Army's Loan Repayment 
Program makes it easy 

Each year you serve as a soldier, the Army will 
reduce your college debt by Va or $1,500, whichever 
amount is greater. So after serving just 3 years, your 
college loan will be completely paid off. 

You're eligible for this program with a National 
Direct Student Loan or a Guaranteed Student Loan 
or a Federally Insured Student Loan made after 
October 1, 1975. And the loan can't be in default. 

And just because you've left college, don't think 
you'll stop learning in the Army Our skill training 
offers a wealth of valuable high-tech, career-oriented 
skills. Call your local Army Recruiter to find out more. 



ARMYBEALLYOUCAN BE. 



^ACC 



A fio^f 



POTLIGHT 

Toesdiy, D«. 3. 1»85 • Vol. 21, No.l4 • 4 Pi|e» Wlfflimiport Aim Commonlly CoUeft • WlUitnuport, P». 17701 

Steering committee members announced 



The membership of the College-wide 
Goveroance System has been com- 
pleted, according to Dr. Robert G. 
Bowers, executive assistant for internal 
affairs and coordinator of the project. 

The members represent different 
areas within the College. They are : 

Representing faculty are Mrs. 
Marilyn G. Bodnar, Ubrarian; Mrs. 
Nancy C. Bowers, instructor, 
mathematics; Lamont E. Butters, 
associate professor, civil technology; 
Phillip D. Landers, associate professor, 
business administration; James E. 



Logue, associate professor, English; 
James C. Pivirotto,. associate professor, 
forest technology; James E. Temple, in- 
structor, electrical. 

Representing College administra- 
tion are: Dr. Robert G. Bowers, ex- 
ecutive assistant for internal affairs; and 
Dr. Jeanette L. Eraser, dean of educa- 
tional research, planning and evalua- 
tion. 

Representing long range plann- 
ing/division directors is Dr. Daniel J. 
Doyle, division director, mtergrated 
studies division and chair, long range 
planning. 




Advertising Art itDdenli hive bun dnwiig ikiilli, Uie ibovt dnwing (dtliU) wu done b; 
KcTii R. Will, (ram Middkbnrg. Pitrick D. Moipb;, tsibtani profcswr of idfertUng lit, 
old, "SkoUs we u Idetl nibject (or (etching (onn, (he pliner idictDre, (he local Tihie, ud 
(he hiddcncc of light. There wu no ijiibollim ln(endcd-(hc itndenU m ln(en( on cap(nriig 
(he irt ud no( (he moibldK; fdnc." 

Decorating contest slated 

Plans are being made for the Multi-Cultural Society's annual Hohday 
Cheer Decorating Contest, which is open to all students, faculty and staff. 

Those wishing to enter the contest should inform the Society at either exten- 
sions 763 or 307. 

Complete decorating rules are available from Maryann R. Lampman, in- 
structor of reading, in Room 157, Lifelong Education Center(LEC) or at the 
College recreation office. Room A137, LEC. 

Decorating must be completed by 4 p.m. Dec. 10, and removed by 3 p.m., 
Dec. 13. Judging will be held on Dec. 11. 



Representing academic affairs is R. 
Dean Foster, director of developmental 
studies and ACT 101. 

Representing administrative affairs 
is Carl L. Chistiansen, director of com- 
puter services. 

Representing the College profes- 
sional/technical staff is Robert J. 
Slothus, coordinator of radiography. 

Mrs. Marian E. Blackburn, 
secretary to the director of lifelong 
education, will represent the classified 
staff. 

Robert A. Floyd, plumber, will 
represent the College service staff. 

Gregory S. Lange, SGA president 
will act as student representative. 

Dr. Bowers stated that because of a 
tie in the faculty category, a sixth facul- 
ty member was added to the committee. 
Therefore, he stated, a final committee 
member representing student affairs will 
be added to preserve committee 
balance, and total odd number member- 



ship, as to ensure constituent represen- 
tation." 

He added that the percentage of 
returns on elections "was excellent." 
Seventy-two percent returned ballots for 
faculty members, 90 percent returned 
ballots for classified staff, and 89 per- 
cent returned ballots for CoUege APT 
staff, he said. 

According to Dr. Bowers, the 
College-wide Government System will 
address the policies and procedures con- 
cerning College's mission, goals and ob- 
jectives, how the College operates on a 
daily basis. 

He stated that the committee will 
be responsible for reviewing and con- 
dinating this process. Among the issues 
to be analyzed and resolved by the com- 
mittee are purpose, procedures, 
membership, organization, meetings, 
committees, functions and authority. 

The committee will oieel at least 
once before (he Chrislnias holiday. 



Christmas play scheduled 
At College in December 

"The Best Christmas Ever," a play by Barbara Robinson, will be presented 
by the Williamsport Players at the Academic Center auditorium Dec. 13-14, at 
7:30 p.m. and on Dec. 15 at 2 p.m. For ticket information call Ext. 763. 

The play, which lasts about an hour and a half, centers around the 
hilarious efforts of Bob and Grace Bradley, who are up to their ears in trouble 
with what may be the meanest, nastiest, most awful kids in the world, the Herd- 
mans, to tell the true story of what Christmas is all about. 

Cast members include Lisa Byler(Grace Bradley), Tracy Allen Zinck(Ralph 
Herdman), Pat ConwayO^Roy Herdman), Eric Nacy(Claude Herdman), 
Nathan Thompson(OUie Herdman), Sarah Beltz(lmogene Herdman), Michelle 
Sitton(Gladys Herdman). 

Andrea Fremiotti(Elmer), Ryan Keifer(Hobie), Brion White(David), Diane 
Conway(Mrs. Armstrong), Diane Gailit(Mrs. McCarthy), Margie Boyer(Mrs. 
Slocum), Lmelle Stabker Stabler(Mrs. Clark), Diana Nielsen(Mrs. Qawsing), 
Matt Knecht(CharUe), and Jessica Berthold(Beth). 

Bonnie Katz is director, Mary Wasaluski, assistant director. Bill Smith, 
producer and Linelle Stabler, music director. 

Katz is past president and currently serves as vice president of the 
Williamsport Players. Among her accomphshments are having performed in 
many local state productions and directmg "The Creature Creeps", in October 
1984. She also has hosted several local cable television productions. 

Wasaluski has been a prominent figure in local threatre productions, most 
recently making an appearance in the Harmony Theatre productions of "Guys 
and Dolls." 

Smith is producing for local stage for the first time. Involved m 
WiUiamsport events for a number of years. Smith created "Frosty's Christmas 
Parade" for the downtown association and coordinated the 1985 Susquehanna 
Boom Festival Parade, producing the production number "The Big Clown 
Balloons" which started the parade. 

Smith's proudest personal achievement was re-introducing giant balloons to 
the Boom Festival. He is co-chairman of the 1986 Boom Parade. 



2aSP0TUGHTOTiieid«>, Dec. 3, IMS 

Whaddya' say...? 

Photos and interviews by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. 

The Question: if you were allowed to ask the president of the 
Soviet Union one question, what would that be? 





Scott D. Stenger, broad- 
casting student from 
Chambersburg, "Why are you 
so against the Star Wars pro- 
gram?" 



Joan M. Staver, human ser- 
vice student from Wiiliamsport, 
"We seem to be having a com- 
munications gap, what's the pro- 
blem?" 





Daniel E. Martuccio, broad- Ja^^^s G. Heck, broad- 
casting student trom Galeton, casting student from Kane, 
"Would you be willing to grant "Why can't we be friends?" 

an interview with WWAS?" 




Lyie A. Wagner, graphic 
Bethany Hecht, intergrated arts student from Millvlile, "Why 
studies from Wiiliamsport, is your country such a police 
"What do you think the Practical state, where citizens need travel 
future of both our countries will permits to go from one province 
be?" to another?" " 

Financial aid seminars set 

Several Financial Aid Seminars are scheduled for this week and next, accor- 
ding to Donald S. Shade, director of financial aid. 

The seminars. Shade stated, are designed to help students plan their 
finances for the Spring 1986 semester, regarding tuition, books, and other costs, 
and are scheduled to meet in Room B107 of the Lifelong Education Center dur- 
ing the following times: 

Wednesday, 3-4 p.m. 
Thursday, 5:30-6:30 p.m. 
Friday, 9:30-10:30 p.m. 
Next Monday, Dec. 9, 12:30-1:30 p.m. 
Next Tuesday, Dec. 10, 10:30-11:30 p.m. 
Shade stated, "Students with particular questions or problems should 
make a point to attend one of the seminars. They should be aware that while in 
some cases they are already receiving as much financial aid as possible, addi- 
tional financial aid may be available to them— supplemental PHEAA grants for 
instance, and student loans, if they haven't already borrowed the maximum 
amount available to them." 



about by conflicts vxith gang members, 
women and drugs. 

Much is lett (or the viewer to sup- 
posedly l<now. but there's no way the 
audience can l<now. 

Action is slow for extended 
periods of time and the climax is 
mediocre as Estevez goes away angry, 
wrecks his car and Is arrested. 

In my opinion, Ttiat Was Then, 
This is Now is an average movie that i 
didn't fully enjoy, i expected more ac- 



Estevez movie reviewed 

By LyIe A. Wagner, of the SPOTLIGHT staff 

Emiiio Estevez, both wrote the 
screen play and starred in the movie 
That Was Then. This is Now But, get- 
ting the audience to understand his piot 
is, at times, difficult because of the lack 
of foliow through. 

Important issues appear 
throughout the film and are intenwoven 
in a round about way but, are never in- 
dividually completely covered. 

There is the friendship of two high 
school buddies who are drifting apart 
due to changes in Ideals, brought tion. 

l/l/a//cer comments 

on U.S., Soviet summit 

Dr. Thomas J.E. Walker associate professor of history, 
polital science and sociology who has expertise in the field of 
U.S./Soviet relations (masters degree in Russian political history 
and Ph.D. in U.S. political history) commented on the recent sum- 
mit meeting between President Ronald Reagan and Soviet 
leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. 

Walker stated, "If there is a positive result it is that a 
dialogue has been initiated. It is better to discuss the arms race 
than to continue it in silence. ..on the other hand perticipants did 
not come to terms on any of the major issues such as human 
rights, Afghanistan, U.S. role in Central America, the Cruise 
missiles in Europe or the Soviet SS 20's, aimed at Europe in the 
Ukraine." 

Dr. Walker added that much of the accord accomplished 
was promulgated during the pre summit summiry and not the ac- 
tual meeting of Gorbachev and Reagan... in any event. Walker 
went on "dialogue is important because it affords first hand 
knowledge of the other side, a knowledge that has mostly 
heretofore been based on speculation from some fairly baised 
sources. 

It is therefore necessary for each side to develope more ac- 
curate knowledge of each other, that Is, the American people 
should develop an understanding of how the Soviets view the 
world and the Soviets should have some type of understanding of 
America's perception of global relations. In this way future 
leaders can bring to future summits a more knowledgeable 
perspective of each which will only serve to better facilitate the 
dialogue. 

Collins does it again 
On HoJacketRequired 

Music Review by Kathy L. 
Cobb, of the SPOTLIGHT staff. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Tuudiy, Ok. 3, lass - Vol. M, No. 14 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday 
morning of ttie academic year, except for Col- 
lege vacations, by lournallsm and other In- 
terested students of The Wiiliamsport Area Com- 
munity College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center. 1005 
W. Third St., Wiiliamsport, Pa. 17701. 
Telephone: (717) 328-3781, Extension 221. 



Phil Collins' No Jacl<et 
flequ/fec((Atlanlic Records) is a 
musical collage of fervent beats and 
genuine Collins ballads. 

Collins seems to have been bitten 
by the dance bug— an inevitability 
since his association with Phillip Bailey 
("Easy Lover") and the brass section of 
the jazz/pop band Earth, Wind and Fire. 
Likable tunes with a sure beat and 
easy-lo-understand lyrics appear on 
this LP-"Who Said I 

Would, ""Sussudio," and "Only You 
and I Know" demonstate Collins' ability 
to change musical moods. 

Collins appears to have set aside 
the heavy-handed drumming technique oye.staft Armt.UBa E. Sechat.sporfs Reporter 
other LP's particularly 



Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or of those whose names accom- 
pany Items. Opinions do not reflect official opi- 
nion of the Institution. 



THE STAFF 

Wanna F Brown, Managing Editor; Sandra L. 
Musgrave.fd/tor/a/ Page Editor: LeRoy S. Whit- 
mire, Photography Editor; Kathy L, Cobb. Ad- 
ministrative Attairs Editor: Kelly S Herrold, Stu- 
dent Aflairs Reporter: Cynthia E.A. Hartranft, 
Advertising Manager: LyIe A. Wagner, Protor; 
Kelly S. Herrold, Student Affairs Reporter: Cyn- 
thia E A, Hartranft, Advertising Manager; LyIe A. 
Wagner, Production Coordinator :T\tnoVf}y F. 
Neldlg. PMT Darkroom Technician; Michael A. 



found 

noticeable in "tn the Air Tonight" (Face 
Value, Atlantic) and "I Don't Care 
Anymore"(He//o, / Must Be Going, 
Atlantic), for a slicker, more danceable 
beat. He makes the transition easily— 
his talent is unmistakable. No Jacket 
Required is a pop essay in the tradi- 
tional Collins" style. 



REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Catherine A. Hannon, Joel J. Mader, Donna 
L. Trimble. Acting adviser: James D. 
Carpenter 



CONTRIBUTING ASSOCIATES 

Mike Hoover, Sean O'Mealy. Glenn S, Mit- 
chell. Donna R. Qavitt. Diana C. VanFleet, Mary 



Mike's Musings 



SPOTUGHTaTinila;, Dec. 3, I»J5d3 



7:30 a.m.- My alarm clock sounded. 1 turned it off and reached for 
a cigarette. A voice in my head said "Hey, this is the Great American 
Smokeout day. Remember?" I reluctantly put my cigarettes down. 

7:35 a.m.-My "Quit Tips" paper said I should hide all ashtrays. 
That left me off the hook. I didn't own any ashtrays. 

7:40 a.m. -I threw out all the empty bottles and cans in my place. 

7:45 a.m.-My "Quit Tips" paper said to pass up coffee and alcohol. 
What, no coffee?. 

8:45 a.m.-I arrived at school, my eyes half opened. 

9 a.m.-I tried not to lapse into a coma as I nodded my way through 
my first class. 

9:50 a.m.-I positioned myself next to my favorite WACC butt recep- 
tacle for old time's sake and out of habit. I pulled out my "Quit Tips" 
sheet. It said to tell everyone you're quitting for the day. 

9:55 a.m.-A friend of mine stopped and asked me why I wasn't 
smoking as usual. I told him I was going smokeless for the day. "Ha" 
be scoffed, "you'll never make it, not in a mllUon years." I resisted the 
urge to lunge at his throat and tear up my "Quit Tips" sheet. 

10:10 a.m.-I couldn't concentrate. I experienced what could only be 
described as minor hot flashes. 

1 1 a.m.-I walked into the Typewriting Lab. "Good morning Mike," 
the teacher said. "What's that supposed to mean?" I snapped. It occurred 
to me that I was starting to become edgy. 

11:10 a.m.- 1 had an overwhehning urge to chew out the guy next to 
me for typing too loudly. I reached for my handy "Quit Tips" paper. It - 
said to take a deep breath, hold it for ten seconds and release it slowly. I 
tried it, but I still felt edgy. I took another, even deeper, breath. I still felt 
edgy, so I tried it again. And again. And again. Still no good. And again. 
And again. And again. And again. And again. 

1 1 : 12 a.m.-I came to. The students standing around me asked me if 
I was alright. I told them I was fine, that I was just missing a friend. 

2:50 p.m. -I made it through the school day and only had to scream 
"Does anybody have any gum?" once. 

3:10 p.m.-I drove home, mumbling "jerk" to everyone I passed and 
yelling "maniac" to everyone who passed me. 

4 p.m.-I arrived at my girlfriend's place. She was busy cleaning her 
bedroom. I pulled a book out of my backpack and started to study in the 
living room. The urge to smoke was great. 

4:30 p.m.-I stood up and walked to the kitchen sink for a glass of 
water. I spied a pack of cigarettes that I had mlstakingly left there the day 
before. Making sure no one was watching me, I pulled a cigarette slowly 
from the pack. It felt good in my sweaty fingers. My eyes widened and my 
mouth opened. I rolled it around in my fingertips for a while and then 
slowly raised it to my lips. I took some deep puffs on the unUt cigarette, 
fantasizing about how wonderful the real thing would be. I reach into my 
pocket and pulled out a lighter. I raised the lighter to the cigarette, an- 
ticipating the joy I was about to receive. 

"How's your homework coming?" my girlfriend yelled from the 
bedroom. I then heard her footsteps coming down the hallway. I snapped 
out of my trance and quickly hid the cigarettes behind the toaster. "Just 
fine," I said, while sitting back down. She entered the room and looked at 
my sad face sympathetically. "Ob poor baby, let me take your mind off of 
smoking for a while," she said. Now that's what I call the buddy system. 

10:30 p.m.-Back at home, I tried to get some sleep. 

11 p.m.-I tossed. 

12 a.m.-I turned. 

1 a.m.-I fell into a deep sleep. I dreamed I was in the front row of a 
beautiful Broadway theatre. I was watching a Rockettes-type revue, but all 
the girls in the line had huge cigarette packs over their bodies Uke in the old 

'Old Gold' commercials, only they were all wearing my brand. The one 
with the nicest legs leaned over and said, "How would you like to see me 
after the show, big boy." I nodded excitedly. I headed for the stage door 
after the show, where I met a bouncer who looked like Hulk Hogan. He 
wouldn't let me in. "But, I want my cigarettes," I whined. "No, you 
can't have your cigarettes," he said meanly. "I want my cigarettes, I want 
my cigarettes," I screamed. "Hey, shut up in there, I'm trying to sleep," 
came a voice from the next room. 

2 a.m.-I tossed. 
4 a.m.-I turned. 

7:30 a.m.-My alarm clock sounded. I turned it off and reached for a 
cigarette. A voice in my head said "Hey, you just made it through a day 
without smoking. Why don't you go for two?" "Smoke it! You put your 
day in," said another voice. 



Continued on Page 5 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Qean, well-heated rooms available w/shower and kiuhen. 
Newly remodeled, Across from WACC. 
$575 /semester, all utilities included. 

Call 323-3663, or inquire at: Barry's Sub Shop at 234 Park St. 
[Opposite east parking lot) 
ALSO: 3 bedroom apartment for rent. 



I 



■ H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h h i 

FREE PIIIA! 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 



I Buy etny size Little Caesars 

■ Original round pizza at regular 
price, get the identical pizza 
■ FREE with this coupon. 

m One coupon per customer. Cany out only At participating locations, h 



as ) 



W.A.C.C. ilndeoli uvc 
iddldonl 10% only with 
■ladnl I.D. ind this id. 




BENSON 



Off! mini, ^ 
ntn market 



Corner of 3rcl and Maynard Sts. 

OQOO^>OOOOOOOQOO^<->Vrf^^>OOOOOQQO< 



4nSP0TLICHTnTneidiT. Dk. 3, 1M5 

Susquehanna Room 

TicmU), Dec. 3 
UDck 

Rigatoni in meal sauce, Italian bread, 
$2.19; chicken nuggeu, pouio & vegeuble; 
$2.89 

Soup 
Beef barley, tomato rice 

Diner 
Ground round steak, potato 4 vegetable, 
$2.59; sauerbraten spaetzle 4 vegetable, $2.89 
SMdwkba 
Grilled cheese, $.79 turkey hoagie, $1.79. 

Wedaesdiy, Dec. 4 
Lsnck 

Kielbassi, pierogi potato pancakes, $2.39; 
filled lirlon, gravy, potato 4 vegelable, $2.39 
Sonp 
Cream of mushroom, mineslone 

Dinner 
Roast pork, gravy, potato 4 vegetable, 
$2.S9; imposter lobster, potato 4 vegetable, 
$2.39 

Sudwtckct 
Chili dog, $.89; ham 4 egg, $1.59; western 
egg, $1.35. 

Returns requested 
by Media Center 

Films and video tapes either rented 
or borrowed from the Media Center 
should be used and returned by the 
dates indicated on the film receipt form 
which accompanies the program. 

According to Center personnel, 
delays in returns cause inconvenience to 
the schools and organizations waiting 
for these programs. If a program can 
not be returned by the date requested, 
the Media Center (Ext. 219) should be 
contacted. 

The Center, located on the second 
floor of the Learning Resources Center, 
also noted that anyone with either tape 
recorders or audio-visual equipment in 
their possession that is not being used 
should return it for redistribution as 
soon as possible. 



Menu for the Week 

TkimU;, Dec. S 
UBck 

Spanish rice, pork cudet, Italian bread, 
$2.39 

Glazed ham, fruit sauce, potato 4 vegetable, 
$2.39 

Soup 
French onion, new england clam chowder 

Diuer 
Roast chicken, (1/4) filling, potato 4 
vegetable, $2.59; enchiladas, potato 4 
vegetable, $2.59 

Saadwkbci 
Chicken salad in pila, $1.59; fried 
balogna/cheese, $1.29; bacon club, $1.79 . 

Friday, Dec. 6 
Lsocb 

Mulligan stew, potato and vegetable, 
$2.59; fried clam strips, potato 4 vegetable, 
$2.59 

Soup 
Chicken noodle, cream of potato 

Sudwkhci 
Com beef on rye, $1.39; taco, $.99; fish 
sandwich, $1.29. 



Silver-colored pin with rhinestone. 
If round call Eit. 404. Reward offered. 



UA Tickets 
On ule Dec. 3, $2.50 each. Pick 
np in tbe Recreation Center during 
Iheir hours. Good for one year in all 
eastern UA Movie Theatres. Sponsored 
by SGA. 



CUIo's 

College 
Corner 

1100 W. Third SI. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Phone 322-1321 

HOURS • Moo. thru Ttaurs. 
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Open for Breakfast 

* * * 
Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 

Four winners 
every week 

• • • 

Your favorite Subs and 

Burgers tbe way you like 'em 

Come on over and gel 
somelhin' good to eal! 



BULLETIN BOARD | 

For Weeic of Tuesday, Dec. 3 through Sunday, Dec. 8. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau...noon, today, Dec. 3, Room B107, Lifelong Education 
Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous...? to 8 p.m., tomorrow, Dec. 4, Room B107, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

Student Government Association. ..Executive committee, 4 p.m., today, Dec. 
3, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

New York City Bus Trips.. .Dec. 7 and 14. Bus leaves LRC parking lot at 6 
a.m. to St. Patrick's Cathedral and leaves St. Patrick's Cathedral at 9 p.m. 

Dovmhill Skiing at Ski Sawmill. ..tomorrow Dec. 4. Bus leaves LRC parking 
lot at 5 p.m. 

Ice Skating.. .Sunbuiy Conununity Center, Thursday, Dec. S, Bus leaves LRC 
carking lot at 5:30 p.m. 

SNOW Christmas Party... Lysock View Nursing Home, tomorrow, Dec. 4, 
from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. 

SNOW Blood Pressure Screening... the student nurses will be taking blood 
pressures on Wednesday, Dec. 4 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. ingthe Academic Center 
Lounge, B107 LEC, Automotive Technology and thelood pressures on Wednesday, 
Dec. 4 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Academic Center Lounge, BI07 LEC, 
Automotive Technology and tbe LRC hallway. 

VOLLEYBALL MARATH0N...Dec. 6 and 7 from 8 p.m. to 4 a.m., in the 
gym. Registration fee is $1 per team. Anyone interested should sign up at the Rec. 
Center, contact any Alpha Omega Fellowship member, or call the Rec. Center 
(Ext. 763). 

Employment Opportunities 

APPUCATIONS 

Susquehanna Room, students wanted foi part-time, in Susquehanna Room, 
days or nights. Get applications at the personnel office. 

■1 



^D 



Fast, Free Deliver; 



LIMITED DELIVERY AREA 

1303 Washington Blvd. 
Phone: 322-2022 



$2.00 oft any 16-inch, 3-llen] or more pizza 
One Coupon Per Piaa 

Expires Dec. S, 1985. 
ICustomer pays sales lax anil bollle deposlll 



Open for Lunch 
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Snnday - Thnrsday 
11:00 a.m. - 2 a.m. Friday 4 Salnrday 




ANIMAL 

HOUSE 



There's a sheep in our 
shop, a dog at our door 
and a lion lounging — 
wherever he wants. 




WACC Bookstore 
LRC Building 



^ACC ARCHiVEs 




POTLIGHT-^^f 



Muds;, OkX IMS • Vol. 11, No. 15' 12 Pifa WUHiiiiuwrt An* Coannltj CoUep • WHUtuiMrt, Pi. 17701 



stuff wishes all a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New Year! 



!ii»j;&iis>Jc&ii»%ii&^;B^^^ 




Word proctning atadcBt Wiadi K. Alkey receives free blood pressure check from I.P.N. Ann 
Prepinonikl lut Wedneidi; In the Acidemic Center stndenl lonnge. jSPOTUGHT pholo/ 

Triskaidekaphobia: 
13 unlucky for you? 

Have you got triskaidekaphobia? 

What looks like alphabet soup and sounds like the next fatal disease to 
strike fear into the hearts of people throughout the worid is just a word for the 
unnatural fear of the number 13. 

And when 13 falls on a Friday, as it will in four days, some people would 
simply rather lock themselves in their bedroom and stay alone than venture out 
and risk any catastrophe. 

The number 13 has been fraught with a grim, tragic background and is 
traditionally linked in the minds of many to the occult and evil. The 13th card 
in the mystical Tarot deck is the death card, depicting a black-shrouded skeleton 
swinging a scythe and mowing a crop of human heads. 

Beware of swinging scythes! 

Superstition also has been aaorded the number due to the 13 people pre- 
sent at the Last Supper, and many buildings even in this day and age have no 
13th floor. 

Avoiding black cats, walking around ladders and being careful with mirrors 
are just a few of the precautions taken by those who choose to venture outside on 
Friday the 13th. 

The paranoia surrounding Fridays evolve from the facts that Presidents 
Abraham Lincohi, James McKinley and John Kennedy were all assassinated on 
Fridays, as was Indian leader Mohandas Gandi. Friday was long called 
"Hangman's Day" in England because it was the most common day criminals 
were put to death. 

The Lusitania, a British steam ship, was sunk off the Irish coast on a Friday 
in 1915 and "Black Friday" marked the stock market panic of 1873 in America. 

According to a story in the WiUiamsport Sun-Gazette, a nationwide survey 
of leading companies revealed that more firings— 38 percent of all employee 
terminations— take place on Fridays. Bosses are not without their worries on 
Fridays, however, as the day is also the highest for employee absenteeism, 
lateness and poor productivity. 

Friday the 13th is not an unlucky day, or thought to be an unlucky day for 
everyone, as in the case of acting Spotlight adviser James D. Carpenter and his 
wife, Charis. Carpenter is a graduate of the College's journalism program. 

T*B of the Carpenter's three children were bom on Friday the 13th— three 
year4B<t Keith in August of 1982, and one year-old Leanne in July of 1984. 



Student tuition survey 
results are announced 

A recent survey of 400 of the College's full and part-time students 
(255 first year students, 132 second year and 13 part-time) concerning in- 
creases in tuition resulted in the following results: 

-88 percent were aware of the tuition increase. 

-84 percent s^d the tuition increase was unreasonable. 

-69 percent will have problems paying tuition bills for the coming spr- 
ing semester. 

-97 percent of those who will have trouble paying their tuition next 
semester will have those problems because of the increase. 

-43 percent have changed their minds about continuing their educa- 
tion at the College because of the increase. 

The comments expressed most often were: Why is this college so ex- 
pensive? If I had known that tuition was going to be so high I never would 
have come here. Second year students stated that they feel trapped and 
would transfer if they were not in theii third semester. Others expressed 
concern about the high expenses at the bookstore and cafeteria. 

According to Dana E. Strayer, Electrical Technician student from 
Summerhill, "The survey's ultimate goal is to try to get the tuition 
lowered." 

"Tuition rates were set some time ago. In the fall term there was a 20 
percent reduction. We are now looking for as many ways as we can to re- 
tain and/or reduce costs in the future," stated Dr. William J. Martin, dean 
of student services. 

"This is certainly among the major two or three goals we are working 
on now," said Martin. "We realize we must develop the most competitive 
tuition possible for our students. At this time, the College is not in a posi- 
tion to lower costs. If we could, we would. We are, however, as commit- 
ted to lower tuition rates as our students," Dr. Martin added. 



Friday 



Spolhght Administrative Affairs Editor Kathy L. Cobb was also bom on a 
ay the 13th, and noted, "It's obviously a lucky day, or I wouldn't be here." 



Exchange conference update 

While at the International Exchange Conference Nov. 20-21, Dr Thomas J. 
E. Walker, associate professor of history, government, and sociology, sohdified 
the College's effort to bring international students here. 

At the conference there was an exchange of information with emphasis be- 
ing on Latin America. In the past, the majority of exchange students who have 
come to our College have also been from Latin American countries. 

Walker is currendy contacting Latin American embassies and universities, 
particularly those vrith technical programs and those with American Studies pro- 
grams. 

Walker stated, "The conference was a great help in providing knowledge of 
these available resources, all of which can be adapted to programs here at the 
College. 

Center's misuse lamanted 

Students using the Recreation Center are reminded to place trash in the pro- 
per receptacles and extinquish cigarettes in the cigarette ums. Also, anyone 
found to have intentionally broken cue sticks will be charges $10 replacement 
fee. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities, a 
few people are abusing the facility and equipment making the area unattractive 
and unpleasant for all. 



2DSP0TLIGHTnM»idtr, Dec.*, 1M5 



Whaddya' 



say. 



The Question: Since the end 
of the semester is just around 
the corner, what are your pians 
for Christmas break? 

John S. Henry, eiectronics stu- 
Photos and interviews by LeRoy dent from Bedford, "Visit my 
S. WhitmireJr. grandmother." 




Mike's Musings 




Theresa A. Hagenbuch, 
dental hygiene student from 

Danville, "Relax, do some ski- 
ing, visit friends and spend 

some time with my family." 
- %i 



John M. Good III, teleconn- 
munlcatlons engineering student 
trom \NiHiamsport, "Do some 
hunting and relax." 




Shere L. Vietz, business Michael A. Dye, advertising 

management student from art student from Mechanicsburg, 

Bloomsburg, "Go home and "Go home, do some painting 

work." and relax." 




Laura E. Erdley, accounting Donald J. Balliet, computer 

studentfromReedsvilie, "Spend science student from Milton 
It with family and friends." "Spend it with my family" 



by Mike J. Hoover, computer sc/ence studertt from Selir}sgrove 

Terrorist Lone Survivor In Suicide Bombing 

Terrorists Malm, Kill, and Rape Nuns 

(not necessarily in that order). 

Terrorists Hijack Egyptian Pyramid 

Look familiar? These kind of headlines are all too com- 
mon today. Now I'm not here to pass judgment on these bar- 
baric, death wishing bozos, because their intentions may be 
good, but we would ail have to admit that they are becoming 
a pain In the neck. In my opinion, our government is doing 
ail it can to squelch these troublemakers, but I believe that 
the most effective way to end terrorism lies not in the 
government's hands, but in the news media's hands. 

Terrorism is a group's way of making known to the 
world their particular problems. Nobody cares of course, but 
they don't know that. Due to extensive media coverage, a 
terroristic act has become sort of an international podium, 
therefore encouraging these lunatics to commit even more 
violent acts. This can be stopped if the news media follows 
my plan carefully. 

Here is my plan; 

-Ignore the jerks. There, now that isn't too complicated 
is it? 

-The news media shall never try to find out who com- 
mitted a terroristic act (shieks, muslems, PLOs, IRAs, PTAs, 
etc). 

-The news media shall never try to find out what a ter- 
rorist group's demands or problems are. 

-The news media shall limit any news story about a ter- 
roristic act to one paragraph and shall place it on the obituary 
page (remember, we won't know who they are or what they 
want). 

-The news media shall give terrorists no TV coverage 
until they are lying In a bullet riddled heap of corpses. 

Did you ever notice how terrorists always call 
newspapers to claim responsibility for their abominable ac- 
tions? The next time a terrorist calls and says, "This is a 
spokesman for the Islamic Palestine Front and we just blew 
up our own embassy today by accident," the person who 
answered the phone should say, "What? You guys? You 
have to be joking. I know for a fact that it couldn't have been 
you wimps. Get out of town!" This would have them scrat- 
ching their turbans for a while. 

I think it is reasonable to assume that if the spotlight was 
taken away from these yo-yos, their acts would mean 
nothing. But how do we get the news media to censure 
itself when they are so fond of throwing freedom of press 
and the public's right to know in our faces. Well, if you join 
my cause, we'll blow-up the New York Times's office 
building for starters. That will get their attention. We'll then 
hold the editor as a hostage to make our demands known 
Of course, we will have to call in other news media to cover 
all of this. Get the picture? 

Happy Holidays to all and I'll see you next semester 
(hopefully anyway). 

SPOTLIQHT 
Monday, 0«c. 9, 1986 - Vol. 21, No. 15 
Ttie SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning o( the academic year, ex- 
cept tor College vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The 
Williamsporl Area Community College, 

Otiice: Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W. Third St., Wllllamsport, Pa. 
17701, Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Extension 221. 



THE STAFF 

Wanna F Brown, Managing Editor: Sandra L, Musgrave, Editorial Page Editor: 
LeRoy S Whitmire Jr , Pr^otography Editor: Kathy L Cobb, Administrative Atlairs 
Editor: Keiiy S Herrold, Student Allatrs Reporter :Cynth\a E, A Hartrantt, Advertis- 
ing Director: Lyie A. Wagner, Production Coordinator: Timothy F, Neidig 
Photomechanical Darkroom Technician: Michael A. Dye, Stall Artist: Usa E 
Secnst, Sports Reporter 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Catherine A. Hannon, Di-Anne I Hess, Joel J. Mader. Donna L. Trimble. 
Acting adviser: James D, Carpenter 



CONTRIBUTING ASSOCIATES 

Mike Hoover. Sean O'Meaiy. Donna R, Qavltt. Diana C, VanFleet. Mary Williams. 



Students eligible 
for boards 

Eight members of the 1985 
graduating class in Radiography were 
eligible to talce the American Registry of 
Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) board 
examination. 

The eight students who passed are 
Ms. Terry Brobst, Robert Glossner, 
Terry Harvey, Ms. Jill James, Ms. 
Karen Nikalus, Christopher Schuler, 
Ms. Glenda Smith, and Ms. Lori Steer. 

Ms. Brobst is working in a hospital 
in New York; Glossner is going for his 
bachelor's degree in Radiological 
Technology in Bloomsburg; Harvey is 
working at the EvangeUcal Hospital in 
Lewisburg; and Ms. Nikalus works in a 
Florida hospital. 

Ms. Smith and Ms. Steer are work- 
ing at the Williamsport Hospital. 

Schuler and Ms. James are seeking 
employment. 

Veterans 
must schedule 

All veterans students receiving 
educational benefits who attended the 
Fall 1985 semester and will be attending 
the Spring semester, are reminded to 
turn in a copy of your official schedule 
(Spring 86) during the first week of 
class. 

Students must turn in their 
schedules to Mrs. Barbara Mundorff, 
veteran specialist for the College in the 
Financial Aid office, Room 201. 

Phi Beta Lainbda's(PBL) ban- 
ner, reported musing from tlieir 
"Feed a Friend"collection table 
No?. 25, has not yet be 
recovered. 

A $25 reward Is being of- 
fered for the return of the ban- 
ner. 




ySPOTUGHT pholo by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jrj. 

WWAS ProfiJe. ..Craig L. Hower 

News Director of WWAS, Craig L. Hower, is a Williamsport native and 
was employed at the WBRE-TV 28 Williamsport office during the summer for 
his internship. 

Hower stressed,"! think there is a real need for campus news. People need 
to be informed on a daily basis of the events and happenings on campus." 

Hower also noted that there are plans for an editorial panel on controversial 
issues, to be broadcasted on WWAS. 

WWAS news times are: campus oriented news 8 a.m., noon and 4 p.m. and 
state and national news 8 a.m., noon and 6 p.m. 

Ride wanted 
Ride needed to Bloomsburg University 
(commoting), willing to pay gu fire. 
If interested cail CoUege Ext. 2M, isit 
for Selena Slelts. 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Clean, well-heated rooms available w/shower and kitchen. 
Newly remodeled. Across from WACC. 
$575 /semester, all utilities included. 
Call 323-3663, or inquire at: Barry's Sub Shop at 234 Park St. 
(Opposite east parking lot] 
ALSO: 3 bedroom apartment for rent. 



SPOniGHTDMonihy, D«.9, 1»85d3 

Steering Committee 
meeting scheduled 

The first meeting for the Steering 
Committee for the College-wide Gover- 
nance System has been scheduled accor- 
ding to Dr. Robert G. Bowers, executive 
assistant for internal affairs. 

Dr. Bowers stated that the commit- 
tee will meet tomorrow, at 9:45 a.m. in 
the conference room located on the se- 
cond floor of the Lifelong Education 
Center. 

He added that a seventeenth 
member has been added to the commit- 
tee, due to a tie in faculty elections held 
recently, and in order to maintain com- 
mittee balance. Dr. Bowers stated that 
Donald S. Shade, director of financial 
aid, will represent Student Affairs on 
the committee. 

According to Dr. Bowers, the com- 
mittee will be responsible for reviewing 
and coordinating the Governance 
System, which will address College 
policies and procedures. 

Students in co-op 

There are eight people on co-op in 
the Business and Computer Technology 
Division, according to Mrs. EUzabeth 
A. Dahlgren, co-op coordinator for the 
division. 

The co-op provides practical work 
experience, introduces the students to 
people who work in their field, offers 
students the chance to earn momney, 
and assures that the programs are effec- 
tive in training students for employ- 
ment. 

Anyone interested in obtaining 
credit to take place of their electives this 
semester or next should contact Mrs. 
Dahlgren, Room 12 in the Academic 
Center, or call Ext. 496. 

All transcripts will be 
held if all fines are not 
paid or arrangements 
made by TODAY, Dec. 
9, according to Cecil C. 
Cryder, chief of security. 



p H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h ■ w 

rniEE PiiiAr 

I Buy any size Little Caesars 

■ Original round pizza at regular 
price, get the identical pizza 
■ FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 






W.A.C.C. itadcnli un 
•dditioul 10% oal; with 
itidnl I.D. ud (Us id. 



One coupon per customer. Carry out only At participating locations 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

Hoars: Mon.-Sal. II i.m. lo 9 p.m. Closed Sunday 

Monday Regular Sub Whole $1.60 

Tuesday Meatball Whole $1.75 

Wednesday Turkey Whole $1.40 

DAILY SPECIALS Thursday Ham Whole $1.80 

Friday Tuna Whole $1.70 

Saturday Cheese Steak Whole $2.50 
•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" $4 whole $2.10 half 




W.A.C.C. HORIZONS 



A Child's Christmas 



byLyleA Wagner 



A child's tip-toeings 

echo in the hall, 

an electric clock 

hums at one in the morning. 



A... giggle... muffled 
by little hands over a tiny mouth, 
as a Christmas tree ball 
shatters on the floor. 



Creeping to the liviogroom doorway 
a plank. ..creaks under my foot. 
I stop.. .deep breathing 
is brought to my ears. 



A child fearing discovery 
hides behind a Christmas tree. 
A tree surrounded by gifts, 
hiding with a heart that's beating fast. 



Entering the secret place, 
I foolishly expose my presence, 
by treading upon a fallen piece 
of wrapping paper. 



Now a head peeks out 
forfeiting that hiding place. 
While a click is heard, 
sounding out a camera lens. 




How Santa Claus came to be 



by Joel J. Mader 



Brightly a flash explodes, 
as a face turns white as snow. 
A smile precedes a cry of rejoice., 
"SANTA CLAUS.. .was here!!!" 



Saint Nicholas was a Roman 
Catholic saint whose name come to be 
synonymous with Santa Claus. 

In the fourth century, aaording to 
tradition, there lived a kindly Saint 
Nicholas who worked many miracles 
and was greatly beloved. 

From early times feasts were held 
in honor of him in Europe. Because his 



feasts day was celebrated shortly before 
the Christmas season, he aquired a new 
character, that of Santa Claus, beloved 
by children. 

It is an American custom that San- 
ta only brings presents to good little 
boys and girls. The children usually 
leave a snack of cookies and milk on the 
table for Santal Claus or carrots for his 
reindeer. 



^^'^'^^^<B>^^<&>0mi&i^00^0mt$)i^0mm<gs>mt&i<§)m^^00m!$)ff)000^0t^^0 



W.A.C.C. HORlZONSDMowhT. Dec. i, IMSa2 



A Christmas, After All 



by Kathy L Cobb 



Christmas had always been 
our favorite famiiy holiday. Col- 
orful yuletide memories danced 
through my thoughts: Dad settl- 
ing the shiny star on the top of 
the tree; Mom and Jeannine 
baking yummy cookies and 
decorating them with festive 
holiday confections. And I 
would hang the mistletoe; of 
course I'd be the first to trap Dad 
underneath for a holiday kiss. 
But now. ..now... 

Shaking my head as the 
tears sprang to my eyes, I 
brought myself back to the pre- 
sent. Happy giggles came from 
the playroom. The other children 
were too young to miss the 
warmth of a family holiday; they 
had all ready become accustom- 
ed to Christmas at the foster 
home. But I was seventeen! I 
knew the difference. ..I knew that 
it would never be the same 
again. 

My family had been return- 
ing from a short drive to 
McDonald's in the thick 
November snow when a truck 
suddenly jackknifed and crash- 
ed into our car. Dad and Jean- 
nine were killed instantly, and 
Mom was still alive, but barely. I 
remember sitting beside her bed 
In the intensive care unit. ..I had 
been holding her hand when she 
slipped away. It all happened 
nearly a month ago, but it seem- 
ed like yesterday. I was alone 
now, alone at a time when I 
needed my family the 
most.. .Christmas. 

Drying my tears, I went into 
the playroom. It was Christmas 
Eve, and the children were 
decorating the room with holly 
and trimming the tree. I stood 
near the doorway, sadly wat- 
ching the children as they en- 
joyed themselves. My attention 
was drawn to a little girl with 
blonde ponytails who was climb- 
ing a ladder in the center of the 
room. When I saw that she was 
trying to hang mistletoe, I jerked 
my eyes away and looked out of 




the window. A moment later, I 
felt someone tug at my sleeve. I 
looked down into the little girl's 
big blue eyes. 

"Excuse me," she said shy- 
ly. "You are bigger than I am. 
Could you please hang this for 
me?" 

The tears were coming 
again, and I nearly turned away. 
But something about the little girl 
stopped me. I knelt before her. 

"What's your name?" I ask- 
ed. 

"I'm Lisa. Who are you? 
Will you help me?" She shyly 
cast her eyes to the floor. 

"I'm Nora. Sure I'll help you. 
Come on." We went to the 
center of the room, and taking 
the mistletoe from Lisa, I slowly 
and hesitantly climbed the lad- 
der. With shaking hands, I hung 
the decoration on a small hook 
and descended. By the time I 
reached the floor, tears were 
streaming down my face. 

"Why are you crying? Are 
you sad?" Lisa innocently ask- 
ed. I looked at her puzzled face 
through a cloud of emotions and 
ran from the room. 

I forced myself to go to sup- 
per that night, and I found myself 
avoiding the little girl with blonde 
hair. During the course of din- 
ner, Mrs. Fenston, our foster 
parent, called for our atten- 
tion. 

"Children, tonight before 
retiring to our beds, we're going 
to have a small holiday celebra- 
tion in the playroom. To 
develop a happy Christmas at- 
titude in ail of us, cookies and 
milk will be served, and we will 
sing carols around the tree. I 
hope that you will all attend and 
have a good time." 

After dinner, I retired to the 
darkest corner of the playroom. 
Sitting in a big armchair and 
looking out the window at the 
falling snow, I thought about the 
foster home and the upcoming 
holiday. I had no intention of at- 
tending the party that night. I 



wanted to go to my room and 
read a book instead. I couldn't 
bear to be a part of all the cheer- 
fulness when I felt so empty in- 
side. 

I had been alone with my 
thoughts for about twenty 
minutes when several small 
children came into the room. 
They sat at the opposite end of 
the room and watched televi- 
sion. For a moment, I observed 
the decorations. In the dim light 
cast from the television, the 
Christmas tree seemed almost 
magical: the streams of tinsel 
sparkled when the tiniest breeze 
ruffled them, and the lights 
twinkled blue, green, red and 
yellow. Mesmerized by the 
glistening beauty of the tree, I 
was unaware of my surroun- 
dings. 

A small hand touched my 
shoulder. Funny, I should have 
been startled, but I merely turn- 
ed to see who was standing next 
to me. It was as if I already 
knew... little blonde-haired Lisa 
was also caught in the magic. 
She stood, a hand on my 
shoulder, staring at the tree with 
tears emerging from her eyes. 
Touched, I suddenly knew why I 
hadn't been able to turn away 
from her that afternoon; she was 
also suffering, and she was very 
afraid. From her blue eyes 
emerged the very same emo- 
tions I was feeling, and I knew 
that I was the one who had to be 
strong; I had to be a friend to this 
small child who was crying out 
for help. 

"Lisa? Lisa, do you want to 
talk about it?" She turned 
frightened eyes on me and near- 
ly ran as I had run from her 
earlier. I put a gentle hand on 
her arm. 

"Please don't go. I want to 
be your friend. I want to help." 
My eyes filled with tears as Lisa 
gave in and sat on the stool 
before my chair. I waited for her 
to overcome her fright and talk 
to me. 

Hesitantly, she began, her 
tiny voice trembling, "I'm 
scared, Nora. I'm scared." 

"Of what, honey?" I took 
her hand. The poor child was 
shivering. 

"I. ..I don't want to be by 
myself." She began to cry, and 
my own face was wet with tears. 

My voice was low. "I'm 
alone, too." 



A quiet moment passed. All we 
heard was the sound of the 
television. I looked into Lisa's 
eyes. 

"Want to tell me about it?" 

"My mommy's in Heaven," 
she sobbed. I waited for her to 
finish. "I never had a daddy. 
And I'm all by myself. Why are 
you here? Your're a big girl." 

I cast my eyes to the floor. 
"My parents and sister went to 
Heaven, too. I'm not old enough 
to go out and live alone. How 
old are you, Lisa?" 

"I'm seven." She flung her 
arms about my neck and began 
to sob. I held her close as I wat- 
ched the other children stream 
into the room and gather around 
the tree. 

As I held her, i said, 
"Everything will be all right, Lisa, 
you'll see." Across the room, 
several hesitant voices began to 
sing melancholy refrains of 
"Silent Night." I squeezed my 
eyes tightly closed to prevent 
more tears from escaping. 

Lisa whispered in my ear, "I 
like you, Nora. Would you be 
my friend?" And then, "Merry 
Christmas." 

I held her tightly and 
answered, "Merry Christmas, 
Lisa, Merry Christmas." 




JdW.A.C.C. HORIZONSDMoDdar. Dec. 9, IMS 




Photo by Donna L. Trimble 




The Life of a Sweat Suit 



by Mikel L. Harpster 

When Ralph first became a sweat suit, he knew that it was going to be a 
smelly, disgusting job. So Ralph made sure that when he was put on the store 
rack, his best side was showing. When that wrestler picked Ralph up and decid- 
ed to buy him, Ralph knew it was time to prepare for a long, rough life. The first 
thing the wrestler did when he got Ralph home was to rip off the sticker price. 
That was Ralph's initiation into his new Ufe as a wrestler's sweat suit. 

The wrestler didn't waste any time in breaking Ralph in. He quickly put 
Ralph on and stretched the waist band so far that Ralph thought his threads were 
about to pop. Once the wrestler got Ralph on, they headed right out the door 
and went down to the gym. Ralph knew that he was about to be put to the test, 
so he prepared himself for whatever might He ahead. 

When they got to the gym, the wrestler wasted no time m getting started. 
He began by running m place, and as he was domg this, he started sweating up a 
storm. Ralph could hardly believe it. He never knew people could get so hot, or 
sweat so much. The more the wrestler exercised, the more drenched in sweat 
Ralph became. But it wasn't just getting soaked that was getting to Ralph. He 
also had a hard time getting used to the smell of human perspiration. It was a 
scent Uke nothing Ralph had ever experienced before. Nothing in the depart- 
ment store had ever smelled like that. 

Finally a whistle blew and Ralph's wrestler stopped what he was doing, said 
so long to the other wrestlers and headed out of the gym. It wasn't until the 
wrestler got outside that Ralph reaUzed he hadn't even checked out the other 
sweat suits on the wresding team. As they left the gym that day, Ralph was on 
top of the worid. He knew that he had passed the test that every sweat suit has 
to go through— the first day on the job. 



W.A.C.C. HORIZONSDMoadir, Dec. », 1M5[l4 



/ WANT FOR 
CHRISTMAS 



I want for Christmas; 
The jay of seeing you; 
To know you LOVE ME! 
A peaceful moment... 
before a fireplace 
burning low and warm... 

1 want for Christmas; 
A place... in your heart and mind; 
Kisses under the missle-toe; 
Assurance... that next year 

once more... 

Christmas we shall share... 

I want for Christmas; 
To hold you in my arms; 
Time to sit and talk and laugh; 
For you to be happy, safe, proud; 

and to have ever\/thing... 
your little heart desires.:.^ 

I -want for Christmas; 
A smile on your precious face; 
Christmas Dinner with our friends; 
To make you mine... 

until the very end 
of time. . . 




Lyle A. Wagner 



Origin of Christmas 




Christmas is the most important 
festival of the Christian Church, observ- 
ed annually on Dec. 25, in memory of 
the birth of Christ. 

The time when the festival was first 
observed is not certain. 



Roman Cathohc, Greek, Anglican 
and Lutheran churches, hold special 
reUgious services for Cristmas day. n 
homes in all Christian countries, 
Christmas is a day of household 
festivities, family reunions and joy for 
the children. The widespread practice 
of presentin gifts at Christmas time has 
probably some connection with the gifts 
presented to the Child Jesus by the three 
Wise Men. 



Within the past few years many 
towns and cities have adopted the 
custom of setting up community 
Christmas trees in centrally located 
places, and holding pubUc gatherings at 
which carols and hymns are sung. 



by Joel J. Mader 



5dW.A.C.C. HORIZONSOMoiAi;, D«c. », IMS 




Reflections, photo by Di-Anne I. Hess 



The Club 



By Thomas C. Connor, Jr. 

Uptown bright lights ii- 
lumlnate the streets, colored 
signs flash bright colors all night 
long. Large expensive cars 
drive back and forth carrying 
well dressed people to fancy 
restaurants, shopping nnalls and 
night clubs. However, not so far 
away things are quite different. 

The alley Is dark. The 
street lights had burned out, or 
were broken long ago, but no 
one has ever bothered to 
replace them. As you walk past 
the buildings, debris blows 
around your ankles. These are 
not mansions of the rich, or the 
nice houses of the middle class. 
These are the low budget hous- 
ing projects built of cement 
block, with broken windows and 
rusty fire escapes. The only or- 
namentation they have is the 
spray paint graffiti that adorns 
the walls. 

There are no flashy lights 
here, only here and there light 
shines from a curtainless win- 
dow from a naked bulb inside. 
There are no night clubs here, 
nor shopping malls, nor fancy 
restaurants. Only small family- 
owned shops and huge, ugly, 
decfepit warehouses. 



The small shops are closed 
this time of night with their doors 
locked and iron gates pulled 
across the front. It is never quiet 
here. All night long you can 
hear car horns blowing, dogs 
barking, babies crying, people 
shouting, sirens wailing, winos 
singing, music blaring from afar, 
but It Is never, never quiet. 

At the back of the dead-end 
alley, past the wino sprawled on 
the sidewalk and past the group 
of stiletto wielding youths wear- 
ing motorcycle jackets, you will 
find "Sly's Place." 

The hand-painted sign 
reading "Sly's Place" swings in 
the wind on a pole above the 
door out of the reach of vandals. 
Inside the dim light and thick 
smoke brings visibility to about 
ten feet. The smell of stale 
smoke and old spilled alcohol 
mingles with the aroma of food 
cooking in the kitchen to assault 
the nose. 

The pinball machines in the 
corner are probably the same 
ones that were there when it 
opened twenty-some years ago. 
The jukebox is always playing 
old classic rock by Lynyrd 
Skynyrd, Led Zeppelin, Janis 
Joplin, The Doors, and even 
older music from the sixties by 



The Wanderers, The Kingsmen, 
and Chuck Berry. 

The large wooden knife 
-scarred tables have been writ- 
ten on and stained by spilled 
drinks. The chairs are metal and 
very heavy(hard to pick up and 
break over someone's head.) 
The walls are almost covered 
with beer and liquor signs. One 
wall is nearly entirely covered 
by a huge Jack Daniel's poster, 
and the neon beer signs on the 
walls provide more than half the 
light in the whole place. 

The bar along the back wall 
is In better shape than the rest of 
the place. It is here you will find 
Sly himself. 

Sly Is fifty-some years old; 
he acts like he is twenty and 
doesn't look a day over 130. His 
thin frame carries a large 
paunch, and his long white hair 
matches his bristling white 
beard. He constantly wears a 
black leather vest and black 
chaffeur's cap which sharply 
contrasts with his white hair and 
pale skin. The cap conceals his 
bald spot, and the vest conceals 
a stainless steel .357 
magnum(one cannot be toe 
careful in a neighborhood Hke 



this.) He claims he has never 
had to draw his gun, and I 
believe him. Sly is not a 
nickname Idly given. He's witty 
and has a smooth tongue. He 
cpn tell you to go to hell, and, by 
the time he's done talking, you 
can't wait to get there. Many a 
fight I've seen him stop by talk- 
ing the combatants out of it, 
which isn't an easy thing to do. 

Behind Sly's bar is the back 
room, a place that lives up to its 
bad reputation. A pool table sits 
in the center of the room under a 
single naked bulb. Chairs are 
scattered around the room 
haphazardly, and an old ashtray 
In the corner Is burled under 
millions of cigarette butts. 1 
don't think It has ever been emp- 
tied. In the wall across from the 
kitchen door Is the back door, 
often used for hasty exits. It 
opens to a narrow walkway that 
winds between buildings to the 
main street. 

"Sly's Place" is in my 
neighborhood, and, unless you 
were with someone, you 
wouldn't be welcome there. As 
a matter of fact, it would be far 
healthier to steer clear of the 
area all together. It is not a nice 
place, but I can feel comfortable 
there, at "Sly's Place." 



W.A.C.C. HORIZONSaMoadar, Dec. % lW5a6 




. Or you might 

' ■ not live to regret it. The facts 

speak for themselves. Drinking and driving are a deadly 

combination . . . one that can turn any holiday into a disaster. Saying no to 

that New Year's drink can mean the difference between life and death. 

Plan your holiday celebrating the smart way. Don't drink and then 

drive... and see that others are in shape to get behind 

the wheel. Make this a safe and happy New Year. 

A Holiday Reminder 
From the SPOTLIGHT Staff 



4DSPOTLIGHTDMoDd«r, Dec.», 1W5 




nCHARD I. EVANS, JR. AND PAUL W. GOLFEDER 

Adviser, officer attend meetings 



Paul W. Goldfeder, associate pro- 
fessor of business, state and local PBL 
adviser and Richard L. Evans, Jr., an 
accounting student, from Phillipsburg 
and the College's PBL vice-president, 
attended both the State Executive Coun- 
cil Meeting last Tuesday, Dec. 3,at the 
Embers Convention Center, Carlisle 
and the PBL meeting at Shippensburg 
Univesity where Goldfeder spoke. 

Goldfeder and Evans, went to 
Carlisle, for the Executive Council 
meeting, where the Council met with the 
conference committee, where plans for 
the 15 annual PA state leadership con- 
fence were revealed. 

The conference will be held April 
11-13,1986 at the Embers Convention 
Center, Carlisle. 

Other items discussed at the 
meeting were: plans for the second an- 
nual winter formal dinner and dance, to 
be attended by PBL members from 
Mansfield, Penn State University, Ship- 
pensburg University, Lock Haven State 



University, and the College, to be held Center 



February 15,16, 1986 at the 
Williamsport Sheraton Motor Inn. 

The next Executive Council 
meeting will be at the home of Dr. Larry 
Fiber, PBL State Executive Secretary, 
on Jan. 11,1986. Goldfeder, also, 
brought the club up-to-date on social 
events on state and local level. 

On the local level, the College's 
PBL, held a raffle as a fund raiser for 
the fraternity's state leadership con- 
ference and other conferences concern- 
ing the Real World and How to Cope 
Situations in the Business Community. 

Raffle winners were Brenda Robin- 
son, first place, $50; Neil Barker, se- 
cond place, $30; Lauri Cero, third 
place, $20. 

Their 11 annual Christmas party, 
for members, business and computer 
technologies faculty, and PBL guests 
will be held this Wednesday, Dec. 11. 

It will be held in Thomas C. 
Leitzel's office. Room 301, Academic 



^ 



Ful. Fret Dtlivn; 



I LIMITED DELIVERY AREA 



1303 Wishinglon Blvd. 
PhoDc: 322-2022 



$2,00 off to; 16-iiicli, 3-ilem or more pizn 

Ont Coupon Per Piiza 

Expires Dec. IS, 1985. 

fCiiSlomer pays sales lax and bottle deposilj 



Open for Lnnch 
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Sonda; - Tbgrsday 
11:00 a.m. - 2 a.m. Frida; i Saturday 



•\ 



Open 7 o.m. to midnight: 

Monday thru Friday 

(^)tn Saturday 1 p.m. to 3 a.m. 




BARRYS 

Joy Barry says: Wt won't cook a boiler before iU time. 

^^pan Brooklyn Style Eatery 

A Unique Eating Experience 
Best Breakfast in Town 
•ARCADE and Pool Table 
•Daily Specials 



Just across from ) 



the new east parking lot 



Employment 
I Opportunities 

Brubaker Tool & Front Center 
Streets, Millersburg has an opening for 
a person to do time and motion studies 
within plant, full-time, permanent. Ap- 
plicant must have mechanical ability 
with a Business Management, or related 
degree. Send a resume to the attention 
of Mrs. Delores England. 

Dr. William Pettitt, Huff & Puff, 
Embryo Transplant Division, Vinen- 
town, NJ 08088 has an opening for an 
embryo technician. Applicant needs an 
associate degree with several courses in 
microscopy. Send a resume or for more 
information call Dr. Pettitt at (609) 
859-260. 

General accounting in Mifflioburg 
area. Knowledge of microcomputers is 
helpful. Salary around $12,000. 
Would be working for a service com- 
pany. Contact Robert Lyons at (717) 
966-3101. Start as soon as possible. 

Accounting, temporary, part-time 
IRS Taxpayer Assisatant representative 
from Jan. 1 to April 15. About 
$6.0p/hr. Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday- 8:30- 4:30 (24 hours a week). 
Help taxpayers prepare 1040E2, 1040 
(simple) Will require training in 
Philadelphia for one week (early Jan.). 
Go to IRS office. Federal Building, se- 
cond floor and ask for form 171. No 
phone calls. 

Time sheets due 

College work study students must 
turn in time sheets for this week to Mrs. 
Barbara Mundorff, veteran specialist, in 
the Financial Aid office. Room 201, 
Academic Center, by noon this Friday, 
Dec. 13. 

Checks will be mailed next Friday, 
Dec. 20. Students will not be paid until 
the middle of January if the sheets are 
not turned in by this date. 

Co-ed VoUeybaU 

Today, Monday, Dec. 9 

7 p.m. Net Busters vs. MCB 

Slammers vs. RAM 

8:15 p.m. Bums vs. WACC Staff 

Euphoria vs. Straub Greenies 




STUDENT HOUSING 

Fnrnished Rooms 

Singles, Doubles, 

Apartments avaOable 

ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 

Showers and kitchen 
facilities 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine Ave. 

and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 

Both within one |1] 
block of WACC 
Phone 326-6536 



David Cunningham is the new Stn- 
denl Government AMOciation(SGA) 
advisor for the Spring 1986 semester. 
He is also the College Activities Assis- 
tant in the Recreation Center. His 
hours for the Spring semester are 11 
a.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday and 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Fri- 
day. 

Philosophy II 
addition sought 

Students interested in the addition 
of a second philosphy course "Ethical 
Issues in Philosophy" to the College 
curriculm should sign a petition 
available in the Phi Beta Lambda office 
in the basement of the Academic 
Center. . .. „ „ .,, 

According to Harry G. Smith, a 
third semester general studies student 
from Bodines, the course was offered 
last year, but is not available next 
semester, having been dropped due to a« 
Reported lack of mterest. 

Smith is one of several students try- 
ing to have the next semester, having 
been dropped due to a reported lack of 
interest. 

Smith is one of several students try- 
ing to have the course reinstated. 

HOLIDAY DANCE 



Tuesday, Dec. 10, 1985 

Time: 8 to 11 p.m. 
PlacetSusquehanna Room 

Sponsored by SGA 

Benefits 
'FEED-A-FRIEND' 

Admission with 
validated I.D. 

$1.00 or a can of food. 

I ALL! Money & food will go 

to the 

Feed-a-friend program. 



SPOTUGHTaMoidir. Dec.t. IMJoS 



SPOTLIGHT%.. 

Dr. John F. Thompson 



B; Kathjr L. Cobb 
Of (he SPOTLIGHT Stiff 



"The biggest chaUenge the College faces is maintaining a balance so that we 
are able to give the student the maximum amount of education for the job 
market in a two year time frame. ..the proper skills and competences so students 
are equipped and able to meet technological challenges," stated Dr. John F. 
Thompson, associate academic dean. 

In the past five years. Dr. Thompson has held several positions at the Col- 
lege, particularly associate dean of secondary education, and associate dean of 
technology programming. Since then, both positions have been combined. As 
associate academic dean, he is now responsible for all credit programming on 
campus, and for supervising various academic division directors, including 
secondary programs. 

Concerning the College, Dr. Thompson commented, "I think we're on the 
cutting edge of technology because of some of our new programming 
initiatives... We are unique in our commitment to hands-on education and the 
use of state-of-the-art, industrial-sized equipment." He added, "Our commit- 
ment to keeping pace with technology is important, as well as keeping our faculty 
current with technological changes. We are very fortunate to have a very 
dedicated faculty." 

Prior to working at the College, Dr. Thompson was employed as director of 
the Bradford County VoTech School in Towanda. He also held the position of 
assistant principal with the Northeast Bradford High School in Rome. In addi- 
tion, he has taught agriculture and science at the secondary level. 

A native of Sayre, he holds several academic degrees, all obtained from 
Pennsylvania institutions: a bachelor's degree in science and agriculture from 
Delaware Valley College in Doylestown; a master's degree in educational ad- 
ministration from the University of Scranton; and a doctorate in vocational 
education from the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Thompson completed 
the requirements for his doctorate last month, and received his doctorate on 
Nov. 21. 

A resident of Loyalsock Township, Dr. Thompson enjoys outdoor activities 
such as camping and outdoor athletics. He has two children, Frank, 12 and 
Aline, 9. 



''...students are equipped and able to 
meet technological challenges" 




Dr. John F. nomfioa.[SPOTLIGHT photo by Lisa E. SecristJ. 



The SGA would like input of what type of movies you would like to see next semester 
Please check the appropriate box: 



THE- „ 
■■■«■■■ ■■k.iririii 

416 River Avenue 



'Gilt Wnppini .Pickiiiof SuppUa 

•PKkiilag •Electronic Mill 

•Auwerint StnUx .Word Proctniit 

Hllftwnp Snppllti •Term Ptpcn 

PHONE 327-1766 




322-5455 

Free Delivery 



You haven't had a Hoagie 
unlit you've had a 

HOBY Llmltwl Aru • Minimum Ordw M.OO 

^ooooooooooooo* 



DOSPOTUGHTaMoidir, Dcc.9, IM5 

Susquehanna Room Menu for tbe Week 

The Susquehanna Room's menu for the week starting today, Monday, Dec. 
9, is presented as furnished by the Susquehanna Room management. 
Diil; BreiUul 

Scraiiil)led eggs, 59"; hash browns, 55'; home fries, 55'; pancakes, $1.29; French loasl, 99"; 
waffles, 99'; sausage, 79" 

DiilT Siltd Bar 

Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomatoes, onions, broccoli, auliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple but- 
ter, jello, potato salad, com relish 



Moida;, Dec. 9 

UDCt 

Tuna platter.potato & vegetable, S2.29, 
Swedish meatballs over rice S2.39. 
Soap 
Daily homemade soups will be served. 

DIoDer 
Stuffed cabbage, potato & vegetable, J2.59 
Baked hamloaf, potato vegetable, t 2.49 
Saidwlcbn 
The daily foods will be served, 
guarter pounder, $1.25; Cheeseburger, $1.35; 
pizza, $.55; pizza w/lopping, $.70; Am hoagie, 
$1.49; meatloaf sandwich, $1.29; turkey sand- 
wich, $1.59; tuna salad, $1.59; french fries, 
$.55 

TDeidiy, Dec. 10 
LoDcb 
Spaghetti and sausage, Italian bread, 
$2.19; breaded pork chops potato & vegetable; 
$2.59 

Soap 
Oiooer 
Roast beef, potato & vegetable, 
$2.89; Fish & chips,$2.39 



Wedaewhy, Dec. 11 
Loocb 

Sweet & sour meatball over rice, $2.39; 
stuffed shells, small salad bar .Italian bread $2.89 
Soop 
Dlnaer 
Baked Salisbury steak, potato & vegetable, 
$2.39; chicken i ribs, potato & vegetable, 
52.«9 „ ., 

Tbandiy, Dec. 12 
Loocb 
Fried clams, potato & vegetable$2.59 
Filled meatloaf,polalo 4 vegetable, $2.59 
Diooer 
Swiss steak, potato & vegetable, $2.89 
Manicotti & small salad bar, Italian 
bread,$2.89 

Friday, Dec. U 
Loocb 

Chicken nuggets, potato and vegetable, 
$2.59; macaroni & cheese,vegetable, $2.19 

Tbe SaMiDehtoDi Room will opeo regoltr 
boon Ibia week lod will b« opeo Dec. l(i,l98S 
lo Dec. 20, from 7i.m. to 2p.m. 



Cillo's ^ 

College 
Corner 

PHONE M. 

322-1321 
1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 

Come on over and gel 
somethin ' good lo eat! 



Voor fiTorite Subs and 
Burgers the way you like 'em 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
and win a half sub 

Four winners -^ 
every week 

Open for Breakfast 

HOURS • Mon. thru Thurs. 

7:30 a.m. lo 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 a.m. lo 4 p.m. 



SOMETIMES rr TAKES 
AN ARMY TO PAY BACK 
YOUR COLLEGE LOAN. 

Paying back your college loan can be a long, 
uphill battle. But the Army's Loan Repayment 
Program makes it easy. 

Each year you serve as a soldier, the Army will 
reduce your college debt by 'A or $1,500, whichever 
amount is greater. So after serving just 3 years, your 
college loan will be completely paid off. 

You're eligible for this program with a National 
Direct Student Loan or a Guaranteed Student Loan 
or a Federally Insured Student Loan made after 
October 1, 1975. And the loan can't be in default. 

And just because you've left college, don't think 
you'll stop learning in the Army Our skill training 
offers a wealth of valuable high-tech, career-oriented 
skills. Call your local Army Recruiter to find out more. 



ARMY. BE AU YOU CAN BE. 



Le Jeune Chef Menas This Week 

Le Jeune Chef luncheons wil be served this week on Wednesday, and Thurs- 
day, and Friday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Wedieidar, Dec. 11 

Soup du jour: Italian wedding soup. 75' cup, 80* bowl. 

Light Luncheon: Smoked chicken, apple and walnut salad, cup of soup, roll and beverage, 
U.75. 

Spedal for the day: Country style meatloaf, dutchcss potatoes, broccoli with herb butter, 
rolls and beverage, $3.25. 

Desserts: Frosty frozen fruit salad , 75'; black forest lorte, 80', assorted pies, 75'. 
Tkondiy, Dec. 12 

Soup du jour: French cheese soup, 75* cup, 80' bowl. 

Light Luncheon: Mexican tortilla saandwich, cup of soup, rolls and beverage, $2.75. 

Special for the day: Fried chicken, oven-fried potato, asparagus with butter sauce, roll and 
beverage, $3.50. 

Desserts: Cannoli ice cream, 80', ; crepes with chocolate sauce, 80'; snowballs, 75' and 
assorted pies, 75'. 

Fridi;, Dec. 13 

Soup du jour: Onioo soup gratinee, 75' cup, 80' bowl. 

Light luncheon: Stir fried chicken salad with szechwan noodles, cup of soup, rolls and 
beverage, $2.75. 

Special for the day: Roast tenderloin with lyonnaise sauce, fettucine alberto, bnissels 
sprouts, rolls and beverage, $3.25. 

Desserts: Poacb pear in lemon sauce with raspberry swirls, 80*, hot fudge sundae, 75', 
assorted pies. 75'. 

Speakers being sought ScholaFShipS 

Twn niifllifipH nponlp are Heine ^ 



Two quaUfied people are being 
sought to present the topics "Marketing 
Your Long-Term Care Facility" and 
"Financial Management for the Health 
Related Professions" at the Center for 
Lifelong Education. 

Each topic will be the subject of a 
one-day seminar to be held at the Col- 
lege in the Spring 1986 semester. 

For additional information contact 
Grant Martin, Ext. 775. 



Scholarships are being offered to 
female students, preferably heads of 
households pursuing training for entry 
or re-entry mto the labor market by 
Soroptimist International of 
Williamsport. 

Applications are available in the 
Financial Aid Office, Room 210 of the 
Academic Center. Application deadline 
is next Sunday, Dec. 15. 






The Williamsport Area Community College 



The Williamsport Players 



.^^ 




t The Best 
^ Christmas 
Pageant 
Ever 



by Barbara Robinson 



A SPECIAL MATIMEE PERFORMANCE 
DECEMBER 15, 1985 AT 2 P.M. 



in the ACADEMIC CENTER AUDITORIUM at 

The Williamsport Area Community College 



■ ALL SEATS RESERVED 



5400— general public 
FREE with validated Witliamspofl Area Community riollege s 



WACC 



ARCHIVES 



s 



M Monib;, Ju. 13, 19M • Vol. 21. No. 16 • 32 Ptfa 

WUIliiDiiiorl Aret CoDniiiltr CoUcte • Wmitmiiwrt, Pi. 17701 



POTLIGHT 




Time to Hil Ibe Books Again 



2aSPOTUGBTOMonli;, Jti. 13, 1W< 



Create 



cleaIlne^^s. 
A litter bit 
at a time. 




Cillo's 




College 
Corner 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Next to Academic Center) 


+ 


Phone 322-1321 




HOURS • Mod. thru Thurs. 
7:30 a.m. lo 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. lo 4 p.m. 
Open for Breakfast 




Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 




Four winners 
every week 




• • • 




Your favorite Subs and 




Burgers the way you lllie 'em 




Come on over and get 
somelhin ' good lo eat! 


-»mmmmmi^i 



The 

Student 

Government 

Association 

Office 

is in tlie 

Lifeiong 

Education 

Center 



STUDENT HOUSING 

Furnished Rooms 

Singles, Doubles, 

Apartments a¥ailable 

ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 

Showers and kitchen 
facilities 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine Ave. 

and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 

Both within one (1] 

block of WACC 

Phone 326-6536 



SPOTLIGHT 
PLANS 'GREETING' 
FOR NEW STUDENTS 

Students new to the jour- 
nalism and uiass communica- 
tions programs will be in- 
vivted to attend a get-together 
next week, according to An- 
thony N. Cillo, SPOTLIOHT 
faculty adviser. 

The get-together will be 
held in the SPOTLIGHT of- 
fice next Tuesday afemoon at 
4. 

During that time, the ad- 
viser said, continuing staff 
members and students new to 
the program and to the Col- 
lege will be able to "meet and 
share ideas". 

Student chairperson for 
the get-together anangements 
is Lisa E. Secrist. 



SPOTUGHTaMmdi;, Ju. 13. intn3 

Applications Now 
Here for Internships 
FOR Disabled Persons 

AppUcations for internships for physically disabled persons 
now are available, according to Ms. Kathryn A. Ferrence, 
counselor for special needs students. 

The internships ~ which are new ~ are being made 
available through the National Park Service and the Student 
Conservation Association, Inc. 

"Interns would be working for experience and for possible 
academic credit," stated Ms. Ferrence. 

For positions starting between May 1 and July 31, the ap- 
plications deadline is March 1. For positions starting between 
Aug. 1 and Sept. 30, the deadline is June I. 

Additional information and applications are available in 
the Career Advisement Center, Room 157, LRC. Interested 
students may contact Ms. Ferrence at College Ext. 398, or in 
the Advisement Center, Room 157, Learning Resources Center. 




4D8ranjGHTaMDi*ir, Ju. u, int 

In This Issue 

12 / Profile: Michael S. Walker 

13 / ID Cards: Update 

14 / Wood Sample Display 

16 / Food: Menues 

20 / College Trustees Appointed 

22 / This Week's Activities 

26 / Intramurals: Rules 



SPOTUGHTDMomlir, Ju. 13, ItMoS 



Ubrary hoars for the semester are Monday through Thurs- 
day, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sun- 
day hours are 2 to 9 p.m., according to Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, 
director of learning resources. 

Mrs. Hickey stressed that students should ask the librarian 
or student on duty at the desk for assistance, because the mot- 
to for the library is "The only dumb question is the one you 
don't ask." 

The library is located in the Learning Resources Center, 
LRC, next to the Advisement Center, Room 157, LRC. 



Library 

Hours 

Set for 

Semester 



Poetry 
Short Stories 


4\^ 


. Essays 


Other Original 


r, ' 


Works... 





Now Being Accepted 
By The SPOTLIGHT 

On A Regular Basis 



Please submit your 
material to a staff member 
In Room 7, Basement, 
Academic Center. 
[Do not submit your sole 
original copy; If you need 
to make copies, machines 
are available on campus 
at reasonable cost. You 
retain all rights to your 
woric.] 




GEITING MAGAZINES in order in 
the Library Iwfore tlie new semester 
started is Thomas i. Van Sant Jr., 
electronics technology student from 
SoDth Williamsport. ISPOTLIGHT photo 
by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr./ 



dnSPOTUGHTaMoKUj, Ju- 13. "•* 





CHRISTMAS 
DECORATIONS... 

Doled u winnen: (ABOVE) 
Froit; the Snowmtn goet for 
I sleigh ride in the Ubnrr 
ud wini the title of Most 
Old Fishioned in the contest 
]ndged by the Molti-Caltnral 
SocietT- IRIGHT] SinU 
Clins wishes ill i Merry 
Christmu as he hugs on the 
door of the Student Govern- 
ment Associition office ud 
etms the dtle, Merriest. 
ILEIT] WW AS. the 
College's stndent-operated 
rtdio stidon, won for Most 
Unique. 

[SPOTLIGHT photos by Don- 
na L. Trimble) 



SPOTLIGHTaMoub;, Ju. 13, imoV 




SaSrorUGHTDMoida;. Ju. U. IM* 



Robot on the Way 



Purchase of automated 
mani^facturing robot okayed 



The College Board of 
Trustees recently approved 
the purchase of a new 
automated manufacturing 
robot. 

According to Dr. George 
L. Baker, director of in- 
dustrial technology, the equip- 
ment will interface with 
machine tools in the 
automated manufacturing 
facility. 

The robot, which costs 
nearly $100,000, is being con- 
tracted from the Cincinnati 
Milacron Marketing Company 
of East Syracuse, N.Y. The 
fimding for this equipment 
will be drawn from the 
Automated Manufacturing 
with Robotic Manipulation for 
C.N.C. Turning Centers 
Grant. 

Dr. Baker expects deliver 
on or before March 31. 



According to Dr. Baker, 
the equipment consists of a 
mechanical robot and control 
unit which will be used for 
loading and unloading 
materials from machines and 
for inserting and removing 
tools from machines. 

It will be used temporari- 
ly in the Technical Trades 
Center 4 and later will be 
moved to the new Advanced 
Technology Center Automated 
Manufacturing Laboratory. 

"This robot is one of 
four that the College is plann- 
ing to acquire. Three addi- 
tional robots are expected to 
be obtained this term. 

"Of those three, one will 
be used in the cunent welding 
program and two will be used 
for automated technology in 
the new building," Dr. Baker 
said. 



Make Comment / Go Clean 

...says Susquehanna Room supervisor 

Starting today, there will be a suggestion barrel in the 
Susquehanna Room "scramble area", next to the dry cereal 
dispensers. Students are asked to make comments or sugges- 
tions and place them in the box, according to John G. 
Vilali, supervisor. 

He also said he wanted to remind students that the 
eating faciUty's rules call for patrons to "bus" their own 
tables when they have finished. That is: Take dirty dishes 
and trash to the posted areas. 

"Failure to follow the rules," the supervisor said, "will 
result in loss of privileges for use of the Susquehanna 
Room." 



CULINARY ART 

GROUP BEGINS 

DINNERS JAN. 20 

Culinary Aits students 
will begin serving quantity 
diimers in the Le Jeune Chef, 
next Jan. 20, from 5:30 to 
6:30 p.m;, according to Mrs. 
Suzann Bennett, coordinator 
of food service. 

Dinners will be served 
every Monday, Wednesday 
and Thursday during this 
semester. The meals will cost 
S4 per guest. Desserts will be 
a la carte. 

Interested persons should 
call extension 369 for reserva- 
tions. 



DA' BUS! 
DA' BUS! 

Schedule posted 
for Earth Science runs 

The bus schedule for runs 
between Main Campus (Lear- 
ning Resources Center bus 
loop) and the Earth Science 
Campus is: 
Monday throngta Friday... 

7:15 a.m. and 10:15 a.m. 
from Main to ESC. 

From ESC to Main, 9:15 
a.m. and 1:05 p.m. 
Monday, Wtdneiday, and 
Thnnday... 

From Main to ESC, 4 
p.m. 

Return from ESC, 5 p.m. 
Tnesdayi and Fridiyi... 

Leaves Main Campus bus 
loop at 3 p.m. and returns 
from ESC at 4 p.m. 



SPOTLIGHTDMoaiUT, Jh. I], IM«a9 









ABOVE: Setting ap 
stock of sweatshirts in 
the College Bookstore is 
Peggy A. Kiessling, a 
Bookstore clerk. 

RIGHT: Stocking books 
on shelves at the College 
Bookstore is Steven J. 
WaclawsU, a constrac- 
tion carpentry student 
from WUIiamsport. 
[SPOTUGHT photos by 
LeRoyS. WhilmireJr.J 




Bookstore Hours... see story, next page 



lOaSPOTLIGHTDMoiKUi. Ji». ». "« 



Book Buyin' 
Time Is Here- 
Bookstore 
Hours Listed 



The CoUege Bookstore hours for the 
first two weeks of the semester will be 8 
a.m. to 5 p.m., 6:30 to 9 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m., Friday, according to Mrs. Eleanore 
R. Holcomb, supervisor of the 
Bookstore. 

The return policy for books and 
supplies is five days with receipt. 
However, books purchased today, Jan. 
13, have a 15-day refund policy with 
receipt. 

Books must be in new condition, 
Mrs. Holcomb added. This particular 
policy applies only to books, and not 
supplies. 



fPh. 






*/. 



A O 



mi 



BOl 




.>.^ 



And where else woald yoD expect to 
And the mill drop box for all thoie let- 
ters to Sinti? Of coarse, right here in 
the display set np in the College's 
Doplicating and Mail Services Section! 
ISPOTLIGHT photo by Donna L. 
Trimble] 



...And One 
We Liked... 



SPOTUGHTDMoidir, Jn. U. imoll 



The Lycoming County 
Association for the BUnd 
(L.C.A.B.) is once again col- 
lecting used eyeglasses, hear- 
ing aids and old jewelry dur- 
ing the month of January, 
throughout the Lycoming and 
Clinton counties, according to 
a news release from the 
L.C.A.B. 

Drop boxes have been 
placed in the Health Services 
office, room 104, Bardo Gym- 
nasium by the L.C.A.B. Ad- 
ditional drop boxes, provided 
by Nfike Marchese, a long 
time member of the 
Williamsport Bureau of Fire, 
in an effort to assist the com- 
munity program, can be 
located in the SPOTLIGHT 
office, Room 7, Academic 
Center, and the Recreation 
Center office, Room A137, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

In conjunction with the 
collection, local Burger King 
restaurants are offering a 




MIKE MARCHESE 
MOTIVATES COLLECTION 



coupon good for a free ham- 
burger for each pair of 
eyeglasses donated at the drop 
off points. 

The eyeglasses and other 
collected materials will be pro- 
cessed by staff and volunteers 
of the L.C.A.B. Glasses with 
plastic frames will be shipped 
to New Jersey to "New Eyes 
for the Needy," an eye pro- 
ject, where they will be recon- 
ditioned and distributed 
throughout the world. Wire 
frames will be converted to 
cash to support the 
L.C.A.B.'s Remedial Eye 
Care Program, which assists 
low-income area residents with 
the cost of eye exams, glasses 
and ocular prostheses (glass 
eyes). 

The eyeglass collection is 
expected to net a 25 percent 
increase from 1985's collec- 
tion, in which over 11,000 
pairs were collected. The col- 
lection will continue 
throughout the year at the 
L.C.A.B. office. 

The collection is spon- 
sored by the L.C.A.B. in con- 
junction with the WiUiamsport 
Bureau of Fire, Local 763 
I.A.F.F., and two local 
Burger King restaurants. 

The eyeglass collection, 
originally begun as a county- 
wide campaign to promote the 
collection of used eyeware. for 
the prevention of blindness, 
has now expanded to provide 
services to both Clinton and 
Sullivan counties. 



Eyeglass 

Collection 

Underway 

ON Campus 



DROPOFF BOXES 

AT COLLEGE 

LOCATIONS 



1 ZaSfOTUGHTDMowli?. Jti. U, IMt 



PROFILE / Michaels. Walker 



Michael S. Walker, a graduate of the marketmg, merchandising and business manage- 
ment programs at the College, recently modeled for the "Men of Happy Valley Plus" 
calendar, designed by Diann Shaheen. 
The models were chosen from this area. 
The calendar was distributed throughout the state. 

Shaheen did marketing research and stated on PM Magazine, WNEP-TV, that she 
was very proud of what she had done. The program aired Dec. 17, 1985. 

Walker is a sales representative for a local hardware store and pursues a modeling 
career. Locally, he is the reigning Mr. Fannie until August of this year. 

He continued his education at Bloomsburg University in business administration and 
management. He is contemplating working toward his master's degree in business ad- 
ministration. 

"The College helped me establish my goals for life; the College was a good stepping 
stone for me," Walker said. 

"By working at landscaping and lawncare to pay my way through school I realized 
my goals wouldn't come easy. I had to work for them," he stated. 

Gary Chrisman, program director of WWPA radio station, and director of the "Mr. 
Fannie m the Susquehanna" contest, held at the Bourbon Street Night Club, stated, "It 
(the contest) is more fim, humorous than the Miss Fannie contest, which is more formal." 

Of Walker, Chrisman said, "(He) is an exhibitionist at heart; be is very innovative." 

i ...THE College was 

A GOOD STEPPING STONE 
FOR ME... f 



SPOTLIGHT 
Vol. 21, No. 16 / Monday, Jan. 13, 1986 
The SPOTLIGHT is published weekly on Monday mornings except for official College vacations by jour- 
nalism and other interested students. Opinions expressed are those of the staff as a whole or of individual writen 
and do not reflect official institutional opinion. Office: Room 7, basement, Academic Center. Telephone: Ext. 
221, |717| 326-3761. 



STAFF THIS ISSUE: This issue was produced by students who returned to campus prior to the scheduled sUirt of 
classes in order to produce the student newspaper and bave it available on the first day of classes. 

Staff: Wanna F. Brown, LeRoy S. Whittnire Jr., Kathy L. Cobb, Cynthia E. A. Hartranfl, Joel J. Mader, 
Lisa E. Secrist, Lyic A. Wagner, James H. Treese, Donna L. Trimble. 

Faculty adviser: Anthony N. Cillo. 



8P(mJGHTDMoi<«T, ill. 13. lW<al3 



ID PROCESSING STARTS TODAY: 
AFTER JAN. 24, THERE'S A $10 FEE 

Identification card (ID) and ID validation processing will 
be done in the Reaeation Center office, Room A137, Lifelong 
Education Center today through Friday, Jan. 24, according to 
Mrs. JoAnn Fremiotti, coordinator of Q)Uege activities. 

The hours are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Thurs- 
day, and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday. Weekend hours are 
noon to 4 p.m. 

After Jan. 24, there will be a $10 processing fee. Photo 
ID'S will be processed only on Mondays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., 
and 5 to 7 p.m., or by special appoihtment for the duration of 
the semester. 

Special sessions for evening and part-time students can be 
scheduled by calling College Ext. 763. 

There is no fee for the validation sticker, Mrs. Fremiotti 
added. 




NO SPECIAL 
CARD NEEDED 
FOR BUS RIDES 



Students are reminded 
that there is no special card 
reqmred for bus transporta- 
tion. 

Full-time students may 
show their cunent validat«l 
ID card to the city bus driver, 
according to Mrs. JoAnn 
Fremiotti, coordinator of Col- 
lege activities. 

This service is provided 
by the WiUiamsport Bureau of 
Transportation (Qty Bus). 



Beginmng today, hours 
for open gym and for the 
weight room will be 4 to 
10:00 p.m., Monday through 
Friday. 

The weight room will be 
closed Tuesday evenings from 
7 to 8:00 p.m. 

Validated ID cards are 
required for participation in 
all intramural sports, open 
gym, and the weight room. 



WoRKiN' Out? 
Gym Hours 
Posted 



Who 

Are 

You? 

Students eneoun^ed 
to carry ID cards 

Students are encouraged 
to carry their ID card at all 
times on campus, according 
to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

Students need their card 
to enter the Bardo Gym- 
nasium for intramural ac- 
tivities because the activities 
are offered only to College 
students. 

If the ID card is lost, 
students should check with the 
Security Office or the Recrea- 
tion Center, Mrs. Fremiotti 
added. 

A $10 fee will be assessed 
to replace a lost or mutilated 
card. The card is not 
transferrable and must be car- 
ried at all times. A statement 
of these requirements can be 
found on the back of every 
card. 



MoSPOTUGHTDMoBiliT. J"- »• "»* 



Wood 

Sample 

Collection 

TO BE 

Displayed 

AT Earth 

Science 

Campus 



A MontonnviUe 
mu'i collection of 
wood lamplei, contain- 
ing more tlian 800 dif- 
ferent species of trees 
common to Nortli 
America will Im on 
display at the College's 
Earth Science Campns, 
Allenwood, starting 
next Monday, Jan. 20 

WllUam Q. 
Wright, 70, a retired 
wood products 
manofactnrer. 




SPOTUGHTDMoidw, in. 13, HMD 



15 



hu been identifying, 
•IpbalMtizing and 
cataloging wood 
samples for nearly 
seven years, bnt he 
said lie wishes he'd 
have started sooner. 
While his collec- 
tion is large, he said 
there are as many as 
1,300 tree species in 
North America, and 
noted that last summer 
he viewed the massive 
collection of the U.S. 
Products Laboratory in 
Madison, WiKonsin, 
which contains over 
300,000 samples from 
throughout the world. 

Wright pointed 
out there are 58 
species of oik in 
' North America and he 
has accnmiated nearly 
all of them. He said 
that there are at least 
150 varieties of willow, 
he only has between 
35 and 40. 



Each variety of 
tree is represented by a 
1X2 inch sample abont 
one-qnarter inch thiclc. 
The tree section from 
which the sample is 
taiten must be dry for 
at least one year, for 
preservation of the tex- 
ture and grain of the 
wood. 

Using a reference 
book for identification 
of tree sections and 
sometimes traveling to 
out-of-state colleges 
and universities to 
verify a find is the 
next step Wright takes 
to research the tree's 
common geographical 
location and its com- 
mercial use, if any. 

The tree samples 
and information are 
attached to a 2X2 foot 
plywood sheet, with 
about 30 samples on 
each side, and bound 
together like the pages 
of a book. 




Using a 400-year- 
old piece of lumber 
recovered from one of 
the log boom beds 
removed from the Sus- 
qnehanna River, 
Wright fashioned the 
wood to form a large 
frame for his collec- 
tion. The frame, 
capable of holding up 
to 24 plywood sheets, 
allows the sheets to be 
turned mnch like the 
pages of a book. 

"The more dif- 
ficult samples to ob- 
tain, he said, come 
from Arizona and near 
the Mexican border. 

Wright is one of 
1,500 members of the 
Intemational Wood 
Collectors Society of 
Ohio. One club 
member's collection 
numbers over 5,000 
samples. 



16a8POTUGHTDMi>nhT, )u. 13, IWt 




Computer 
Helps Diet 
Analysis 



Courtesy report 

A sophisticated computer 
program that can "digest" 
food eaten to determine the 
diet's percentages of 25 im- 
portant nutrients now is in 
use at The WiUiamsport 
Hospital. 

The service can also be 
used by individuals on special 
diets, those who want to lose, 
gain, or maintain weight, and 
athletes who want to make 
sure they are getting the right 
amount of nutrients and 
energy-enhancing foods. 

The new Dietary Analysis 
and Assessment Service will 
be a "great aid to institutions 
such as schools, nursing 
homes, correctional institu- 
tions, and hospitals that want 
to verify that they are serving 
nutritionally balanced meals," 
explained Mrs. Joan L. 
Allure, director of dietetics at 
the hospital. 

To use the system, the 
individual or institution com- 
pletes a dietary information 
collection sheet. Usually, the 



record is kept over a three- 
day period consisting of two 
weekdays and a Saturday or 
Sunday. 

Once the information 
sheet is returned to the 
hospital, the data is analysed 
and a detailed report is 
returned to the individual or 
institution. 

The report will detail the 
amount ot the food consti- 
tuent consun:ed, the recom- 
mended intake, the departure 
from what is recommended, 
and assessment. It will also 
give a breakdown in terms of 
the basic food groups. 

Another part of the ser- 
vice for individuals involves 
completing a form about exer- 
cise and food preferences. 
Based on this information, a 
one-week or two-week menu 
will be designed by the com- 
puter. 

"This is especially helpful for 
weight reduction, weight gain, 
and athletic participation," 
Mrs. Alkire noted 



17 



Meal Plan 
Applications 
Being Taken 

Applications and renewals 
for the meal plan will be ac- 
cepted today through Friday, 
Jan. 24, from 9:30 to U a.m. 
in Room B136, Susquehanna 
Room office, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center or in the corridor 
to the Building Trades Center, 
according to John G. VitaU, 
supervisor. 

The meal plan ID cards may 
be picked up from 1:30 to 
2:30 p.m. 

He said he was asking 
students to please note the 
meal cards need special care, 
by placing it away from other 
cards with magnetic strips. 



Ski Trip 
Planned 

"A ski trip is being plan- 
ned for this Wednesday, Jan. 
15, and is sponsored by in- 
tramural sports," according 
to Margot R. Bayer, student 
activities assistant. 

The bus will depart from 
the Learning Resources Center 
bus loop at 5 p.m. and will 
return at 10 p.m. The cost 
of the trip is as follows: lift 
only, $6; lift and rentals, $13; 
and lift, rentals and lesson, 
$16. 

Pre-registration in Room 
A137, Recreation Center, 
Lifelong Education Center. 



SPOTUGHTDMouta;, Ju. 13, imD 

Le Jeune Chef Rollin' 

Student restaurant serving lunch this week 

Le Jeune Chef luncheons will be served this week on 
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Prices are available at the student restaurant located in the 
Lifelong Education Center, according to Miss Judith M. 
Patschke, instructor of quantity foods. 

Reservations may be made by calling College Ext. 244 or 
Ext. 369. 

Walk-in patrons are welcome for lunch, Miss Patschke 
said. 

The menues for each of the days are: 

Ttaii Wednesday, Jin. 15 

Soup du jour is com chowder; light luncheon is tuna salad 
in a pita, cup of soup, roll, and beverage; special of the day is 
glazed ham, baked potato, glazed carrots or buttered com, 
rolls, and beverage; desserts include cherry cheesecake, pineap- 
ple upside down cake, and assorted pies. 

This Thnndiy, Jin. 16 

Soup du jour is cream of broccoli; light luncheon is 
shrimp and grape salad with dill, cup of soup, roll, and 
beverage; special of the day is stuffed steak rolls, scalloped 
potatoes, country style peas or stir fry vegetables, roll, and 
beverage; desserts include baked alaska, raspberry parfait, and 
assorted pies. 

This Friday, Ju. 17 

Soup du jour is Swiss potato; Ught luncheon is Rueben 
sandwich, cup of soup, rolls, and beverage; special of the day 
is veal parmigiana, pasta Florentine with mushrooms, French 
style beans or Brussels sprouts, roll, and beverage; desserts in- 
clude lemon angel food cake, chocolate eclairs, and assorted 
pies. 




18a8rOTUGBTDM«4i;, Ju. 13. IMt 



Sasqoehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 




The Susquebamia Room's menu for the week starting today, Monday, Jan. 
13, is presented as furnished by the Susquehanna Rgom management. 

Dill7 Bictkfut -^ 

Scrambled eggs, 39'; huh browni, SS'; home fties, %%'\ paicaka, $1,29; French toast, 99*; 
waffles, 99*; laiuage, 79' 

DiilT Silad Bar 
Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomatoes, onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, 
radishes, spinach, applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple but- 
ter, jello, potato salad, com relish 

Daily Sudwkkd 
Daily sandwiches include Quarter pounder, $I.2S, cheeseburger, S1.3S, pizza, S.SS, pizza 
w/topping, S.70, American hoagie, SI. 49 



Moiday, Jai. 13 
UKk 

Manhattan steak gravy .potato k vegetable, 
$2.39, 

Turlcey.filling, potato and vegetable, $2.69 
Soip 
Com chowder, beef noodle. 

DIucr 
Roast top round beef, gravy, poUto and 
vegetable, $2.89 

Spagetti & meatballs, and Italian bread $2.39 
Sudwlctei 
Turkey, $1.39, tuna salad, $1.39, chicken 
salad, $1.39. 



Tiewlay, Jai. 14 
Uick 

Franks k beans, with potato, $1.99; 
chicken nuggets, potato k vegetable; $2.39 
Soip 
Chicken rice.chili 

Dliner 
Vienna veal cutlet, potato k vegetable, 
$2.89; roast pork, gravy potato k vegetable, 
$2.39 

Sudwkka 
Roast beef hoagie, $1.79, chili dog,$.89, 
grilled cheese, $.79 



WcdicnUr, Jaa. IS 
UKk 

Rigatoni/meatball, Italian bread, $2.19; 
pork/Med rice, eggroll, $2.39 
Soip 
Ham k bean, cream of broccoli 

DIucr 
BBQ spareiibs, poUto k vegetable, $2.89; 
golden fHed clams, potato k vegetable, $2.79 
Saidwkhei 
Ham BBQ, $1.23; chicken patty, $1.39; 
steak & cheese, $1.79 

Tkandiy, Jai. 1( 
Laack 

Meatloaf, potato k vegetable$2.39 
macaroni k cheese, vegeuble, $2.19 
Soap 
Beet barley, tomilo rice 

DiMer 
RavoU k pork cutlet, Italian bread, 
$2.89;fried chicken, poUto k vegatable, $2.49 



Friday, Jaa. 17 
Uack 

Fish k chips, vegetable, 
$2.39; chicken pot pie.vegetable, $2.39 



sroniGBTnMMdiT, lu. n, i«ud19 




Coutrnctioii of the Advanced 
Technologjr ind Allied Heilth Center con- 
tinnes on the inside u cold weilher con- 
dnuM. Completion date la still estimited to 
be June 1987. [SPOTLIGHT photo by LeRoy 
S. WhitmireJr.l 



ON THE 
INSIDE 



PBL Book 

Sale 

Opens 



Phi Beta Lambda(PBL) 
will be holding a used book 
sale beginning today, Jan. 13, 
in Room 3, sub-level. 
Academic Center, according 
to Lonnie Reinard, accounting 
and business management stu- 
dent, and PBL president from 



Port Trevorton. 

Students may bring books 
they wish to sell on consign- 
ment to the PBL office, 
Reinard added. 

The sale will last for two 
weeks. 



Be Sure to Check the Drop/ Add 
Deadlines 



20nSrOTUGBTaMo*4i;, Ju. 13, INt 



Trustees Appointed 

BOARD NOW UP TO FULL COMPLEMENT 



The Williamsport Oty 
Council recently approved six 
new appointees and one reap- 
pointment to the College 
Board of Trustees. 

The new members filled 
positions vacated by four 
members whose terms ended 
with the completion of the 
Fall 1985 semester and two 
positions which have been va- 
cant for some time. 

Newly-appointed to the 
Board are: 

- James H. Crossley, a 
certified public accountant, of 
Williamsport. 

- George H. Groves, 
president of Northern Central 
Bank, of Williamsport. 

- Gregory D. Johnson, 
account executive for Merrill, 
Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & 
Smith Inc., of Williamsport. 

- Robert J. Meacham, 
psychologist, of Williamsport. 

- Robert T. Manley, 
commercial services manager 
for Pennsylvania Power & 
Light Co., Williamsport. 

- William J. McLean, 
general manager of Grumman 
AUied Industries, of 
Williamsport. 



Reappointed to the Board 
was Harry B. Dietrick, of 
Dusbore. 

Trustees who recently 
vacated positions are Or. 
John H. Bone, of Jersey 
Shore; Paul A. Paulhamus, of 
Williamsport; C. William 
Sick, of Dusbore, and Robert 
E. Swartzlander, of Dalmatia. 

Other trustees whose 
terms have not ended and 
who will continue to serve on 
the Board are Mrs. Kathryn 
W. Lumley, chairperson, of 
Jersey Shore; Lester L. Lessig, 
vice chairperson, of 
Williamsport; Louis S. 
Eiseman, secretary, of 
Williamsport; Dr. Paul Hens, 
of Mill HaU; W. Jack Lewis, 
of Millville, and Quentin S. 
Snook, of Mifflinburg. 

The Board of Trustees is 
the policy-making and govern- 
ing body for the College. As 
such, the Board is responsible 
for approving all legal action 
taken by the College, in- 
cluding items such as con- 
tracts, hiring of employees, 
institution of new employees, 
and approval of building 
plans. 



The College in cooperation with 
the Williamsport Film Society will pre- 
sent a series of interaational fihns at 
the CoU^. There are five fihns in the 
series. 

Students of the College with 
validated ID cards will not have to 
pay admission. 

There will be two showings of the 
films. Presentations will be in the 
Academic Center Auditorium. Titles 
will be announced as the showing 
dates near. 

Anyone interested in joining the 
Society may telephone College Ext. 
763. Individual membership is SIS. 



SKntlCHTDMoidiy, ill. 13, 1W«d21 

International 

Film Series 

TO BE ON Campus 




STDP 



Fall Parking Sticker 

Valid This Semester; 

Warning Given on Speeding 

The College Security Office personnel are reminding 
students that parking stickers issued during the Fall 198S 
semester are still valid. 

All vehicles must be registered for on-campus parking. 

The Security Office is open Monday through Friday from 
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Students are also reminded tiiat tiie speed Umit on campus 
is 10 m.p.h., and will be enforced, officers said. 



MAY GRADS NEED TO FILE 
PETITION TO GRADUATE 

The Student Records Office personnel are reminding May 
graduates that tiie last day to petition to graduate is Feb. 14. 
There is a S5 processing fee. 

After Feb. 14, tiie processing fee will be $10. 

May graduates can petition anytime after their bills have 
been paid. 



22a8POTUGHTOMontar. Ju. 13. IN* 




The College recendy received three motorcycles 
from Robert Logue, owner of Bob Logue Motor 
Sports, Williamsport. The motorcylces - a CB500 
Honda street bike, a 185CC Honda three-wheeler bike, 
and a lOOCC Honda road bike - were given to the 
College to be used in the outdoor power equipment 
program and the secondary-level small gas engine pro- 
gram. The vehicles have an accumulated value of 
$1,395. Students will use the motorcylces for identifica- 
tion of parts, assembly, troubleshooting, and repair. 
Logue is a member of the Outdoor Power Equipment 
Advisory Committee for the College. 
[Courtesy pholol 



Motorcycles 

Donated 

TO College 



This Week / 



Monday, Jan. 13 through Sunday, Jan. 19 



MEETINGS 

Student Government Association... Executive Committee, 4 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday 
Jan. 14, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

AcriviriES 

SU trip... this Wednesday, Jan. 15, bus leaves Learning Resources Center bus loop 
at 5 p.m. and returns at 10 p.m.; sponsored by intramural sports/College activities. 

Movie... 7:30 p.m., this Saturday, Jan. 18: "The Prodigal". Academic Center 
Auditorium; tickets $2 at the door and $1.50 in advance at the Christian Ught 
Bookstore or Rugged Cross Records; sponsored by Momingstar Ministries 
of Central Pennsylvania. 

Tobogganing... at Eagles Mere, scheduled for this Sunday, Jan. 19: ciocellcd doe to 
weather. 



SPaTUGHTDMoid*;, )u. 13, 19Ud23 




GroDDdskeepen Mike Miller Qeft) and Gene 
Rlcker (right) hive been sprocing ap the 
greenery aronnd campos during recent days. 
[SPOTUGHT photo by LeRoy S. Whilmire 
Jr. J 



THINK 
SPRING! 



ID PHOTO PROCESSING 

New photo ID processing will be held in the Recreation Center 
Dt-fice, A137,, Li+c-?lDng Education Center at the tollowinq times: 



Mondav 


January 


Tuesdiiy 


January 


Wednesday 


January 


Thursday 


January 


Fr 1 day 


January 


Saturday 


January 


Sunday 


January 


Monday 


January 


7 uesday 


January 


Wednesday 


January 


Thursday 


January 


Friday 


January 



00 


AM 


- 8: 


: 00 


PM 


00 


AM 


-8; 


1 00 


PM 


00 


AM 


- 8: 


: 00 


PM 


00 


AM 


- 8: 


:00 


Pn 


00 


AM 


_ 4; 


lOO 


PM 


00 


PM 


- 4: 


too 


PM 


00 


PM 


- 4: 


; 00 


PM 


00 


AM 


- 8: 


00 


PM 


00 


AM 


- 8: 


t 00 


PM 


00 


AM 


- 8: 


00 


PM 


00 


AM 


- 8: 


00 


PM 



AM - 4 : 00 PM 



24aSPOTLlGHTaMoo<taT. Jii 13, ifU 



I Gave Selective Service 
My Autograph! 




Selective Service just wants youi- 
name, that's all. So take five minutes, 
go to the Post Office and 
out the card. I did. ..and I( 
what happened to me. 

If you're turning 18, 
register with Selective 
Service. It's quick. It's 
easy. And it's the law. 




~-':i3^^s^^«ii^smm,i^m^s^mmmm:iss^'msi^mm^^^^&mm'-''''''f'mmmimmi 



■OTUCHTOMoidi;, 111. 13, UMolS 




Pinl W. Goldfeder, luisUnt profeuor 
of burincM ind idTiscr to Phi Beti Limb- 
di Qeft), ind Lonnie Rtinird, iccooDling 
ud boiinesi miiiigeineiil stodent tnd PBL 
preiidciil from Port TrevortoD, helped out 
daring (he holiday wuon by ringing the 
belb for the Silvitlon Army. 
ISPOTUGHT photo by Donna L TrimbleJ 



HELPING 

THE 

CAUSE 



S^S^'^'S S ^00^ ^ A co-ed. 



^*^rr«^e 



26DSPOTUGHTDMMd«j. Ju. 13, 1M« 

Intramural basketball rules 



Two 20 minute halves. Two 10 minute quarters maJee up each half. One minute break 
between quarters and a five minute break between halves. The clock will be ran continuously 
until the final two minutes of both halves. It will then be stopped during each stoppage of play. 
There will be two 30 second timeouts per half for each team. In the event of a tie at the end of 
regulation, there will be an overtime period of three minutes. Each team receives an additional 
30 second timeout to utilize during the overtime period. The clock will stop only during the 
final minute of the overtime period upon stoppage of play. In the event of a tie following the 
overtime, There will be an overtime period with the same stipulations until an eventual winner 
is determined. Timeouts not utilized during the allotted period do not accumulate and 
therefor, must be used with discretion. 

Players 

There will be three players on the court for each team during play. Failure to have this 
amount will result in automatic forfeiture. Minimum team roster is six players and cannot ex- 
ceed a twelve player limit. 

Substitutions 

Substitutions are mandatory at the five minute mark of each period or during the stoppage 
of play preceding or following that point. This mandatory substitution will require complete 
changeover of personnel on the court. No other substituitions are allowed except in the event 
of an injury. The mandatory substitution rule is imposed to allow every player an opportunity 
to participate in the event. 



Fouls 

Fouls will be cancelled by the individual who is the recipient of the violation. The oppos- 
ing team is expected and required to honor the foul call and play will resume with the ball being 
brought into play at the mid-court line. 

Scoring 

Baskets will count for two points. There will be no foul shots with the exeption of fouls 
occuring during the final two minutes of each half. The individual fouled will be awarded two 
shots if he is in the act of shooting and will receive a one and one opportunity for other foul in- 
fractions. In hte event there is a dispute over whether the individual fouled was in the act of 
shooting or not, the official observing the game will make the determination. The decision of 
this official is final and play will resume. 



I Please turn 10 Page 27 



sroTUGHTaMoidi}, ju. 1], intoll 

m CoKSmtdfiom Page 26 

Game rules 

Play will begin with team designated by the game official as the home team putting it into 
play at the mid-court line. The visiting team will have possession of the ball to begin the se- 
cond half. 

Teams will be responsible for calling traveling violations, out of bounds decisions, ball 
handling misues, etc. The team upon which the violation is called will honor the call and play 
will resume from the nearest out of bounds point from where the infraction occuned or the 
mid-court line. Games will be played by N.C.A.A. rules in all instances except where stated 
otherwise. 

The reasons for these changes from the traditional basketball rules are due to the space re- 
quired to play several games at one time, this will alleviate the problem of player overflow 
adversely affecting another game on the adjacent court. 2.1t will allow each individual that 
registers to be an active participant. 3.These changes provide for a more wide-open, high scor- 
ing game. 

A player will be disqualified for unacceptable behavior in an unsportsmanlike manner. A 
team will be disqualified for repeated violations by team members. 



Volleyball rules 



Time 

Best of three games or 43 minutes time limit. In the event the match goes full time limit 
before the completion of the third game, the team that is ahead by a minium of two points will 
be declared a winner. If the margin of difference is less than two points, play will resume until 
one team is ahead by two points, and is declared the winner. Teams losing two matches will be 
eliminated from the volleyball tournament. 

Players 

There will be a minium of six players on each team. The team limit cannot exceed twelve 
players. Failure to have six players at the beginning of the game will result in automatic 
forfeiture unless special adjustment has been made with approval of the game official. 

Substitutions 

Substitutions are allowed through the match and must be requested to the official by the 
captain of the team seeking the change. Substitutions are mandatory following the completion 
of the match. At the completion of the first game, any player entering the game must assume 
position player he/she has substituted. 



■■ Please turn to Page 2S 



28ogrOTUGHTDM(ndir, 1—. 13, 1M< 

CmHiuuifiom Page 27U»t 

Equipment 

Players miut have athletic gear which includes snealcers. Jeweliy and other potentially 
dangerous otijects such as casts, braces, etc. are prohibited. 

Game Rules 

There will be a coin toss to decide first service and playing area. The team that wins the 
toss will have the choice. Games will be played by U.S.V.B.A.(United States Volleyball' 
Association) rules in all instances except where stated otherwise. A player will be disqualified 
for repeated violations by team memben. Games will officiated by the players on the court, 
points scored and penalties incurred will be honored by the opposing team in all cases. 
Disputes of contraverial calls will be settled by the game official in cases where he/she feels 
mediation is necessary. Judgments of the game official are final. The game official will run the 
timeclock and keep score for both teams. Finals will be officiated by qualified officials. 



An Invitation... ^, 

...to join the staff 

of 
The SPOTLIGHT 

Students interested in joining the staff 

of the student newspaper 

should contact the adviser 

or a staff member 

in Room 7, Basement 

Academic Center 

on weel<days, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. . ' 



mJ^ 



SPOIUGHTDMoidir, Ju. 13, lNta29 



Help. 

Our Cities. 
Our Oceans. 
Our Trees. 
Our Towns. 
Our Forests. 
Our Rivers. 
Our Air. 
Our Mountains. 
Our Plants. 
Our Pishes. 
Our Streams. 
Our Deserts. 
Our Lakes. 
Our Tomorrows. 

Give a hoot. 
Don't pollute. 

Forest Service, USD. A. & 




30a8POTUGHTaMoidi;, iu. 13, IMt 



P.R.I.D.E. 

and 

TEACHING through LEARNING CHANNELS 

Graduate Courses That Bridge Theory and Practice 

Two Highlights: Courses Instructed at 
W.A.C.C.... 

ED529 (WUkes): Mondays, 6 to 9:45 p.m., Jan. 27-April 28, at W.A.C.C. 
ED 529 (Wilkes): Wednesdays, 6 to 9:45 p.m., Jan. 29-April 30, at W.A.C.C. 

Telephone... Dennis Ringling at College Ext. 8-24 or 
at (717) 546-2194 or (800) 526-4630 



JOE MIGNANOS SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 

PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

HoQn: Mon.-Sal. II a.m. lo 9 p.m. Closed Sunday 

Monday Regular Sub Whole $1.60 

Tuesday Meatball Whole $1.75 

Wednesday Turkey Whole $1.40 

DAILY SPECIALS Thursday Ham Whole $1,80 

Friday Tuna Whole $1.70 

Saturday Cheese Steak Whole $2.50 
•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" $4 whole $2.10 half 




SPOTUGBTDMoidi;, Ju. 13, 1»Md31 



Be Involved! 
Join A Club 
or Other College 
Organization! 




Open 7 a.m. to midnight 

Monday thru Friday 

Qp«i Satunbiy I p.m. to 3 a.m. 



Barry says: We won't cook a barger before iti time. 

Brooklyn Style Eatery 



•A Unique Eating experience 
•Best Breakfast in Town 
•Arcade and Pool Table 
•Daily Specials 

234 Park SI. Just across from 
the new east parking lot 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Qean, well-heated rooms available w/shower and kitchen. 
Newly remodeled, Across from WACO. 
$575 /semester, all utilities included. 
Call 323-366.1, or inquire at: Barry's Sub Shop at 234 Park St. 
(Opposite east parking lotl 
ALSO: 3 bedroom apartment for rent. 



32DSPOTLICHTDMoidij, Ju. 13, 1M» 



THANK YOU! 



The SPOTLIGHT thanks those listed below 

who gave us support through using this 

newspaper as their advertising medium 

during the last semester. 



ABC Bowling Lanes 

Barry's Subs 

Benson's AM-PM Mini-Market 

Birthright inc. 

Burger King, Maynard Street 

Clllo's College Corner 

Court and Willow Cafe 

Dennis Buck Hairstyiing 

Domino's Pizza 

Exchange Mart 

Hair Concepts Inc. 

K & S Photo Lab 

Little Ceasar's Pizza 

The Mail Room, River Ave. 

Joe Mignano's Sub Shop 

Hoby's Hoagles & Pizza 

Pudgle's Pizza, Washington Blvd. 

international 

Tastee Freez 

United States Army 

W.A.C.C. Bookstore 



§5. • 



- 





rr 



c 



Q 
3 



I )m Hn fm' TSfij' jin wn jw w^ 






> 1 ' 



% 



iDSPOTUGHTDMoidij, Im. M. 1M* 



SPOTLIGHT / Vd. 21, No. 17 / Monday, J«n. 20, 1988 

Th« SPOTUOHT Is pul)««he<) weekly oo Mon<).y morning, except lof oHIcW CoUee* «e««ons by low- 
™ill«n »K> oltm inlefeeted .tudent. OpInKx.. e«xe(«d »emo.eotlfte.Wl...wt»(e<xot lndMdu.1 
wrllere and do no! redecl otflcW inBtuUona) oolnlon 

OWce: Room 7. Beeemenl. Academic Centef Telephone: Exi 221, |7iri 326-3781 

STAFF THIS ISSUE: Wanna F Brown. LeRoy S WhlUnlre Jr . Kethy L Cobb, Cynlhia E A Hwtranlt, Joel 
J MKjer, Uea E Secrlsl, Lyie A Wagner. Jame. E Treeae. Cathedne A. Hannoo. and Bronda M. Vlben 
Faculty advtaef Anthony N. Clllo. 



ABC BOWLING LANES 

124S Park Avenue (at Rose St.) 

CoUege League Sign-ups 
Men, Women, or Mixed 
Three persons per team 



PRICE $3.00 




FREE SHOES 



Sign up - Tuesday, Jan. 21 
Start - Tuesday, Jan. 28 

If you would like to bowl and this 
time doesn't fit your schedule, please 
phone for other times available. 

326-2885 

Free trophies and party provided by 
ABC Bowling Lanes. 



The Cover 

The Qym came alive 
again last week as students 
and others played baskett>all 
and other activities. 
SPOTLIGHT photographer 
LeRoy S. Whltmlre Jr. cap- 
tured these two Intense 
players. 
In tower photo, Whltmlre 
highlights the first day of 
"real snow" for this 
semester. The forecast called 
for a tot more snow, but It 
turned out to be just a light 
coating 



YOUR RISK 

Intramural 
Athletics Per- 
sonnel Remind 
Ttiose Par- 
ticipating In In- 
tramural 
Athletics that, 
as stated In the 
Student Hand- 
book, They Do 
So at Their Own 
Risk and that 
The College is 
Not Responsible 
for Property 
Theft, Damage, 
or Injury which 
IMay Occur. 
[Special An- 
nouncement/- 
SPOTUGHT 
Campus Service] 



SPOTUGHTDMonlt;, lu. It, ItUDJ 



SPOTLIGHT//!^... Elaine J. Lambert 



"There are a lot of creative minds here... 
in both students and staff..." 




MRS. ELAINE J. LAMBERT 
Interim director of commnnlcitioiu 

(SPOTLIGHT photo by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr.) 



Bj Kithf L. Cobb 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Stiff 



Mrs. Elaine J. Lambert, ioterim 
director of communications for the Col- 
lege, is a Williamsport native. A 1979 
graduate of the College's journalism pro- 
gram, Mrs. Lambert is responsible for 
College advertising, media relations, 
publications and the printing operations. 
After having been graduated from 
the College, Mrs. Lambert worked as a 
reporter for the WiUiamsport Sun- 
Gazette. In December of 1980, she 
returned to the College to fill the posi- 
tion of communications clerk. She has 
held her current position since last July. 
Mrs. Lambert is also a former 
SPOTLIGHT staff member. 
About the College, Mrs. Lambert 
said, "I think what makes the College 
different is that it's always changing. 
That makes for a very electric at- 
mosphere. There are a lot of creative 
minds here - in both students and staff. 
I think the future holds nothing but suc- 
cess for the College." 
She also stated that she is interested 
in furthering her education "when the 
pace slows down" and is particularly in- 
terested in the mass communications pro- 
gram at Lycoming College. 
In her spare time, Mrs. Lambert en- 
joys creative writing, sewing and quilting, 
and shopping at flea markets for antiques 
and country crafts. 
Mrs. Lambert's husband, "Buc", is 
employed as head of the composing 
department at the Sun-Gazette. The cou- 
ple has no children and reside in the 
country just outside of Montoursville. 
Mrs. Lambert's mother, Mrs. Estella 
J. Helm, is also employed by the College 
- as a dupUcating machine operator in 
the Duplicating and Mail Services Sec- 
tion. 



4DSPOTUGHTGMoi<l«T, in M. I'M 

Fighting Terrorism: 

Should Americans 

BE Forced 

TO Leave Libya? 

QuMt Commentary 
By Robart E. Fink, ganarat atudlaa atudant from Muncy Valley 

I think that the Individual rights ot the Americans (In Libya] are being Infringed upon. 
The hallmark of American society Is Individual freedom. Freedom of movement, although 
not specifically stated In the Bill of Rights, can be applicable by the use ot the Ninth 

'"'Therefore, there may be grounds to prove Reagan's order as unconstitutional, is our 
respect for national unity greater than our respect for individual freedom, regardless ot 
what national unity might entali? Furthermore, why are American companies allowed to 
stay In Libya while American citizens are "ordered" to leave? 

These questions lead me to ask other questions: One of which is subject to Ronald 
Reagan's leadership. Mr. Reagan Is said to be a great communicator and, like some past 
presidents, he speaks on an emotional level. This emotional level may unite the 
people, but It doesn't solve complex problems ot an international nature. Emotional 
answers to problems are Illogical when dealing with the stakes ot global foreign policy. 
Various leaders throughout the free world have expressed great concern for Reagan's re- 
cent foreign policy decision on Libya. 

The order lor Americans to leave Libya Is but one part. The other two suggestions 
by Reagan are economic sanctions and a possible military strike - all lli-concelved ac- 
cording to many of the world's leaders. Such lli-concelved policy seems to be a 
trademark of a country at the top, on its way down. 

This event and future events are going to determine our path in history. We cannot 
be the world's greatest leader when our governments actions are substantially Ineffective 
upon the acquisition of answers to national as well as International ones. 

Vietnam Is yet another example of an attempt at effective foreign policy. If America 
can't answer the questions of today, then somebody else might come along and answer 
them for us tomorrow. 

After all, "Nothing falls like success". 

Thinner. King's Latest Success 

By Kithy L. Cobb of th* SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Bizarre. In the King tradition, Thinner court, Halleck Is approached by the ancient 

holds you spellbound from first page to last. lather of the gypsy woman, who chillingly 

In this novel, Stephen King (under the whispers one word: "Thinner." 
pen name of Richard Bachman), describes Halleck, who is fifty pounds overweight 

the fate of Billy Halleck, a successful lawyer and swiftly approaching an age when heart 

and devoted family man. attacts lurk just around the corner, suddenly 

After accidentally striking an old gypsy begins to lose weight. As the pounds meit off, 

woman while driving through his quiet Con- slowly at first, then more rapidly as the days 

nectlcut hometown, his life suddenly turns pass, Halieck's thoughts turn from surprised 

upside-down. pleasure to terror: his weight continues to 



Exonerated of any guilt by a friendly 



PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 14 



Whaddya' Say...? 



SPOTLIGHTaMoidar, Ju. 2«, IMtoS 



Question: Becaua* of tho Increasing threat of tarrorlam, Praaldant 
Raagan haa ordarad all Americana out of Libya by a certain date or 
serious penaltlea will Im Impoaed. Doea this violate American human 
righta? Does the President have the right to Impoae such orders? 



Photos and Interviews 
BY LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. 





Lene M. Zarzyczny, human 
services student from 
Wllllamsport: "I Itiink they 
should have a choice, it Isn't 
fair that penalties should be 
Imposed on these Americans 
If they do not wish to return to 
the United States." 



Scott D. Engleman. elec- 
tronics student from Milton: 
"Reagan Is defeating the 
American dream. That Is, 
Americans should have the 
choice to do what they want 
to do." 



Jerry A. Wise, machine tool 
technology student from 
Tower City: "Technically, no. 
He does not have right since 
Libya Is an International coun- 
try. Even though, obviously, 
for the simple fact he Is trying 
to avoid the situation of these 
people being taken hostage". 




Angela L. Patz, general 
studies student from Mon- 
tgomery: "Reagan should ask 
them If they want to come 
back to this country. It should 
not be a direct order." 



Daniel D. Clark, electronics 
student from Mansfield: "If 
they wish to remain In Libya 
that should be their choice; 
they know the risk." 



George J. Lemprlnos, elec- 
tronics student from Milton: "I 
think It Is okay to do It. He Is 
just trying to save their lives." 



6aSI>OTUGBTaMo«liT, Ju. 21, 1*M 



Bulletin Board / Momky. /«>■ 20 iHnu^ Sunday, Jm. 26 

MEETINGS 

Gamma EpsUon Tau... noon to 1 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan. 21, Room BI07, 
Lifelong Education Center (LEC) 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan. 21, Room B107, LEC. 

Student Government Association Executive Committee... 4 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Jan. 21, Room B107, LEC. 

Student Government Association Senate... 5 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 
Room B107, LEC. 

Multi-Cultural Society... 2 to 3 p.m., this Wednesday, Jan. 22, Room B107, LEC. 

Narcotics Anonymous... 7 to 10 p.m., this Wednesday, Jan. 22, Room B107, LEC. 

SPOTLIGHT... 3 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan. 21, Room B107, LEC. 

Gym Work Study Students... 4 p.m., this Wednesday, Jan. 22, in the Gymnasium for 

a brief meeting. 

ACTIVITIES 

Ski trip... this Wednesday, Jan. 22, bus leaves Learning Resources Center (LRQ bus 
loop at 5 p.m. and returns at 10 p.m. (Note: departure has been changed to 5 p.m. 
fromS:30 p.m. which was originally stated on calendar.] Sponsored by intramural 
sports/CoUege activities. 

Ice skating... this Thursday, Jan. 23, bus leaves the LRC bus loop at 3:30 p.m. and 
returns at 11 p.m. Additional information is available by telephoning College Ext. 763. 

Intramural athletic rosters are to be turned in at the Recreation Center Office in the 
Lifelong Education Center this Thursday, Jan. 23 for volleyball and basketball. 

Raffle... now until Feb. 6, cash prizes of {100 for first, S30 for second, and $23 for 
third, sponsored by Civil Technology Club. More information available from Lamont But- 
ters, Room 108, Building Trades Center (BTQ, or by calling College Ext. 272, or contact 
any club member. 

Recreation Center closed... this Sunday, Jan. 26; will resume regular hours next Mon- 
day, Jan. 27 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) 

Open gym... 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. this Saturday, Jan. 23, for teens... Bardo Gymnasium 
in cooperation with the Williamsport Recreation Commission. 



p H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h ■ h 

EHIEE PlIIAr 



Buy eury size Utile Caesars 
OrigiriEJ round pizza at regular 
price, get the identiceil pizza 
FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 



I 






W.A.C.C. itndento utc 
•ddidoiul 10% only with 
itidenl I.D. ud Ihli ad. 



One coupon per customer. Canv out only. At participating locations. 




SPOTUGHTDMoidi;, Ju. M, imo? 



New programs to be Offered 



The College Board of 
Tnutees recently approved the 
addition of four new cur- 
riculums. 

Automated Manufactur- 
ing, Dental Assisting, Occupa- 
tional Therapy Assisting, and 
Culinary Arts programs will 
be made available to students 
beginning with the Fall 1986 
semester. 

According to Dr. George 
L. Baker, director of in- 
dustrial technology, the new 
Automated Manufacturing 
program is being added 
because "Industry forecasters 
predict that more than 65 per- 
cent of manufacturing in this 
country will utilize some form 
of computer-aided processes 
by 1986." 

He added that the pro- 
gram will emphasize the mass 
production of tools as oppos- 
ed to the tool technology and 
tool design programs aheady 
offered by the College. 

The new Automated 
Manufacturing curriculum will 
offer a two-year associate 
degree, and will include such 
courses as mechanical draw- 
ing, advanced programming, 
and robot applications. 

Three additional pro- 
grams will be offered by the 
Health Sciences Division. The 
first is Dental Assisting, which 
offers a one-year certificate to 
graduates. 



According to Ms. Davie 
Jane Nestarick, division direc- 
tor, the curriculum is being 
added to those offered by the 
College because "formal 
training in an accreditted pro- 
gram will allow for certifica- 
tion" whereas cunently, the 
majority of those in the field 
receive on-the-job training. 

She added that con- 
siderable research had been 
done to assess the need for 
formally trained dental 
assistants, and the findings 
showed not only the interest 
of those in the field to 
upgrade their education, but 
the interest of employers for 
assistants with formal train- 
ing. 

According to Ms. 
Nestarick, job availability has 
increased on both a state and 
national level of between 36 
percent and 43 percent by 
1990-1995. 

The program will include 
such courses as dental 
assisting pathology and phar- 
macology for dental 
assistants, and dental assisting 
practicuffl. 

Another program being 
offered next Fall is Occupa- 
tional Therapy Assistant. 
Graduates from the program 
will receive a two-year 
associate degree. According to 
Ms. Nestarick, such a pro- 



gram is necessary because 
"patient care is moving from 
acute care faciUties to 
rehabilitation, nursing homes, 
and non-traditional settings." 

The curriculum will in- 
clude courses such as 
therapeudic methods, theory, 
and field work. 

Culinary Arts is the 
another curriculum approved 
by the Board of Trustees this 
month. The program offers a 
two-year certificate. 

According to Ms. 
Nestarick, research shows that 
"the highly trained graduates 
of this program will comprise 
one of the largest occupa- 
tional groups in our nation's 
labor force. Opportunities for 
employment are expected to 
increase faster than all oc- 
cupations through the 
1990's." 

She added that the pro- 
gram will focus on "hands-on 
advanced preparation techni- 
ques," and will include such 
courses as classical cuisine, 
advanced garde manager and 
buffet catering and ice carv- 
ing. 

All of the newly approv- 
ed programs are scheduled to 
be housed in the new Advanc- 
ed Technology and Health 
Sciences Center, except 
Culinary Arts, which will be 
housed in existing facilities. 



Summer Employment: Announcement from Financial Aid 

The Financial Aid Office has information on summer employment in 
South Dakota for College students. 

If any student is interested in the information he or she may come to the 
Financial Aid Office, Room 201, In the Academic Center, and review it. 



SoSPOTLIGBTDMoidiT, Jii. M, 1»M 



Employment Opportunities 

li\formlioii is provided by Iht Collttt Plactimni Office personnel in the Learning Resources Center. 
Inquiries should be directed to them and not to this newspaper. 

DuBoistown Car Wish... 2710 Brook St., South Williamsport (across Arch Street 
Bridge and to the left) has an openjog for a person to wash cars. Weekends and nights. 
Minimum wage. Apply in person to Mark Brewer. 

Allegheny Beverage... 512 Southern Ave., South Williamsport, has an opening for two 
local students to lift heavy cases. Evenings, Saturdays. $2.85 per hour. 10-12 hours per 
week. Apply in person to Carl Burk. 

Babysitter... 3 to 4 p.m. until 11:45 p.m., five days a week and every other weekend. 
Includes dinner. Salary flexible. Children are 4W and 2 years old. Call Sharon Sullivan at 
323-8892 between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. 

Babysitting... Reliable women wanted to babysit toddler a couple hours a week while 
mother runs errands. Loyalsock area. Call 323-4885. 

Diesel/heavy equipment mechanic... Spring 1986 graduates of S&O/diesel mechanics, 
Alban Tractor Company Inc., 1201 Severn Way, SterUng, Va. 22170, has 10 openings for 
mechanics. Send resume to Karl Quinn or call him at (703) 450-6700. 




ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIQHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Siwcks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groetnes 

Gasoline 



BENSON 




€MMn mini. ^ 
f^m market 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



STUDENT 
HOUSING 

Faniished Rooms 

Singles, Donbles, 

Apartments available 

ALL UTILITIES 
INCLUDED 

Showen and kitchen 
facilities 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine Ave. 

and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 

Both within one |1| 

block of WACC 

Phone 326-6536 



Dry Gym 
Shoes Needed 

All gym shoes (sneakers) 
. must be dry to enter the gym, 
said Margot R. Bayer, student 
activities assistant. 

If the weather is wet and 
snowy, please bring a dry pair 
of gym shoes to change into, 
Ms. Bayer added. 




Our Ciries. 
Our Oceans. 
Our Trees. 
Our Towns. 
Our Forests. 
OurRiveis. 
Our Air. 
Our Mountains. 
Our Plants. 
Our Fishes. 
Our Streams. 
Our Deserts. 
Our Lakes. 
Our Tomorrows. 



SPOTUGHTDMoodiT, Ju. U, 19Md9 




MARGOT R. BAYER 
student activities asiistaal 

fSPOTUGHT photo by URoy S. WMtmin Jr.} 

''Intramural athletics gives 
opportunity to interact 
on an athletic level...*' 

"I would like to get as many students, faculty and staff 
involved in the intramural athletics program here at the Col- 
lege as much as possible," commented Ms. Margot R. 
Bayer, student activities assistant. [Her first name is pro- 
nounced Mar-GO.) 

She adds, "Intramural athletics is an opportunity for 
students, faculty and staff to interact on an athletic level as 
well as an academic level." 

Ms. Bayer, a native of Philadelphia, now resides in the 
Williamsport area. A graduate of the College with a degree 
in Uberal arts, she later received her bachelor's degree in 
criminal justice from Lycoming College in 1983. 

Ms. Bayer's interests include scuba divmg, siomg, rac- 
quetball, para-sailing, jazz, gourmet cooking, and the out- 
doors. 



lOaspoiuGHTaMmdtr, Ju. n, int 



PBL 

Recruiting 

Week 

Now 

IN 

Progress 



By Suu R. Killuurad 
Of the SPOTLIGHT SUff 



The Phi BeU Lambda (PBL) Nadonal Spring Recruitiiig 
Week is underway and will continue through Wednesday, 
Jan. 29, according to Paul W. Goldfeder, assistant professor 
of business administration and club adviser. 

Interested students, he said, are being urged by him and 
current members to pick up an application from an officer 
in the Phi Beta Lambda Office in Room 3, lower level. 
Academic Center as well as to plan for many upcoming ac- 
tivities during the semester. 

Phi Beta Lambda is the college level of Future Business 
Leaders of America with chapters in 37 coUeges and univer- 
sities of Pennsylvania and is the largest business-oriented 
organization in the country, Goldfeder said. 

Officers for this semester are Ceylon S. (Lonnie) 
Reinard, business accounting student from Port Trevorton, 
president; Richard L. Evans Jr., business accounting student 
from Troy, vice president; Brenda J. Wolfe, computer 
science student from Montoursville, secretary; Daniel L. 
Thorp, accounting student from Troy, treasurer; William A. 
Shannon, auto mechanics student from Williamsport, ad- 
ministrative aide. 

The organization will meet tomorrow at 3:30, in Room 
329, of the Academic Center, with Reinard presiding. New 
committees will be appointed and plans for the semester 
discussed. 

Goldfeder and current members are reminding students 
that soda and snacks are available for purchase in the PBL 
office. 



GAMMA 




EPSILON 



TAU 



WELCOMES YOa BACK 

AND WISHES EVERYONE 

A HAPPY NEW YEAR. 



V 



UNES... LINES... LINES. 



gPOTUGBIOMoidi;, Ju. It, IMtall 



Tht liae tt (he Sindnt 
Reconb window growi 
u itadeati conlinn or 
rcTimp their new 
Khednlei. 





Somettmei the tint week of cluiet 
Menu Uke u entUeu wait for 
Tuioni new-Mmetter ictiylties. 
Stndenti wiit for Divid Cnnn- 
InghuB, Recreitlon Center luls- 
ttnt, to TiUdate ID cirdi. 



(SPOTLIGHT photoi 

By LcRoT 8. Whitmiie Jr.) 



Stndenti wait to giln 
entnnce to the College 
Bookftore. 




llogrOTUGHTDMoadar, In. U, IfU 



Sasqaehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 

The Susquehanna Room's menu for the week starting today, Monday, Jan. 20, is 
presented as furnished by the Susquehanna Room management. 
DiD; Bnakfu) 
&raiiibled eggs, 59*; hiuli browns, SS'; home fries, SS'; pancakes, SI. 29; French toast, 99'; waffles, 99*; 
sausage, 79"; bacon 79*. 

Dill; Salad Bv 
Salad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomaloes, onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, radishes, spinach, 
applesauce, cole slaw, eggs, bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple butter, JeUo, potato salad, com relish. 
DaO; Saidwickes 
Daily sandwiches include Quarter pounder,J1.25, cheeseburger, SI.35, pizza, i.5i, pizza w/topping, S.70, 
American hoagie, SI. 49; ftench fries, S.SS 
Daily homemade soups will be served. 



Todsir, Moiday, Jai. 21 
Uuk 

Ham and escalloped potatoes, 
S2.39; Yankee pot roast, gravy, 
potato k vegetable, S2.S9. 
Dluer 

Fried pork chop, gravy, potato t 
vegetable, S2.69; Colorado cube 
steak, gravy, potato t vcgeuble, 
$2.69. 

Saadwkhei 
Steak t cheese, SI.79; tuna 
laUd, S1.S9; meaUoaf, S1.29. 



Tacaday, Ju. 21 
Uick 

Sausage A peppers, homefries, 
S2.39; chicken nuggets, potato i 
vegetable, S2.39. 

Dluer 

Manicotti ft small salad bar, 
Italian bread, S2.89; Maryland crab 
cakes, pouto ft vegeuble, $2.59. 
Saidwtckca 

Turkey, $1.39; ham salad, 
$1.39; taco, $.99 



Wedieaday, Jai. 22 
Uick 

Fried clam strip, potato ft 
vegetable, $2.59; sweet ft sour meat- 
balls, potato ft vegeuble, $2.39. 
Diucr 

FiUed 1/4 chicken, gravy, potato 
ft vegetable, $2.39; ground round 
steak, gravy, potato ft vegetable, 
$2.59. 

Saadwkkea 

Chicken hoagie, $1.59; sausage 
hoagie, $1.59; chili dog, $.89 



Phi Beta Lambda 
BOOK SALE 




Bring your used books to the PHI 

BETA LAMBDA (PBL) office or come 

down and see whit we have. 

The PBL BOOK SALE is a service 

to students. There is a $1 service charge 
to seii your books. 

PBL office is iocated in Room 3 

Power level of the Academic Center. 



Tkuiday, Ju. 23 

UlKk 

Ham ft Broccoli Benedict over 
English muffin, $2.39; stuffed pepper, 
potato ft vegeuble, $2.39. 
Diiier 

Western beef roast, gravy, 
pouto ft vegetable, $2.89; creamed 
chicken over waffles, potato ft 
vegeuble, $2.89 

Sudwkkei 

Meatball hoagie, $1.59; chicken 
salad, $1.59; egg salad, $1.29. 

On Friday, Jan. 24 The Sus- 
quehanna Room introduces a 
new item on the menu. As a 
pre-Lenten special, we will 
serve fish nuggets, macaroni 
and cheese, and cole slaw for 
J1.59 

"We hope you enjoy them 
and ask that you will give your 
response to them," the Sus- 
quehanna Room management 
stated. 



SPOTOGHTDMoidi,, Ju. U, INloU 




ProfcMlonil tree trinimen tttncted 
sone ittention lut week u (hey badly 
trimmed brtnchei OTeriooklog Sdi-- 
qDehuni Stieel, between Vine Avenne 
ind West Third Streeb, lo thit electricil 
linet woold not be obatrncted. The trim- 
men worit for JAFLO, m Alkntown- 
bued company, ind were onder contnct 
lo PP4L. /SPOTLIGHT photo by LeRoy 
S. mitmireJr.) 




Peer Information 
and Referral Center 



Students 

helping 

fellow 

students 



OUT 
ON A 
LIMB? 



ROOM 105 
GYMNASIUM 

Hours: 
Mon.-Thurt.: 

10 A.M.-7P.M. 

Friday: 

10 A.M.-2P.M. 

Closed W««kends 



14a8POnJGHTaMiwdir, )u. U, INt 



drop regardless o( the amount ol food he con- 
sumes. 

His family lite becomes tense. Then, as 
the situation deteriorates, an Idea for possible 
salvation forms In Halleck's mind, and he sets 
off to find the answer which will save his life. 

King has brought us yet another splne- 
tlngllng chiller, with an approplate amount of 
vwniin>«^x suspense, mystery, and yes, sex and 
FROM PAQE 4 violence. Of course. King throws a monkey- 
wrench Into the book's climax - an unex- 
pected twist which leaves the reader 
breathless. 



Thinnsr: 

King's 
Latest 

CONTINUED 



PHI BETA LAMBDA 

National Recruiting Week 
Jan. 20-29 



^^^ 



EDUCATION 



National Business Organization 
Students in Business, Business Computer 
Science and Business elective courses 
are eligible 

Applications available in room S 
of the Academic Center (sub-level) 

LEARN TO BE A LEADER 

The Community College's Outstanding College Organization 



PHEAA 

ANXIOUS 
TO HELP 
DIRECTOR 

SAYS 

The Pennsylvania Higher 
Education Assistance Agency 
(PHEAA) is anxious to assist 
students who reside in those 
counties declared federal 
disaster areas and who suf- 
fered extensive danage due to 
either Hurricane Gloria or the 
early November flooding in 
southwestern Pennsylvania, 
according to Donald S. 
Shade, financial aid director. 

PHEAA has waived the 
application deadline so that 
students who may not have 
applied for a state grant still 
may do so. In addition, 
reconsideration will be afford- 
ed those who have suffered 
substantial property losses not 
covered by insurance (that is, 
uninsured losses of Sl.SOO or 
more). 

Students in the following 
counties who would like to 
make late application or who 
would like to file for recon- 
sideration should, the director 
said, contact the Financial 
Aid Office or call PHEAA at 
l-8(XI-692-7435 for more in- 
formation. 

The counties are Luzerne, 
Lackawanna, Wayne, Sus- 
quehanna, Carbon, Wyoming, 
Allegheny, Fayette, Green, 
Somerset, Washington, and 
Westmoreland. 



Keep Red Qnss 
ready. 



SPOTLIGHTDMoidi;, Ju. M, IfHD 



IS 



Graphic Arts Students 
Attend Ink Seminar 



The Susquehanna 
In-Plant Printers Associa- 
tion recently sponsored a 
seminar tor the Graphic 
Arts and Comnnercial Art 
students at the College 
last Tuesday, Jan. 14. 

The speaker, Ben 
Gray, presently serves as 
the coordinator of 
Graphics for the 
Chesapeake Public 
Schools In Chesapeake, 
Virginia and has perform- 
ed seminars as a 
represenatlve for Van 
Son Holland Ink Corpora- 
tion of America for the 
past fifteen years. 

Gray presented a 
lecture entitled "Small 



Press Magic" in which he 
discussed eleven ways 
to extend the printing 
range of a small offset 
printing press by using 
different types of inks, 
particularly Van Son 
Holiand Inks. He also 
reviewed problem solv- 
ing and quality control 
measures to be used in 
conjunction with the Ph 
factor of offset fountain 
solutions 



In conclusion, uray 
gave a positive overview 
of the printing industry's 
future by saying that 
there are plenty of good 
jobs in the industry. He 
encouraged the students 
to develop their 
technical skills and 
abilities to the fullest, 
work hard, and have a 
good attitude toward 
their work in order to gain 
and malntlan a place In 
the printing industry. 



By JOSHUA J. BURKE 
■ Qriphic crti ttudanl from York- 



OFFICERS URGE 

STUDENTS 

TO PICK UP 

PARKING 

STICKERS 

Students who have not 
yet picked up parking stickers 
for tlieir veiucies are reminded 
to do so, according to Cecil 
C. Cryder, chief of security. 

The stickers are free and 
may be picked up in the 
Security Office in the General 
Services Building at the foot 
of Park Street. 

Those who park on Col- 
lege lots without a sticker on 
their car will be ticketed and 
fined for nat having a sticker, 
Cryder said. The fine for not 
having a parking sticker is 
$25. 



BARRY'S 



•>•>« ' .{<<<<»•.■ , v ' .ww <i »Mi»{ i wiiK»ie«w9 ae r 




Open 7 a.m. to midnight 

Monday thru Friday 

Open Saturday I p.m. to } a.m. 

Barry says: We won't cook i barger before lb Omt. 



Brooklyn Style Eatery 



•A Unique Eating experience 
•Best Breakfast in town 
•Arcade and Pool Table 
•Daily Specials 

234 Park St. Just across from 
the new east parking lot 



PHONE 
323-FOOD 



16D8P(mJGBTDMoi4ij, Ju. 21. IMt 



BUSINESS 
SYMPOSIUM 
TO BE HELD 
APRIL 4 



A Btuiness Symposium, spon- 
sored by the College's 
Business and Computer 
Technologies Division and Phi 
Beu Lambda (PEL), will be 
held Friday, April 4, accor- 
ding to Mis. Etoreen W. 
Shope, assistant professor of 
business administration. 

The symposium is ao an- 
nual event at the College and 
usually attracts large numbers 
of high school students. 

Preparing for the sym- 
posium are Paul W. 
Goldfeder, assistant professor 
of business administration and 
PEL adviser; Ruby K. Hayes, 
assistant professor of business 
administration; John W. 
Miller, instructor of computer 
science, and Mrs. Shope. 

The objective of the sym- 
posium is to give high school 
students an opportunity to ex- 
hibit their highly developed 
skills and to express their 
thoughts and ideas, according 
to the symposium planners. 

The symposium also 



CUlo's 

College 
Corner 


Yoar fiTorile Subs and 
Borgen the way yoo Uke em 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
and win a half snb 


PHONE 

322-1321 


Four winners 
every week 


1100 W. Third SI. ^ * 
(Next to Academic Center) '^ 


Come on over and gel 
lomethtn' good to eati 


Open for Breal{fast 

HOURS • Mod. thru Tbun. 

7:30 i.m. to 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.m. 



givers each business depart- 
ment an opportunity to 
analyze its educational 
endeavors and to promote 
business education. In addi- 
tion, it provides an excellent 
opportunity for high school 
students who are interested in 
the business fields to become 
acquainted with the College, 
Mrs. Shope said. 

The symposium includes 
a series of contests for high 
school business students. 
There are cunently 18 con- 
tests and more will be added 
this year. 

The contests include 
bookkeeping, business, com- 
puter, shorthand, typewriting, 
and vocabulary tests. 

Approximately 60 to 65 
high schools are invited to 
this event and usually around 
30 high schools participate. 



After Friday, 
ID Cards 
Cost $10 

Students are reminded that 
this Friday - Jan. 24 - is the 
last day to have ID cards 
validated and processed 
without the payment of an 
additional $10 fee, according 
to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

Photo IDs will be pro- 
cessed only on Mondaysfrom 
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 5 
to 7 p.m or by special ap- 
pointment for the duration of 
the semester, she said. 

Special sessions for even- 
ing and part-time students can 
be scheduled by calling Col- 
lege Ext. 763. 



GAMMA EPSILON TAU'l 

newly-elected offlcen ire, 

from left, Scott D. Dlcker- 

MD, treunrer; Cind; L. Kni- 

ma, Mcrelv)'; Bnice W. 

Pedenen, ind Karen 

L.Campbell, rice preiident. 

GET b an organization for 

itndeoti in graphic arti. 

ICourtesy pkolo by Kevin C. 

Slepkens, GET member/ 



T.A'^ 




M Moadir, Ju. 27, IMt • Vol. 21, No. II • 1( Pa|a 

^ ' WnUuuiMft Am CoaaiiitT CoDcfc • WiUimgport, Pi. 17711 

OTLIQHT 




Broken Valve Causes Water Shortage 



a^i'U^ 




WATER GUSHES from liydrant daring lerrice diimptlon 
lut week. [SPOTLIGHT photo by Donna L Trimble) 



By Donna L. Trimble 
Of Tlie SPOTUGHT Staff 

Some spots at the College 
were without water last 
Wednesday because city 
workers were flushing lines, 
according to Walt Nicholson, 
director of WiUiamsport 
Water Authority. 

"This was due to 
unusual circumstances because 
lines aren't generally flushed 
during the day," Nicholson 
explained. 

The city had to change 
broken valves, Nicholson add- 
ed. 

Fred Koch, food services 
manager of the Susquehanna 
Room, said, "I put signs up 
telling people not to use the 
machines (any machine in the 

Please turn to Page 13 



2a»rOTUGBTnMimdtj, Ju. 17, ItU 

MiDDLETON TO A TTEND 

IBM Workshop 



Dr. James E. Middlelon, 
dean of academic affairs, will 
attend an IBM workshop 
tomorrow in PougUeepsie, 
N.Y. 

Dr. Middleton will pre- 
sent a seminar on engineering 
and scientific computing. 

Dr. Middleton stated that 
his discussion will cover 
materials such as computer- 
aided desip (automated 
manufacturing), networking of 
equipment, and planning. 

"IBM has requested us 
to attend the workshop to 
speak to other colleges. 



demonstrating a model of one 
of the most comprehensive 
and integrated instructional 
programs," Dr. Middleton 
slated. 

He added, "This is an 
outgrowth continuing from 
IBM's recognition of the Col- 
lege's advanced technology in- 
itiatives. IBM has done two 
feature articles on the G>llege: 
one on a national level, one 
on an international level. At 
the workshop, we will serve as 
a model of leadership in the 
education of advanced 
technology." 



Leagues Forming 
Play Begins 

ABC Bowling Lanes are forming leagues for competi- 
tion. Interested students can register at the lanes. 

Leagues will start bowUng tomorrow, Jan. 28, at 4 p.m. 

Results of the league scores will be published in upcom- 
ing issues of The SPOTLIGHT as they are repotted. 

Basketball Sked Posted 

The intramural basketball schedule will be posted in the 
front entrance of Bardo Gymnasium, in the Recreation 
Center in the Lifelong Education Center and in the Sus- 
quehanna Room, according to Ms. Margot R. Bayer, stu- 
dent activities assistant. 

V-Ball Teams To Practice 

Intramural volleyball and challenge volleyball teams will 
start practice this week, according to Ms. Margot R. Bayer, 
student activities assistant. A tournament starts next Mon- 
day, Feb. 3, she said. 

Weight Training This Week 

A men's weight training clinic will be held tomonow 
and this Thursday in the weight room from 5 to 7 p.m., ac- 
cording to Ms. Margot R.Bayer, student activities assistant. 

Students may sign up in the Recreation Center office. 
Room A137, Lifelong Education Center, she said. 



SPOTLIGHT 

Vol. 21, No. 18 
Monday, J«n. 27, 1986 

The SPOTUGHT ts publi8^ed 

weekly on Monday momlnos except 

for ofnclal Cottege vacattone by )our- 

naHam and other tnterested atudenta. 

Opinions expressed are those of the 

ataff as a whole or of individual 

writers and do not reflect official In- 

HtutlonaJ oplnk}n. 

Office: Room 7, Basement, 

Academic Center Telephone: Ext. 

221. [7171326-3761. 



STAFF 

Wanna F. Brown 

Managing Editor 

Cynthia E. A. Hartranft 

Advertising Director 



Sandra L. Musgrsve 

Bureau Chief 

Academic Center 

LeRoy S. Whltmlre Jr. 

Photography Editor 

Lyie A. Wagner 

Production Coordinator 

Susan R. Kallansrud 

Bureau Chief 

Building Trades Center 

Cattierine A. Hannon 

Bureau Chief 

Learning Resources Center 

Joel J. Mader 

Bureau Chief 

Main CampusA/VeataJde 

and Sports Reporter 

Donna L. Trimble 

Staff Associate 

James E. Treese 

Chief Compositor " 

Usa E. Secrlat 

Staff Associate 

Arthur L. Straub 

Staff Artist 



STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Chris D. Miller, Sharon A. Wool. 

Oney M. Wells. Dale Lee Strange. 

Marge DINardo. Rose DINardo, and 

Diana C- VanFleet. 

Anthony N. Cllk) 

Faculty Adviser 



SPOTLIGHTaMondi;, Ju. 27, IfMOj 



Tbe College Activities budget proposal is due this Fri- 
day (Jan. 31) and all student organizations which receive 
allocations from the College activities hind must submit 
budget requests to the College Activities Office as soon as 
possible, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of College activities. 
The responsible persons within the organizations should 
send the requests to David Cunningham, Recreation Center 
assistant, in Room A137, Lifelong Education Center, she 
said, and noted that she recognized the timing of the 
reminder was late and apologized for it. 
"Anyone who has a question about the proposed 
budget or submitting requests sould call Extension 269 or 
Extension 763," she said. 



Activities 

Budget Due: 

Clubs Asked 

To SENfD Forms 



Early 
Warning 
Cards to be 
Distributed 



Early Warning Cards will 
be distributed the week of 
Feb. 3, according to Dr. 
William J. Martin, dean of 
student services. 

The cards, designed to 
help students who are not 
making satisfactory academic 
progress, will instruct students 
to take one or more measures 
to upgrade their academic 
skills. 

Examples of aid being of- 
fered are regular visits to the 



Tutorial Center, meetings with 
counselors in the Advisement 
Center, and Study Skills 
Seminars and Library Skills 
Seminars (announcement of 
dates and times forthcoming.). 

Dr. Martin stated, 
"Folks who use the Tutorial 
Center do much better than 
those who don't," and added, 
"The mstitution succeeds 
when our students learn - not 
when they don't." 



WWAS 

Appointments 
Announced 

Management position ap- 
pointments became effective 
for WWAS, the College's 
radio station today, according 
to Theresa M. Ronen, promo- 
tions director. 

Besides Ms. Ronen, other 
officers are Vincent Ceccacci, 
general manager; Mike 
Wright, assistant general 
manager; Brian J. Hill, opera- 
tions director; Rodney J. 
DiStasi, music director; Harry 
Rogers, music library coor- 
dinator; Jack Seamon, sports 
director; Anthony P. Cusate, 
pubUc service announcement 



(PSA) coordinator; Robert J. 
Beaver, program director; 
Yvette Russie, financial opera- 
tions director; James (Hector) 
Heck, alternative program 
director; Karen Ludwig, pro- 
duction director; Dennis 
Wilston, pubhc relations; 
Denise Bonomo, underwriting 
director. 

There have been a few 
changes at the station, Ms. 
•Ronen stated. There will be 
more "oldies" played per 
hour and birthday requests 
will be given. 

Anyone interested in 
working at the station should 
stop by Room BI04, Lifelong 
Education Center to fill out 
an application, Ms. Ronen 
added. 



WWAS Hours 
Announced 

WWAS, the College 
radio station, will begin 
broadcasting today at 8 a.m. 
until midnight, according to 
Theresa M. Ronen, promo- 
tions director. 

The station hours will be 
Monday through Thursday 
from 8 a.m. until midnight, 
and Fridays from 8 a.m. until 
10 p.m. 

WWAS is located in Room 
B104 in the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center (LEC). 



4DSPOTUCHrDMo«di», Ju. 27, 1»M 



College 
Receives 
Grant 

The College baj just 
received notice that it has 
been awarded a grant from 
PENN/PaClE Institute for 
development in international 
education, according to Or. 
Daniel J. Doyle, director of 
the Integrated Studies Divi- 
sion. 

The College proposed to 
further its efforts in interna- 
tional education and to 
develop them in conjunction 
with the programs that would 
be offered in the Advanced 
Technology and Health 
Sciences Center. 

The grant will provide a 
consultant to help personnel 
of the College review interna- 
tional course and education 
strategies. Dr. Doyle said. 

The grant will also pro- 
vide support for a three-day 
workshop in June at the 
University of Pennsylvania for 
four staff members of the 
College. They are Dr. 
Thomas J. Walker, assistant 
professor of political science, 
history, and sociology; Gary 
R. Knebel, instructor of com- 
puter science; Thomas J. Liv- 
ingstone, assistant professor of 
machine tool technology, and 
Dr. Doyle. 

The grant focuses on a 
region of the world, Latin 
America, and in conjunction 
with this, Dr. Walker will be 
offering a course on Latin 
American civilization. The im- 
portance is to make students 
aware of job opportunities in 
PItase turn lo Pap 7 



Whaddya' 
say...? 

Quaillon: Do you think 

ov*r*lz«d clMtai d*t*r 

Irom your iMrnlng tx- 

porlanea? 

Whoro Mkod: Technical 

Tradai Cantor 



Photot/lntarvlowi 

By 

LoRoy S. Whltmlro Jr. 

Of Tho SPOTLIGHT SUM 




David R. Bradley, secon- 
dary carprentry student from 
Wllllamsport: "It you have too 
big of a class It's hard for the 
Instructor to keep control of 
that class." 




David J. Griggs, secon- 
dary carprentry student from 
Wlllamsport: "The teacher 
cannot spend as much time 
with each Individual student 
when there Is an oversized 
class." 



Greg C. Gehret, secon- 
dary carpentry student from 
Wllllamsport: "With less peo- 
ple In the class you can get 
more out of It. But when the 
class Is full, students tend to 
get rowdy." 




Joe K. Rafter, plumbing 
student from Lock Haven: 
"Yes. When you get too 
many people In a classroom 
students begin to lose In- 
terest, In return they begin to 
talk to each other and this In- 
terferes with the conduction 
of class." 



Jerry R. Douty, secon- 
dary carprentry student from 
Wllllamsport: "Depends on 
the students. If you are In 
with the rowdies It Is going to 
be tough to learn. But, if the 
students are sensible, there 
shouldn't be too many pro- 
blems." 



SPOTUGHTOMoidij, iu. 17, INtaS 

Larger Class Sizes 
Unusual, But A Necessity 

In a relatively small Institution such as this, administrators strive to maintain a 
responsible student/teacher ratio. This semester, however, the College seems to be 
pushing that ratio to the limit: classes are larger - sometimes so large that several 
students remain standing or must obtain desks from nearby empty classrooms. 
As a result, many students find themselves In an uncomfortable situation, surround- 
ed by 30 to 40 tellow students. It Is Increasingly more difficult to gain class participation 
points and even more so to maintain that one-on-one relationship with the Instructor. 
Recently, many students began to complain that. In the long run, being part of this 
predicament might deter from their learning experience. 
Dr. James E. MIddleton, dean of academic affairs, offered reassurance that the situa- 
tion Is not as extreme as It may seem: "On the average, Instltutlon-wlde. I believe we 
have maintained a healthy student/teacher ratio - one that Is perhaps even lower than It 
has been In the past. In those Instances where too many students have been scheduled 
Into a course section, we are looking for potential room shifts. In the past, this has been a 

successful endeavor." 

Dr. MIddleton explained the unusual situation by stating that class schedules were 

set up, based on late registration enrollment figures which were substantially lower than 

projected figures used for budgeting purposes. At late registration, only 2,150 students 

had actually acknowledged their Intent to attend this semester by making payment on 

their spring billings. This figure was approximately 600 students less than the College 

had expected. 

"We did, of course, expect growth," Dr. MIddleton stated, adding, "This shortage 

was the deciding factor tor the number of courses which would be offered. In order to 

keep In line with the budget, and still keep tuition as low as possible, we offered the 

available courses to as many people who wanted them. We did not want to turn anyone 

away." 

Dr. MIddleton emphasized that Increasing the capacity of course sections can better 

meet student needs than not offering It at all, by making courses unavailable. 

Please turn to Page e 




RocKY's Qettin' Shaky 
On The Realism 

Movl* CommanI by LaRoy 8. Whltmir* Jr. 

"Rocky IV" by all means Is a blockbuster, but Is It a 

good movie? 
Sure, Stallone Is In excellent shape to portray a world 
heavyweight boxer. Okay... enough good things about the 
movie. 
This reviewer was extremely disappointed by the way 
the director portrayed the Soviet Union and the United 
States. Of course, the Soviets are the bad guys and the 
U.S. are the good guys. "Typical Hollywood". 
The bottom line Is that "Rocky IV" lacks realism. So, If 
you just want to escape from reality or have nothing else to 
do you might as go see "Pee Wee's Great Adventure". If 
If 8 buck night, of coursel 



6a8POTUGHTaMonb;. Jii. 27. IM« 



LARGER CLASSES NECESSARY 



Continued from Paoe s 

One point ot extreme Importance is that students who wish to guarantee themseives 
a seat in a particuiar course should pay for that course as early as possible. Those who 
wait and don't pay the bill until the last minute risk losing their seats. 
"We will admit that more students showed up for classes than we had thought 
would, judging by those late registration figures At last count, approximately 2,750 
students, in all, were registered," Dr. Middleton said. 
Classrooms have the capacity for 35 students per course section. Dr. Ivliddlelon has 
provided figures which indicate that the current situation is not as drastic as It seems. Ex- 
amples are: in the sociology courses, the average amount of students enrolled is 36: in 
government/history courses, the average is 33: in psychology, the average is 32.6; In 
economics, the average Is 30.2. With the exception of sociology, these figures are lower 

than the limit of 35 per classroom. 
In an age when technology Is becoming more prevalent, classrooms with more per- 
sonalized atmospheres are important to the learning process - if a rarity. 
This personal factor has always set the College apart from other institutions where 
extremely large classrooms are not uncommon. 
We realize that this has been a particularly unusual year - adjusting to the new 
sponsorship, battling budgetary problems, and canvassing for new students from outside 

the sponsorship area. 

We also understand that the College is making every attempt to make the higher 

education experience more comfortable for Its students. At this point In time, we can do 

no more than adjust to the unusually larger class sizes. But we hope this will not become 

the trend. 




ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIQHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Siueks 

Hot ami Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 



BENSON 




€MMn mini, ^ 
f^in market 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



•rttttt^tt tta 



STUDENT 
HOUSING 

Fmnished Rooms 

Singles, Donbles, 

Apirtmenls available 

ALL UnLITIES 
INCLUDED 

Showen and kitchen 
facilities 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine Ave. 

and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 

Both within one |1| 

block of WACC 

Phone 326-6536 



SPOTUGHTDMoidtr, Jn. IT, 1«Hd7 



Culinary Arts Students 
To Serve Quantity Dinners 

Culinary Arts students will serve quantity dinners in Le Jeune Chef Monday, Wednes- 
day and Thursday, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., according to Mrs. Suzann Bennett, ccordiator of 
food service. 

The meals will cost S4 per guest and desserts will be a /o carte, Mrs. Bennett added. 

Interested persons should call College Ext. 369 for reservations, she said. 



WcdMidiy, Jan. 29 

Oriental Delight 

Wonton Soup 

Chinese EggroU 

Chinese Pepper Steak 

or 

Chicken with Wahiut Sauce 

White Rice 

Stir-Fried Vegetables 

Fried Sesame Seed Roll 

Strawberry Velvet Crumb 

or 

Gingerbread 

with Lemon Sauce 

Thunday, Jtii.30 

California Cuisine 

Creamy Canot Bisque 

Fruit Fiesta Salad 

San Francisco Sour Dough 

London Broil 

with Mushroom Sauce 

Potatoes Napa Valley 

Stir Fry Vegetable Medley 

Orange Chantilly 

or 

Chocolate Marquise with 

Pistachio Cremc Anglaise 



College 
Receives 

Coniiiutd from Pagi 4 

the world market. 

The grant was written by 
Paul Petcavage, coordinator 
of grants management and 
devdopment. 



Le Jeune Chef 

■ ■ ■ Le Jeune Chef, the student-operated restaurant, 

will serve luncheons this week on Wednesday, Thursday, and 

Friday, from II a.m. to I p.m. 

Wednesday, Jan. 29 

Soup du jour - Creamy Minestone, 73 cents a cup, 85 
cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon - Hot chicken salad, soup, roll and 
beverage, $2.35. 

Special of the day - Spicy beef pie, petite tossed salad, 
rolls and beverage, S3.35. 

Desserts - Chocolate chip cheesecake, 80 cents; pies 75 
cents; and angel food cake with berry sauce, 75 cents. 

Thursday, Ian. 30 

Soup du jour - Country pumpkin cheese soup, 75 cents a 
cup, 80 cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon - Garden vegetable pita, soup, roll and 
beverage, $2.35. 

Special of the day - Stir-fried lemon honey pork, steamed 
rice with butter, herbed canots, rolls and beverage, $3.50. 

Desserts - Black forest torte, 80 cents, luscious lemon 
bars, 70 cents, assorted pies, 75 cents. 

Friday, Jan. 31 

Soup du jour - Beef vegetable soup, 75 cents a cup, 85 
cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon - Snappy slaw provolone, soup, roll and 
beverage, $3.50. 

Special of the day ~ Chicken divan, marinate vegetable 
salad, roll and beverage, $3.50. 

Desserts - Pies, 75 cents; black bottom pie, 80 cents, 
pineapple orange creme, 70 cents. 



SaSPOTUGHTDMiwdiJ, Ju. X7, H« 



This is a place 

where you can make 

lasting friendships...' 



Mrs. Judy A. Winder, manager 
of Duplicating and Mail Ser- 
vices, is a native of Greenville, Miss. 



After having spent most of her 

youth in Williamsport, Mrs. 

Winder attended the College duriiig its former 

status as The Williamsport Technical Institute 

and received a certificate in business upon 

graduation. 



Mrs. Winder became employed 

by the College in 1964 when 

she was hired as a fUm clerk. In 1976, she was 

promoted to her current position. 



A s manager of the Duplicating 
and Mail Services Department, 
Mrs. Winder is responsible for all duplicating 
done for the College, for coordinating all prin- 
ting done in the graphic arts area, for all 
ordering of supplies for printing, and for the 
overseeing of handling of all internal and ex- 
ternal mail for the College. 



Mrs. Winder is looking forward 

to moving her department to 

the new Advanced Technology and Health 

Sciences Center at the foot of Susquehanna 

Street. 



In her spare time, Mrs. Winder 
enjoys cake decorating, 
reading, bowling, and "enjoying life". She has 
taken several graphic arts courses at the Col- 
lege as well. 



Last October, Mrs. Winder 
married Robert L. Winder, 
school building inspector for the state public 
school building authority. Winder currently is 
involved with construction of the new Advanc- 
ed Technology and Health Sciences Center. 



Mrs. Winder has three children: 

Nicole, 6; Denise, 15, and 

Lorraine, 17. The family resides in 

Williamsport. 



Concerning the College, Mrs. 

Winder stated, "1 think it is a 

super place to work. 1 can't imagine working 

anywhere else. The people are great to work 

with - and 1 meet new students every 

semester. This is a place where you can make 

lasting friendships." 



BY KATHY L. COBB 

OF THE SPOTUGHT STAFF 



SPOTUGHTQMoidir, Ju. », lNta9 



SPOTLIGHT//i^... Mrs. Judy A. Winder 





MRS. WINDER... The mall gocf throngh 



lOagPOTUGHTDMoadi;, Ju. 27, l«K 



PBL ENDING Campaign, But 
Applications Still Available 



Phi BeU Lambda (PBL) 
is concluding its recruiting 
campaign for new members, 
according to Paul W. 
Goldfeder, assistant professor 
of business administration. 

To be eligible to join 
PBL, one must take at least 
one business or computer 
science related subject. 

So far membership 
figures are up over last term 
and this will be a successful 
recuiting period, stated 
Goldfeder. 

There is a table in the 
lobby of the Academic Center 
(ACQ where applications are 
available for membership. 
One can also apply in Room 
3 of the lower level of ACC. 



Plans are being discussed 
for a PBL spring social which 
will be held near the end of 
February in the Hotel 
Sheraton. 

Other schools cooperating 
with the College's PBL in- 
clude the PBL chapters at 
Mansfield University, 
Bloomsburg University, Ship- 
pensburg University, and 
Lock Haven University. 

Other plans for the 
observance of National PBL 
Week are being completed 
and will be finalized at the 
next regular meeting of the 
local chapter. 

If any PBL member 
would like to serve on any 
newly-formed committees, he 




BARRY'S 

0]pCT 7 a.m. 10 midnight 

Monday thru Friday 

Open Saturday I p.m. to 3 e.m. 

Barry says: We won't cook i barger before lu ttaie. 

Brooklyn Style Eatery 



•A UNIQUE Eating Experience 
•Best Breakfast in Town 
•arcade and pool table 
•daily specials 

234 Park SI. Just across from 
the new east parking lot 



PHONE 
323FOOD 



or she, said the adviser, 
should contact Ceylon (Lon- 
nie) S. Reinard, PBL presi- 
dent, or Richard L. Evans 
Jr., PBL vice president. 

Enrollment 
'On-line,' 
Shortfall No 
Problem 

Enrollment this semester 
is on-line, despite "a very 
slight shortfall," according to 
Dr. William J. Martin, dean 
of student services. 

Dr. Martin stated that 
projected enrollment for this 
semester was 2,800 full-time 
students. As of Jan. 17, 
enrollment totalled 2,732. 

"We have surveyed those 
students who have not 
registered for tiiis semester, 
and the major reason for not 
retiiming seems to be employ- 
ment," he added. 

Steps are being taken to 
close the slight gap. Dr. Mar- 
tin emphasized. They include 
"stepping up enrollment on 
Weekend College, and the in- 
stitiition of tiie new Mini- 
Mester," a series of ab- 
breviated, one credit courses 
to be offered in the near 
fuhire. 

(SPOTLIGHT will have 
additional information on the 
new Mini-Mester in mid- 
February.l 



SPOTLIGHTDMoidir, Ju. 17, imall 




PREPARING (he waU of a bithroom 
10 dies CM be placed are Joieph A. 
Emanuel, carpenir; slndent from 
Milford, aod Donald DeLnise, carpentry 
itudent from Bethlehem. [SPOTUGHT 
photo by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr.] 



PLACING TILES on a wall of an nn- 
flnished bathroom are George H. Shaf- 
fer, carpentry stodent from 
WUllanuport, and Paol N. Peclka, 
carpentry itndeni from New Botton. 
ISPOTUGHT photo by LeRoy S. Whit- 
mire Jr.j 




Hort Club to Sell Flowers 

The Hortkaltnrt CInb will hold a Valentlne'i Day 
Flower Sale on Friday, Feb. 14, starting at 9 a.m., in the 
Academic Center foyer and in the Sntqnehanna Room. 

The flowers will be sold In bnd Tases and in bunches. 

The sale will end when all the flowers have been sold. 



NEED AN UTILITY SHED? 

The Secondary Vocational Progam studenU are 

in the process of constructing utility sheds to be sold. 

Anyone who would like Information about these 

utility sheds or would like to order one, please con- 

Uct Mr. Jake Watts at Extension 448 or Mrs. Donna 

Simpson at 327-4773. 



llaSPOTUCBTaMMdi;, Ju. 27, IMt 



Siuqnehuiiii Room 
Mena for the Week 

The Susquehaima Room's menu for tbe week starting today, Monday, Jan. 27, is 
presented as furnished by the Susquebamia Room management. 

NlTBRikful 

Scrambled e|p, Si"; huh browns, 3S'; home 6ia, iS'; pancakes, tl.29; French toast, 99*; wafBa, 99*; 
sausage, 79*; bacon 79*. 
Dal; Salad Bar 

Salad Bar iochides Super Bowl, tomoatocs, onions, broccoU, cauliflower, gtten peppen, radishes, spinach, 
applesauce, cole slaw, eip, bacon bits, mind fruit, cottage cheese, apple butter, JeDo, potato salad, com relish. 
Dal; Saidwlcta 

Daily sandwiches include Quarter pounder,SI.23, cheeseburger, {1.33, pizza, $.35, pizza w/topping, S.70, 
American hoagie, SI. 49; frencb fries, S.3S 

Daily homemade soups will be served. 



Today, Moiday, iai. 17 
Uack 

Spaghetti t sausage, Italian 
bread J2.19; B««f pot pie, vegetable, 
S2.39. 
nucr 

Baked fish, potato k vegetable, 
$2.79; Roast pork, gravy, potato A 
vegetable, S2.59. 
Sudwickcs 

Beef salad mpiu, SI. 79; tuna 
salad, SI. 39; taco, .99. 



neiday, )ai. 11 
Luch 

Franks A sauerkraut, SI. 99; 
macaroni A cheese, vegetable, S2.I9. 
Dtaucr 

Chicken t ribs, potato t 
vegeuble, S2.89; Swedish meatballs, 
potato t vegetable, $2.39. 
gaidwkkca 

Turkey, $1.39; ham i cheese, 
S1.39; roast pork sandwich $1.39 



WcdMaday, Ju. 19 
UsKk 

Kielbassi i pierogi, potato t 
vegeuble, $2.39; turkey breast, fill- 
mg, gnvy, potato A vegetable, S2.39. 
DIucr 

Linguine/red clam sauce, Italian 
bread, S2.89; swiss steak, poUto ft 
vegetable, S2.89. 
Sudwkkcs 

Steak ft cheese, $1.79; grilled 
cheese, S.79; shrimp salad, SI .79 



ninday, Jai. 3« 
Lock 

1 isapa and ItaUan bread, 
S2.39; chopped sirloin, potato ft 
vegetable, S2.39. 
DIucr 

Chicken ft biscuits, vegetable, 
$2.39; Blled meatloaf , potato ft 
vegeuble, S2.S9 
Saidwickts 

Croissant mdt, $1.79; tuna 



salad, SI. 39; roast beef. SI. 39. 

Friday, Ju. 31 
UKk 

Beef ft peppers, potatoes ft 
vegeubles, $2.39; baked ziti, lulian 
bread, S2.19 
Saidwkkes 

Chicken salad in pita, $1.39; 
bacon club, $1.79; fried 
balopa/cheese, SI .29 



Peer Information 
and Referral Center 



If you have a pro- 
blem, come and 
talk to us whether 
the problem is big 
or small 

Complete 
Confidentiality 



ROOM 105 
GYMNASIUM 

Hours: 
Mon.-Thurs.: 

10 A.M.- 7 P.M. 

Friday: 

10 A.M.- 2 P.M. 

Closed Weekends 

Students 
helping 
fellow 

students 

Call 326-3761, Ext. 484 




MRS. 

DAHLGREN 
CONDUCTS 
WORKSHOP 

Mrs. Elizabeth A. 
DahlgrcD, assistant professor 
of business administratioD, 
conducted a workshop earlier 
this month in Williamsport. 

The workshop was entitl- 
ed "Resume Update" and 
was conducted for the Pur- 
chasing Management 
Organization of North Central 
Pennsylvania. The organiza- 
tion usually includes 30 to 33 
members. 

During her session, Mrs. 
Dahlgren gave instructions 
about how to update resumes 
in order to make them more 
attractive to potential 
employers. 

Mrs. Dahlgren has con- 
ducted two other workshops 
in the past: one on letter- 
writing and another on listen- 
ing skills. 

Broken Valve 

CouHiuudfiom Pate t 
Susquehanna Room scramble 
area that deals with water) 
because it wasn't operating 
properly, people came and 
moved the signs and used the 
machine anyway. We (the 
cafeteria staff) didn't prepare 
any foods that needed water 
last Tuesday. The steamed 
vegetables that were served 
were ah'eady done before the 
trouble staited at 9 that mor- 
ning." added Koch. 

At press time, a water 
authority worker checked the 
situation and everything was 
back to normal. "All rumors 
of contaminated water are un- 
founded," Koch said. 



SMTUCHTaMoidij, Ju. 27, in<al3 







'You 



Welcome College Students 

lovt us for lunch, we'd love you for ttiimer.' 

Serving dinner Monday thru Friday 

5 to 9 pm 

Nightly specials 

20 per cent off dinner with 

student I.D. card 

Offer good through March 1, 1986. 

Court & Willow Ca(e 

326 Court Street 

322-0135 



i 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
^/.^^ PHONE 323-7443 

S '\^J. ^ One Block from W.A.C.C. 
//^ ^ |v> DAILY SPECIALS 

_ 1 Hours: Mon.-Sil. II •.m. lo 9 p.m. CloKd Saadi; 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Regular Sub 

Meatball 

Turkey 

Ham 

Tuna 

Cheese Steak 



Whole $1.60 
Whole $1.75 
Whole $1.40 
Whole $1.80 
Whole $1.70 
Whole $2.50 



•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" 

■ ; $4 whole $2.10 half 



14a8POTUGHTaMoidt>, Jm. H. 1M* 

FHSMO TO HOLD 
SOCIAL AND MEETING 

A social half-hour wiU be held at 3 p.m. tomorrow in 
Room B 132 in the Lifelong EducaUon Center for current 
members and for other persons interested in the Food and 
Hospitality Management Student Organization. 

Following the social, the group's meeting will be held 
with Michelle R. Trout, president, presiding. 

Topics to be discussed include the FHMSO Student 
Handbook for new members, a dance in the Susquehanna 
Room, and the selling of carnations on Valentine's Day. 

The organization held its first meeting of the 
semesterlast Tuesday. 



ROOMS FOR RENT 

Clean, well-heated rooms available w/shower and kitchen. 
Newly remodeled, Across from WACC. 
$575 /semester, all utilities included. 

Call 323-3663, or inquire at: Barry's Sub Shop at 234 Park St 
lOpposite east parking loll 
ALSO: 3 bedroom apartment for rent. 



-—VALUABLE COUPON-*-| 

FREE PIZZA! 



327-8600 



Boy any aize Little Caesars 

Original round pizza at regular 

price, get the identical pizza GOLDEN STRIP 

FREE with this coupon. GIANT PLAZA 






W.A.C.C. iludcDb MTC I 
additionil 10% only with | 
itudent I.D. ud thli id. I 



Odc coopon per cgitomer. Cirrjr oil odI;. 
At pirtldpitlil loctdoni. 



© I98S Little Cuui Ettterprises, Inc. 



—COUPON— I 



WACC 

SPECIAL! 

• 

FREE 

Cold, 2-Lltre 

COKE 

with Purchase 
of Any Large 

LITTLE 

CAESARS 

SPECIAL 

5-ITEM... 

Pizza-Pizza 

(PappsronI, H*m, 

Onions, Mushroom*, 

Qrasn Popptrs) 

Cost with 

Coupon 

(This One!) 

and 10% 

Discount 

with WACC 

CARD... 

$10.80 

plus tax 

GIANT PLAZA 

QOLDEN STRIP 

327-8600 

Not Valid with Any 
Othar Coupon 



iJL. 



SPOTUGHTDMradij, Ju. 27. IMtolS 




Conitnictlon on the new Adruced Technology ind 
Healtli SdencM Center li on-Khednie, icconUng to Or. 
June* P. Rke, uiodite detn for edncadontl idrince- 
ment. "We ire itill looking it an opening date of Fill 
1987," he ilated, adding that Us itaff It preKntly InvoWed 
in completing a lyitemi analyds, which incindH facUitiet, 
cnrrlcnlnnu, itafflng, fnmltliing, initmctiiftlai iqnipnient, 
and moTlng logjitja. 



(SPOTLIGHT photoi 

By URoy S. Wliitmlre Jr.) 




16D8POTUGHTaMoidir, Ju. ". 1M« 



Bulletin Board / 



Monday, Jan. 27 thmugli Sunday, Feb. 2 



MEETINGS 

Oanmu Epsiloo Tau... noon to 1 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan. 28, Room BI07, 
Lifelong Education Center (LEO 

Hufflao Services Oub... 3:30 p.m., this Thursday, Jan. 30, Room 219, Academic 
Center. 

Student Government Association Executive Committee... 4 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Jan. 2«, Room B107, LEG. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship.. .7-10 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan. 28, Room 218, ACC. 

Food and Hospitality Management Student Organization... 3 p.m., tomorrow, Tues- 
day, Jan. 28, Room B132, LEC. 

SPOTLIGHT... 3 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan. 28, Room B107, LEC. 
UPDATE 

Pool Tournament Results.. .held week of Dec. 11, 1985 in Recreation Center; top 
finishers were Mike Ott, who received a free pizza courtesy of John Vitali, of the Sus- 
quehanna Room, and Chris Schoener, Jack Yeakei, and Kevin Bower. All four students 
will be invited to the Student Recognition Banquet to be held in the Spring. 



Bus Shelter 
To Be 

Installed 



On the south side of 
West Third Street, at Sus- 
quehanna Street, across from 
Olio's College Comer, the 
Williamsport Bureau of 
Transportation is having a 
bus shelter built. 



CUIo's 

College 
Corner 

PHONE 

322-1321 

1100 W. Third St. 
(Nexl to Academic Center) 



Your fiTorite Sobs and 
Burgers (he way yon lUe 'em 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
and win a liaif sub 

Four winners 
every week 



Com* on ovtr and get 
umtthin ' good to eall 



Open for Breal{fast 

HOURS • Mod. thru Thnn. 

7:30 a.m. Id ( p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.n 



According to Bill 
Nichols, director of transpor- 
tation at WBT, school 
students requested a shelter 
over one year ago. He said 
the bureau management felt, 
after checking ridership, that 
the shelter was wananted. 

Depending on the 
weather, it takes one day to 
dig. When they pour the ce- 
ment, it takes three days for 
that to set. Then they set up 
the bus shelter. So, the shelter 
could possibly be in place to- 
day. 

The director said the 
shelter is one of IS being set 
up in "strategic locations" at 
a cost to the city of S3,000 
each. 



Motorcycle for sale 

CB 900 Honda 1981, lUn- 
dwd shift, high and low 
range. Aildng for $2,000, 
call 322-9209 and uk for 
Bonnie. 



iOUApC ARCH/VES' 




OTLIGHT 



Moidi;, Feb. 3, IfU • Vol. 21, No. 19 • 16 Pi|ct 
WUUumiort Aim CobbuII; CoBcp • WUltuupoil, Pi. 17701 




You knew something was wrong. 
There were too many people 
standing around. There was too 
much quiet. There were too many 
faces shrouded in strain. 

The Academic Center Lounge 
was dominated by a TV picture 
What was it? A string of billowy 
smoke with caterpillar-like 
antennae... 

Whit happened? the passer-by 
asked... And a tight-lipped woman 
replied... 



The shuttle blew up! 



For retcUon oo cimpog, 
sec Page 8 



2D8POTUGHTDM<»diT, FA. 3. 1«« 

WOMEN'S WEIGHT TRAINING CLINIC 

A women's weight training clinic will be held tomorrow 
in the weight room from 4 to 5:30 p.m., according to Ms. 
Margot R. Bayer, evening College activities assistant. 

Students may sign up in the Recreation Center office, 
Room A137, Lifelong Education Center, Mrs. Bayer said. 
V-B CLINIC ON... GYM CLOSED 

Due to the volleyball chnic, the Bardo Gymnasium will 
be closed to everyone except clinic participants from 6 to 9 
p.m. today and tomorrow, according to Ms. Margot R. 
Bayer, evening College activities assistant. 

There will be no open gym during those times, added 
Ms. Bayer. 
BUT OPEN GYM IS FROM 4 TO 6 

Open Gym will be held today and toiporrow from 4 to 
6 p.m., according to Ms. Margot R. Bayer, evening College 
activities assistant. 
WOMEN'S WRESTLING CLINIC SET 

A wresthng cUnic for women will be held in the Bardo 
Gym Weight Room tomorrow from 4 to 5:30 p.m., 
according to Ms. Margot R. Bayer, evening College activities 
assistant. 

Interested women may sign up in the Recreation Center 
office. Room A137, Lifelong Education Center, she added. 
LEAGUES FORMING: PLAY BEGINS • 

The ABC Bowling Lanes is continuing to take 
participants for bowhng leagues. Competition begins 
tomorrow at 4 p.m. Those interested in bowling in the 
league should stop by or call the lanes for information. 

We goofed on GET officers list 

In our cover listing of officers of Gamma Epsllon Tau 
last »/eek, we goofed. The nevidy-elected officers of the 
printing fraternity are (and they viere pictured this way) 
Scott D, DIckerson, treasurer; Cindy L. Kuzma, secretary; 
Bruce W. Pedersen, president, and Karen L. Campbell, vice 
president. 

THE REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL 

of 

\ The Williamsport Area Community College \ 

Education Association 

will meet 

at 7 P.M. THIS Wednesday, Feb. 6 

in 

PSEA Building, S77 Montgomery Pilie, 

South Williamsport 
All Association Members are Welcome 
and Urged to Attend Council Meetings 



SPOTLIGHT 

Vol. 21, No. 19 
Monday. Fab. 3, 19(6 

TTm SPOTUQHT Is poblWiw) 

weekly on Mondty mornings except 

for offtelel CoHege vscsnons by 

toumsllsni snd other Interested 

students Opinions expressed ere 

Diose or the ststi ss s whole or a< 

Indlvldusl writers snd do not renect 

offlclsl InstltutlonsI opinlan. 

Office: Room 7, Bssement. 

Acsdemk; Center. Telephone: Ext. 

221. |717)326.37«1. 

STAFF 

Wanns F. Brown 

Msnsglng Editor 

Cynthia E A. Hsnrsntt 

Advertising Director 

Ksthy L CoPb 

Admlnistrstive ANsIrs Editor 

Editorlsl Psge Editor 

Sandrs L. Musgrsve 

Buresu CNet 

Acedsmic Center 

LsRoy S. Whltmlre Jr. 

Photogrsphy Editor 



Susan R. KsJlansrud 

Buresu Chief 

Building Trades Center 

Catherine A. Hannon 

Bureau Chief 

Learning Reaourcee Center 

Joel J. Madsr 

Bureau Chief 

Meln CampusAVestslde 

and Sports Reporter 

Donna L.Trlmtlle 

Stan Associate 

end Photographer 

Jamea E. Treses 

Chief Compositor 

Lisa E. Sscrtat 

StaH Aaaoclale 



STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Sharon A. Wool. Oney M. Wslls, 

Dale Lee Strange, Marge Dlf4ardo, 

Rose Dlh4srdo, and Diana C. 

VwFlaet. 

Anthony N. OIHo 

Faculty Adviser 



Just 

IN 

TIME: 

IT'S 

Health 
Week 



By Wanna F. Brown 
Of Tke SPOTUGHT SUA 



Health Week 1986 wiU be 
observed at the College from 
next Monday, Feb. 10 
through Thursday, Feb. 13, 
according to Mrs. Jo Ann R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities. The event is 
sponsored by the College 
Activities Office and the 
Student Health Services. 

The week starts with a 
cancer screening of the bowel, 
to be held next Monday 
through the courtesy of the 
Williamsport Hospital. The 
screening will be held in 
Room 105 of the Gym. 

On that day, too, a 
lecture on AIDS will be given 
from 11 a.m. to noon in the 
Academic Center Auditorium 
by Dr. Gary Lattimer, 
infectious disease health 
officer for the city of 
Williamsport. 

On next Tuesday, a 
seminar on Drunk Driving: 



SPOTUGHTQMoidi;, Feb. 3, 1»Wd3 

The law as it Pertains to 
Pennsylvania vrill be 
conducted by Trooper Paul 
W. Baclawski, of the 
Pennsylvania State PoUce. It 
will be from 11 a.m. to noon 
in the Academic Center 
Auditorium. 

On Wednesday, a 
diabetes screening by the 
student nurses organization 
(SNOW) of the College will 
be conducted from 11 a.m. to 
2 p.m. in Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Ending the week will be a 
presentation on Drunk 
Driving: The Effects by Dr. 
Sheldon Brotman, 
traumatologist at the 
Geisinger Medical Center. 

All programs are free 
and are open to students, 
faculty, staff, and the 
community - except the 
cancer screening, which is not 
available to the community. 



Send a message to your Sweetheart ff ^ 
week in SPOTLIGHTS special column 

1 a message to your sweetheart from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 4 



next week in 



Send a message to your sweetheart from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 4 
- and help the Lycoming County Blind Association. 

SPOTLIGHT staffers will set up tables in the first floor of the Academic Center 
Cmside the swinging doors) and in the Lifelong Education Center lobby at the Susquehanna 
Room entrance. 

There, the staffers will take messages to be pubUshed in next week's SPOTLIGHT. 

Forms may be filled out at the tables. A three-line message is 50 cents, with a 
25-letter limit per line. 

A validated ID must be shown and name and curriculum must be given, according to 
Anthony N. Cillo, SPOTLIGHT adviser, who noted that the newspaper also is legally 
bound to refuse inappropriate material. 

Half of the proceeds from the special activity wiU be donated to the Lycoming County 
Blind Association 



Ll£ 



^ 




4asPOTUGHTaMMi4ij, r<fe. }, ini 

TREES ARE 

IMPORTANT, 

TOO: 

THANKS, 

GUYS! 



Commtntary by Donni L.Trimbla, of Th* SPOTLIGHT Staff 

"Grounds maintenance crews are being kept extremely busy this time of the year," 
said Eugene I. RIcker. groundskeeper/crew chief at the College. 

Besides doing a superb job of snow removal from all the sidewalks and parking lots, 
the crews have to protect all of the shrubbery from frost, snow, damage, and vandalism 
by students. 

RIcker received a call from Security on Friday, Jan. 24, that an accident had 
occurred at the corner of Vine Avenue and Susquehanna Street - resulting In damage to 
an oak tree. 

RIcker and Michael H. Miller, also of the College maintenance team, smoothed It 
down and trimmed the bark and rough edges. Then the two of them painted the 
damagaC area with polyurethane. RIcker said It would require several more coats before 
Spring. If the polyurethane Is not painted on the damaged area, when Spring arrives the 
sap would Instead seep out of the wound Instead of rising up Into the limbs. 

Among Rlcker's responsibilities Is the care and upkeep of the entire collection of 
Indoor plants. 

RIcker added that the students could contribute to maintaining an attractive college If 
they would refrain from llti^rlng and damaging shrubbery. 

In this writer's opinion, RIcker and his crew should be commended for a job well 
donel 



Lucky: The success isn't just luck 



Book rovlew by Kathy L. Cobb, of Th* SPOTLIGHT Staff 



As the sequel to the 
novel. Chances, which 
described the trials, tribula- 
tions and successes of 
powerful Italian Immigrant 
GIno Santangelo, Jackie Col- 
lins' new book. Lucky, 
describes the wealth, power, 
ruthlessness and beauty of 
GIno's daughter. Lucky. 

The novel Is packed with 
characters and all of them 
are relevant to Lucky's 
existence: Olympla, the best 



existence: Olympla, the best 
friend of Lucky's youth who 
would come to hate her; 
DImltrl, Olympla's father and 
Lucky's multl-mllllonalre, 
unfaithful husband, and 
Lennle Golden, the small-time 
comedian who suddenly hits 
the big time and falls for 
Lucky In an equally big way. 
Lucky struggles for her 
Independence throughout the 
novel, but underlying her 



motives Is always the same 
desire: to gain her father's 
love and support, which, one 
way or another, has always 
been denied her. 

Fast-paced and 
entertaining, i.uc*y delves 
Into the life of an 
adventurous, powerful young 
woman. The novel Is a 
success - and possibly the 
best of Collins' works. 



Turn to Page 7 for additional commentary i 



SPOTUGHTDMoidir, Feb. 3. IfUaS 



Whaddya' Say...? 

Photos by Donna L.Trimble and LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. 
Both of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Interviews by Susan R. Kallansrud and LeRoy S. Whltmlre Jr. 

Both of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Where Asked: 

Professional Develotiment Center/Susquehanna Room 

Question: 

What are you giving your sweetheart 

for Vaientine's Day? 




Celeste A. Matthews, dental 
hygiene student from 
Lewlstown: "Bake him a cake 
and give him a card." 



Rick L. Carpenter, construction 
carpentry student from Port 
Allegheny: "A diamond ring." 



Susan K Baumer, quantity 
foods student from Hughesvil 
"...Box of candy and a rose.' 




1 .^a 

Judy A. Spong, food and 
hospitality management student 
from Jersey Shore: "Nothing. I 
don't have a sweetheart. But If I 
did, I would give him myself." 




Ivan D. Swartz, refrlgeratlon/air 
conditioning student from 
Miffllntown: "A dozen roses and 
a quiet romantic dinner 
together." 



George H. Shaffer, construction 
carpentry student from 
Wllllamsport: "Flowers, a card, 
and a kiss." 



6a8POTUGHTaMoid«T. f*- 3. <M< 

IT'S PBL WEEK! 

Williamsport mayor to sign proclamation tomorrow 



National Phi BeU 
Lambda Weeic will be 
observed next Sunday through 
next Saturday with the 
College's chapter participating 
in various activities 
throughout the week, 
according to Paul 
W.Goldfeder, assistant 
professor of business 
administration and adviser to 
the College chapter. 

Tomorrow, Williamsport 
Mayor Stephen J. Lucasi will 
sign a proclamation 
recognizing the importance of 
the youth of the nation and 
the continued vitality of the 
business structure of America 



through the development of 
PBL men and women. 

The purpose of the 
organization is to further 
develop leadership, encourage 
cooperation, promote good 
citizenship, teach up-to-date 
business iriformation and to 
inspire patriotism among its 
members. 

Many activities are 
scheduled to take place during 
the week of observance. 

During a recent meeting, 
a social committee was 
appointed with Susan R. 
Kallansrud, a journalism 
student from Williamsport, 
designed as chairperson. 



.^saft»i ts &g9g « i 




ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIQHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Snaeks 

Hoi and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gtsoline 



BENSON 




Offt mini. ^ 
fitn market 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



: . T i t c :tt»(cvfrCTT 



Serving irith her are 
Brenda J. Wolfe, computer 
science student from 
Montoursville; Barbara E. 
Bratton, a business 
management student from 
Montoursville; Lisa Ann 
Folmar, business management 
student from Montoursville, 
and Lori Staisiak, legal 
secretarial student from 
Williamsport. 

The organization 
completed its membership 
drive with over 20 new 
members joining the College 
chapter. Goldfeder called the 
drive a success. 

PBL is planning a ski 
trip to Ski Sawmill this 
Saturday (Feb. 8). Goldfeder 
said anyone interested in 
attending may sign up in 
Room 3 of the Academic 
Center. 

The book sale is com- 
pleted, he reported, and per- 
sons having books in the PBL 
room in the basement of the 
Academic Center should pick 
them up. If books are not 
picked up, the adviser said, 
they will be donated to 
libraries in the county. 

The next chapter meeting 
will be at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow 
in Room 329, Academic 
Center with Ceylon (Lonnie) 
Reinard, president, presiding. 



Help keep 

America 

looking 

good. 



^ ^ Commentary continued from Page 4 

Singles of '85: 
bottom of the barrel 



CommanUry on mualc 

By JamM K. Morrlisay of Th* SPOTLIQHT StaH 

Out of the many pop singles unleashed on the record- 
buying public In 1 985, these 1 stand out as the least 
fondly rennembered: 

10. You Spin Me Round (Dead or Alive) 
9. In and Out of Love (Bon Jovl) 
e. Super Bowl Shuffle (Chicago Bears Shufflln' Crew) 
7. Election Day (Arcadia) 
6. Sara (Starship) 
5. Everyday (James Taylor) 
4. Oh Sheila (Ready for the World) 
3. Everybody Dance (Ta Mara and The Seen) 
2. Object of My Desire (Starpoint) 
1 . Loverglr! (Teena Marie) 



The campy Dead or Alive deserve actual praise for 
succeeding at deliberate awfuiness. Bon Jovl came on 
fairly raunchy but his calculated pretty-boy pop-rock rivalled 
the Osmond Brothers In animal ferocity. 

The Chicago Bears managed to beat the deadline and 
make a fairly strong showing late In the year. There's no 
point In making unkind comments about the song because 
these boys are quite capable of doing their own bad- 
rapping. 

Arcadia qualified for the Nonsensical Merit Award of 
1 985. Election Day defied any attempts to understand what 
on earth Simon LeBon was unbearably whining about. On a 
worse note (If thaf s possible) it was easy to figure out the 
Starship's rewrite of a Sanka commercial since they made 
plenty of reference to "brewing". 

James Taylor made a definite comeback of sorts by 
giving an unusually lifeless (even for him) version of a 
Buddy Holly classic. 

And next time Prince sics his bodyguards on anyone, 
lef 8 hope It's those fine folks from Ready For The World 
and Ta Mara and The Seen. 

They ripped off His Royal Badness's funk style -even 
using the same sort of drum machine flourishes. 

But for the real pop pits. It was pretty hard to top the 
ad lib screaming and yelling of Starpoint. Teena Marie did 
the same thing but the little lady won out because she 
wrote and produced her monstrosity. Your bar of Karen 
Slikwood Shower Soap Is In the mall, Teena. Use It 
liberally. 



SPOTUGHTaMonIa;, Feb. 3, intD? 

Faculty, 

Staff 

Attend 

Weekend 

Seminar 

Several Business and 
Computer Technologies 
Division employees attended 
the first of a series of 
weekend seminars held at the 
College. The first seminar was 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 
25. 

The seminar was 
conducted by the Center for 
Business and Industrial 
Advancement and was 
presented by Linda Craner, 
president of Dynamic 
Dimensions, which does 
management and leadership 
training skills seminars. 

Mrs. Ruby Hayes, 
assistant professor of business 
administration; Mrs. Doreen 
Shope, assistant professor of 
business administration; Miss 
Patricia Shoff, associate 
professor of business 
administration, and Mrs. 
Gloria Valencik, division 
secretary, attended the 
seminar. 

Topics discussed included 
building success attitudes, 
time management^ handling 
employee trustration, 
leadership quaUties, 
performance appraisals of 
employees, and non-verbal 
communications. 

Miss Shoff commented 
that it was a worthwhile 
seminar and that she would 
be interested in fiiture 
seminars which promote 
personal and professional 
enrichment. 



SaspoTUGHTaMonUj, r*. 3, \m 



What is your reaction to the space shuttle tragedy? 

Asked in the Academic Center Lounge and elsewhere on 
Main Campus on Tuesday, Jan. 28, the day of Americans 
worst space exploration disaster. 



Robert J. Shide, general 
studies student from 
Hepbumville: "It's surprising 
that this happened, but 
then... it's not - especially 
with all the problems they've 
been having recently." 



Anu M. Anil, human 
services student from Muncy: 
"It's very tragic. When I 
heard it on the radio, I 
couldn't beheve it." 



Steven T. Vittorio, machine 
tool technology student from 
Cogan Sution: "With all the 
modem technology, it's hard 
to beheve something Uke that 
could take place." 



David A. Kuhner, commer- ■ 
cial refrigeration and air con- 
ditioning student from 
Shamokin: "I feel sorry that 
it happened; there might be 
some foul play involved." 



Jeff A. HiytoD, electronics 
student from State G)llege: "I 
think it's a shame." 



Sdmd R. Hoopea, electronics 
student from Franklin: "I'm 
shocked!" 



Miry J. RumDuen, Student 
Records Office receptionist: 
"I'm shocked... numb. I'm 
thinking of the civilians being 
along and their children 
watching." 



Patty A. Weigle, general 
studies student from 
WiUiamsport: "I think's 
awful. It's hard to explain. I 
think of the school teacher 
and the children she has. I 
think of her students. They 
must be devastated." 



Joiepb E. Sanzotto: computer 
science student from 
Shamokin: "I just couldn't 
believe it happened with all 
the safety checks involved. 



SPOTUGHTDMoadir, Feb. 3, \nKj9 



Roger p. Johmon, electrical 
occupations student from the 
Kane area: "bn surprised it 
happened - especially with 
technology today and all the 
knowledge we have in that 
area." 



DtTld P. Jones, electrical 
occupations student from 
WiUiamsport: "I'm shocked it 
could happen - especially 
with today's technology." 



Tiyni J. Boone, retail 
management student from 
Loganton: "My reaction is 
disbelief. It's something you 
don't expect to happen with 
the advanced technology we 
have today." 



Ken F. Fenstermtcber, elec- 
tronics student from Mon- 
tgomery: "It's really terrible. 
You'd think with all the safe- 
ty features, it wouldn't have 
happened." 



Ctnnen M. Femn, graph! 
arts student from Lock 
Haven: "Sad. They didn't 
have a chance." 



Chris L. Fredin, electrical 
technology student from 
Loyalsock: "It's kind of 
strange that the first flight 
you take a civiUan on, 
something tragic happens. The 
flights aren't as routine as we 
think they are." 



Greg W. Kortz, electrical 
occupations student from 
Williamsburg: "For something 
as wide and as publicized as 
the space shuttle, it's strange 
that this would happen." 



Lori ArnDBTO, retail 
management student from 
Lock Haven: "It's really 
weird it would happen now 
since it's the first flight with a 
civiUan." 



Mttt L. MItcheU, food and 
hospitality management 
student from Wellsboro: 
"They hurried the schedule 
along too far. They should 
have checked things out 
better." 



Inleirlews 

By 

Sindn L. Masgnve 

and 

Brtndi L. VIbert 

Both of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



10D8POTUGHTDM»rti», r*. J, \m 

Academic Calendar Revised: 

Check Your Student Handbook 

Calendar...It's Different! 

The College's official calendar was changed due to a successful attempt to save energy, 
according to Dr. William J. Martin, dean of student services. The College was closed down 
and all the thermostats were turned down during the extended Christmas vacation, Dr. 
Martin said. 

The revised academic calendar for this semester is: 

Feb. 3 through 14, classes; Feb. 17, winter vacation/snow make-up day; Feb. 18 
through 28, classes; March 3 through 26, classes; March 27, staff development day; march 
28, Easter vacation; March 31, classes; April I through 30, classes; May 1 and 2, classes. 

Important dates include March 11, mid-term grades due; march 16, Open House; 
May 5, final grades due; May 6 through 9, faculty activities, and May 10, commencement. 



WHO OR WHAT IS... 
QW.A.C.C? 



S»,i!»«t*Ss<«i«SWW 




BARRY'S 

Open 7 a.m. lo midnight 

Monday Ihni FrUty 

Open Saturday I p.m. to i a.m. 

Barry says: We woa't cook i bwgcr before Hi Uae. 

Brooklyn Style Eatery 



•A Unique Eating Experience 
•Best Breakfast in Town 
•Arcade and Pool Table 
•Daily Specials 

234 Park SI. Just across from 

PHONE "*' "** ""' Pi^ng '»• 

323FOOD a 




STUDENT 
HOUSING 

Fnniiihed Roonu 

Sincki, Doubles, 

Apartmeiits aTailable 

ALLUnUTIES 
INCLUDED 

Showen and Idtchen 
fadUlJes 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine Ave. 

and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 

Both within one [1] 

block of WACC 

Phone 326-6536 



SPOTUGHTQMoilir, Ftk. 3, IMtoll 



Sasqaehanna Room 
MeoD for the Week 

The Susquehanna Room's menu for the week starting today, Monday, Feb. 3, is presented 
ai furnished by the Susquehanna Room management. 

Dili; Breildul 

Scnmbled ens, 39*; huh browu, SS'; home fries, 55'; pancakes, $1.29; French tout, 99'; waffles, 99*; 
ansaie, 79*; bacon 79*. 

Dall; Salad Bar 
Silad Bar includes Super Bowl, tomoatoes, onions, broccoli, cauliflower, green peppers, radishes, spinach, 
■ppicsiuce, cole slaw, eggs, bacon bits, mixed fruit, cottage cheese, apple butter, Jello, potato salad, com relish. 
DaOr Saadwlckei 
Daily landwicbes include Quarter pottnder,$l.25, cheeseburger, SI.33, pizza, S.SS, pizza w/lopping, S.70, 
American hoagie, SI.49; french fries, $.55 
Daily homemade soups will be served. 

Sandwkka 
Fish sandwich, $1.29; meatball 
hoagie, $1.59; bam BBQ, $1.25. 
Tne«la;, Feb. 4 
UiBck 
Roast chiclien, gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.39; sausage calabrese, 
Italian bread, $2.39. 
Dliner 
Bake filled pork chops, potato 
and vegetable, $2.39; fisb and chips, 
vegeuble. $2.39. 



Ttdiy, Moadi;, Feb. 3 
Luck 

Breaded pork chop.gravy, 
potato, and vegeuble, $2.39; Ham 
ud clteeae omdet, home fries, toast, 
S2.I9. 

Uucr 

Mcatloaf, gnvy, potato, and 
veidable, $2.59; BBQ ribs, gravy, 
potato, and vegetable, $2.89. 



Peer Information 
and Referral Center 

ROOM 105 
GYMNASIUM 

Hours: 
Mon.-Thurs.: 

10 A.M. - 7 P.M. 

Friday: 

1 A.M. - 2 P.M. 

Closed Weekends 



Students 
helping 
fellow 
students 

CaU 326-3761, Ext. 484 



If you have a pro- 
blem, come and 
talk to us whether 
the problem is big 
or small 

Complete 
Confidentiality 




Saidwlcket 
Meatloaf, $1.29; turkey, $1.59; 
tuna, $1.59. 

Wedicsday, Feb. S 
Uick 
Linquine/red clam sauce, Italian 
bread, $2.59; Salisbury steak, potato 
and vegetable, $2.39. 
Dluer 
Filled chicken breast, gravy, 
potato t vegetable, $2.79; deep sea 
delite, potato & vegeuble, $2.95. 
Sudwkfcct 
Egg salad, $1.29; chicken 
hoagie, $1.59; Uco, $.99. 

Tkinday, Feb. ( 
Lunck 

Macaroni & cheese, vegetable, 
$2.19; pork stir fry over rice, $2.39. 
Dliner 
Spaghetti napilitano, sm. salad 
bar, ItaUan bread, $2.89; beef pot 
pie, vegetable, $2.39. 
Saadwicko 
Steak & cheese, $1.79; B.L.T., 
$1.59; roast pork, $1.59. 
Frida;, Feb. 7 
Liick 
Riptoni in meat sauce, Italian 
bread, $2.19; fish nuggets/macaroni 
i cheese, cole slaw, $1.59. 
Saidwlcket 
Grilled cheese, $.79; turkey 
hoagie, $1.79. 



Contributions for next 
week's issue of Horizons 
still being accepted in The 
SPOTUGHT Office, base- 
ment. Academic Center. 



12aSrOTUGHTaMoa4ar. Fck. }, IM« 



Weatherization 

Program 

Progressing 



By Susan R. KaUmsrud 
Of He SPOTUGHT Staff 

SPOTLIGHT photos 
By Donna L Trimble 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



A weatherization training 

program is underway for the 

second year at the College. 

The program is not 

offered to currently enrolled 

students in general, but 

instead to about 700 

individuals in subsidized 

employment. 

The first week of 

instruction began Jan. 28 and 

is expected to continue 

through February 1987. 

Started in Fau 

The program was initially 

started in Fall 1984 through 

the Department of 

Community Affairs with an 

award to the College of a 

grant for $88,791 with the 

amount increasing to between 

$102,000 and $112,000 for 

1986. 

The grant provides for 

the training of persons who 

will then weatherize low 

income and elderly families' 

homes. 

The College won the 

grant through competitive 

bidding with other community 

colleges and agencies. 

The College's reputation 

in providing high quality 

technical training was also a 

deciding factor, according to 

College officials. 

Individuals irill come to 

Williamsport from all over the 

state for training. 



Training Center in Cmr 

With the training center 

in Williamsport, it is viewed 

as a plus for both the College 

and the community - adding 

greatly to the overall 

economic growth of the area. 

Not only will materials and 

supplies to run the program 

be purchased locally, but also 

the participants in the 

program will be required to 

stay here for the four-day 

program each week. 

It is estimated that 

between $175 to $225 per 

week for lodging, board, 

transportation, recreation, and 

food will be spent by each 

individual. 

About 55 agencies 

throughout the state perform 

weatherization services to a 

crew of men and women 

between the ages of 18 and 

62. These individuals are 

employed by the agencies 

doing the work. Certification 

in estimating, purchasing, and 

warehousing as well as 

analysis are available to the 

students with advance courses 

offered in heating and weather 

program management. 

Properties Included 

Weatherization to 

qualified properties will 

include such improvements as 

caulking, weather-stripping, 

insulation, glass replacement 



in storm windows, attic 

insulation and some basement 

insulation, resulting in less 

beating costs. 

Sixteen hundred dollars 

worth of materials and labor 

is allocated for each qualified 

individual's home. By using a 

two-to-three-man crew, work 

to the individual's home can 

be completed in one day. 

Richard M. Sarginger, 

coordinator of the 

weatherization program, 

instructors, and a lab 

assistant will utilize Mondays 

to prepare for the week - to 

set up work areas, to get 

mock-ups ready for new 

students, and to make sure 

supplies and materials are on 

hand. 

On Tuesdays, new 

students will arrive for classes. 

Before training begins, 

students will be pre-tested to 

determine what knowledge 

they may already have and 

what areas they need to work 

on most. 

The remainder of the first 

day as well as the second and 

third days will be spent on 

lecture and hands-on training. 

Practicvm on Friday 

Most of Friday will be 

devoted to sunmiarization and 

testing. Students will take an 

extensive written test and a 

lab practicum. They will be 

>■ >■ ^ PAGE 13 >■ ^ >■ 



SPOIUGBTaMndi}, Fck. 3, IMinlS 



Weatherization 

Program 

Progressing 

-»■—■ -FROM PACE 12 



presented a completion 
certification when all 
requirements have been met. 
The four-day sessions will 
include 28 hours of 
instruction. The maximum 
amount of time any one 
individual will spend on the 
program is four non- 
consecutive weeks. 
Mock-ups of eight 
houses, windows, and doors 
plus six rooms with mock 
floor systems and hot water 
display trainers were 
constructed by the College 
carpentry students. Students 
will use the College's modem 
facilities in the air 
conditioning and refrigeration, 
the carpentry, and the 
plumbing labs. Audio-visual 
materials will also be utilized 
in classroom instruction. 
Graist Funded 
Since the program is 
grant-funded, the 
Weatherization Training 
Center won't cost the College 
- nor the city - a cent to 
establish or operate. Not only 
will the Department of 
Community Affairs provide all 
funding, it will also be the 
screening agency for students. 
The College does not become 
involved at all in recruitment 
or enroUment. 
Sarginger stated that 
anyone seeking home 
weatherization should contact 
the local STEP office for an 
application. 





14a8POTUGHTnMM4iir, TA. 3. IMt 

.—COUPON— 1 



WACC 

SPECIAL! 

• 

FREE 

Cold, 2-Lltre 

COKE 

with Purchase 
of Any Large 

LITTLE 

CAESARS 

SPECIAL 

5-ITEM... 

Pizza-Pizza 

(Papparonl, Ham, 

Onlont, Muthroomt, 

QrMn Pappart) 

Cost with 

Coupon 

(This One!) 

and 10% 

Discount 

with WACC 

CARD... 

$10.80 

plua tax 

GIANT PLAZA 

GOLDEN STRIP 

327-8600 

Not Valid with Any 
Othar Coupon 



Regional Leadership 

CONfFERENCE 

Set for Feb. 24; 
Students Welcome 

The Philadelpha Regional Leadenhip Conference 1986 
will b« held at Cedar Crest College, AUenwood, on Saturday, 
Feb. 22, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., according to Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

The Iceynote speaker will be Dr. Mark vanderHeyden, 
dean of faculty at the College, who will lecture on "Synergy: 
Working Together". 

Four workshops will be held with topics such as prac- 
tical parliamentary procedure", "how to get a committee", 
"alternative to alcohol in programming", "campus com- 
munication", "campus communication", "time 
management", and "stress and weUness programs". 

The cost is $14 per person if paid by Feb. 14 and $16 after 
that date. This price includes coffee break, luncheon, workshop 
materials, and reception. 

Interested student organizations and advisers should call 
College Ext. 763 for further information, Mrs. Fremiotti said. 



-—VALUABLE COUPON"- 

FREE PIZZA 

Buy any size Little Caesan 

Original ronnd pizza at regular 

price, gel the identical pizza GOLDEN STRIP 

FREE with thii coupon. GIANT PLAZA 



327-8600 



Wry ptnMiiiari. J 



W.A.C.C. itodenti lave 
addidonil 10% oily wttk 
student I.D. ud (Ui id. 



One coopon |icr cuilomer. Can; oil onl;. 
At putkipidni locittom, 



© I9IS Little Caov Eiutpraa, lac. 



SrOTUGHTOMiMdV, Fcfe. 3, IMtolS 



Culinary Arts Students 
To Serve Quantity Dinners 

Culinary Arts students will serve quantity dinners in Le Jeune Chef Monday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., according to Mis. Suzann Bennett, 
coordiator of food service. 

The meals will cost $4 per guest and desserts will be a /a carte, Mrs. Bennett added. 

Interested persons should call College Ext. 369 for reservations, she said. 



B hat's llaliano 
WcdMtdi}, Feb. S 

Minestrone Soup 

Frob Spiuch Salad Topped with 

Hot Bacon Dressing 

Chicken Cacciatore 

or 

Veal Parmigiana * 

Pasta Romano 

Buttered BroccoU Spean 

Italian Garlic Bread 

Zuppa Inglese 

or 

Frozen Chocolate Cream Cake 

* Cook to order item Additional S.SO 

nuida;, Feb. i 

Imperial Consomme 

Pheonix Tail Salad with Eastern 

Oreen Salad Dressing 

Chicken with Lemon Sauce 

or 

Peking Spareribs 

Oriental Rice 

Breadsticks/Fortune Cookies 

Eight Treasures Pudding 

or 

Florentine Frozen Ice Cream with 

Fniit 



The Bloodmobile 
will be on the 
Earth Science 
Campus, Allen- 
wood, from 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m., 
March 13. 



Le Jeune Chef 

■ ■ 1 Le Jeune Chef, the student-operated resturaunt, will serve 
luncheons this week on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, 
from II a.m. to I p.m. 



Wednesday, Fd>. 5 

Soup du jour - Split pea, 75 cents a cup, 80 cents a 
bowl. 

Light luncheon - Bacon and egg bean salad, soup, roll 
and beverage, $2.35. 

Special of the day - Cranberry orange pork steak, curried 
rice, asparagus with sunshine sauce, rolls and beverage, $3.25. 

Desserts - Chocolate fondue, 75 cents; pies 75 cents; and 
baked apples, 75 cents. 

Thttnday, Feb. 6 

Soup du jour - French onion soup, 75 cents a cup, 80 
cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon - Creamy Swiss salad, soup, roll and 
beverage, $2.35. 

Special of the day - Chicken paprika, buttered noodles, 
green beans ceaser, rolls and beverage, $3.25. 

Desserts - Fiesta fruit plate, 80 cents, luscious grapes and 
pineapple, 75 cents, assorted pies, 75 cents. 

PHday, Feb. 7 

Soup du jour - Beefy appetizer soup, 75 cents a cup, 80 
cents a bowl. 

Light luncheon - Florentine salad, soup, roll and 
beverage, $2.25. 

Special of the day - Steak diane, soup, petite tossed 
salad, roll and beverage, $3.50. 

Desserts - Pies, 75 cents; dream puff sundaes, 80 cents, 
cherry berries on a cloud, 80 cents. 



FOOD 



16DSP0nJGHTaMo«(lij, F*. 3, IfU 



Bulletin Board / Monday, pa. J Oimigh Sunday, pa. 9 



MEETINGS 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... noon to 1 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 4, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center (LEC) 

Student Government Assodation Executive Coimnittee... 4 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Feb. 4, Room B107, LEC. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship. ..7-10 p.m., this Wednesday, Feb. 5, Room 218, ACC. 

SPOTLIGHT... 3 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 4, Room B107, LEC. 

Student Government Association SenaU... 5 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 4, Room 
BI07, LEC. ,„ ,^^ 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 4, Room 329, ACC. 
ACTIVITIES 

Civil Technology Club... drawing to be held this Thursday, Feb. 6; interested persons 
may check with Lament Butters, Ext. 272, or in Room 108, Building Trades Center. 

Ski trip... bus leaves the Learning Resources Center bus loop at 5 p.m. this Wednes- 
day, Feb. 5; sign up in the Recreation Center, Room A137, Lifelong Education Center. 

Ice skating... bus leaves the LRC bus loop this Thursday, Feb. 6, at 5:30 p.m.; sign 
up in the Recreation Center, Room A137, LEC. 

Cross-country skiing... 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., this Thursday, Feb. 6, White Deer Run 
Golf Course, Allenwood; bus leaves LRC bus loop at 3 p.m.; sign up in the Recreation 
Center office. Room A137, LEC 



Employment Opportunities 



Ittomuim a ptmiM by IV Collcit Plactmnl QSict ptrxinul in Iht Leamnf Resoums Cnur. Induirits should bt ilnOed 
10 Ihm dKl not K His im/spcptr. 



Gym supervisor... Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 9 to 11 p.m., J3.50 an hour. 
Would supervise activities, keep records and clean up afterwards. Call Bonnie Mahoney at 
the Williamsport Recreation Commission, 326-2831. 



Cillo's 

College 
Corner 

PHONE 

322-1321 



1100 W. Third St. 

(Next to Academic Center) 

Comt on over and gel 
somethln' good to tall 



Your fiTorite Snbs and 
Bargtn the way yoo liiie 'em 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half sub 



Four winners 
every week 



Open for Breakfast 

HOURS • Mod. thru Than. 
7:30 i.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



WACCEA 
COUNCIL 
TO MEET 
WEDNESDAY 

The Representative 
Council of the Williamsport 
Area Community College 
Education Association 
(WACCEA) will meet at 7 
p.m. this Wednesday in the 
offices of the Pennsylvania 
State Education Association, 
577 Montgomery Pike, South 
Williamsport. 

WACCEA president John 
K. Hammond, associate 
professor of automotive 
mechanics, said the meeting is 
a regularly-scheduled one and 
is open "to all members of 
the association". 



Sft/ACC ARCHIVES 



^^ r^i-^Z^iSiitiS 



Happy 

Valentine's 

Day! 



See Pages 16 & 17 





91 Moi4i;, Fck. 1*, 1M( • Vai. U, No. M • 32 Pifn 

^^' WUuuvoil Ara OMniiHr Caltp • WHnuyoil, Pi. 177(1 



POTLIGHT 



gs*8»«wM««!-,«s'«'< ■!-'*««s«r«' 



3MS^^ <?i 




HAVE WE GOT 

NEWS FOR YOU! 

...This Issue: 

A Revelation 

about 

Stephen King 

...Bowling results 

...Women's Week 

...Study Seminars 

..AND MOREl 



PROCLAMATION declaring this week National Phi Beta 
Lambda Week was signed by Mayor Stephen J. Lncasi at 
City Hall last Monday. From left are Ceylon S. (Lonnie) 
Relnard, PBL president; Paul W.Goldfeder, PBL adviser; 
Mayor Lncasi, and Richard L. Evans, PBL vice president. 
See related story, Page 29. /SPOTLIGHT pholo by LeRoy 
S. Whitmire Jr.j 



->■« • 'J.^ 



iDSPOTUGHTDMoidiy, Feb. II, I»M 

Regional leadership 
conference is Feb. 22; 
registration still open 

Comcting the record: Date wrong last wttk 
The Philadelphia Regional Leadership Conference 1986 

will be held at Cedar Crest College, Allenwood, on 

Saturday, Feb. 22 - not on the date reported erroneously in 

a headlioe last week. 

The cost is $14 per person if it is paid by this Friday, 

Feb. 14. After that, the cost is $16. The price includes 

coffee break, luncheon, workshop maurials and reception. 
Interested student organizations and advisers may call 

College Ext. 763 for additional information, said Mrs. 

JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 



This Friday Last Day 
For May Grads Petition 

This Fridiy, Feb. 14, ia the lut day for those 
pliDDlng to be gndnited thli May to flk a "petitloii to 
gradnale" at the Stndent Record! Window, Academic 
Center. 
The petition to gradnate ii neceisary, according io 
Records Office personnel, "in order for credentfads Io be 
eviinated". 
Until this Friday, there is a $5 fee. This, the 
Records Office announcement states, Is to cover the cost 
of printing the diploma. The announcement points out 

that it is not necessary to order a diploma but 

emphasizes that it is necessary to compete a petition. 

After this Friday, there will be a $10 fee to order 

diplomas and those diplomas will be deUvered later than 

others order prior to the deadline. 



Correct times for Health Week 

In a report about Health Week, informatioD about the AIDS clinic 
tnd about the Dniok Driviiig Seminar was Incorrect. The correct 
lilbnnatioa ii: 

AIDS clinic, 10 a.m. to II a.m., today, Monday, Feb. 10. 

Dnink Driving Seminar, noon Io 1 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 
11. 



Tides twisted 

A Jan. 27 report about management positions at 
WW AS, the College's student-operated radio station, was 
incorrect. The correct information is: Vincent Ceccacci, 
general manager; Craig Hower, assistant general manager, 
and Mike Wright, news director. 



SPOTLIGHT 

Vol. 21, No. 20 
Monday, Feb. 10, 1986 

Th« SPOTUOHT 19 publl9(i«d 

weeWy on Monday momlnga except 

for official College vacation! by 

Joumallam and ott>ef Intereated 

atudents. Oplnlona expreaaed are 

thoee of ttw ataff aa a whole or of 

Individual wrlterB and do not reflect 

official Institutional opinion. 

Offica: Room 7, Baaemant, 

Academic Center. Teleptione; Ext. 

221, 1717)326-3761. 



STAFF 

Wanna F. Brown 

Managing Editor 

Cynltila E. A Hartranft 

Advertising Director 

Kattly L. Cobb 

Admlnlatratlve Affairs Editor 

Editonal Page Editor 

Sandra L. Musgrave 

Bureau Clilet 

Academic Center 

LeRoy S. VWiltmlre Jr. 

Photograpfiy Editor 



Susan R. Kallansrud 

Bureau Chief 

Building Trades Center 

Catherine A, Hannon 

Bureau Chief 

Learning Resources Center 

Joel J. Mader 

Bureau Chief 

Main Campua/Westalde 

and Sports Reporter 



Jamea E. Treese 

Chief Compositor 

and PMT Technician 



STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Oney M. Wells. Dale Lee Strange, 

Marge OINardo, Roae DINordo, and 

Diana C. VanFleet. 

Anthony N Clllo 

Faculty Adviser 



8P<m.IGHTnMoi<Uj, Feb. 10, HMDJ 



'Early Warning Cards' issued; 
Study Skills Seminars scheduled 



Study Skills Seminars and Library 

Research Seminars have been scheduled 

for those students who received Early 

Warning Cards last week, according to 

Dr Wdliam J. Martin, dean of student 

services. 

The seminars are designed to assist 

students with academic difficulties and, 

according to Dr. Martin, are not Umited 

to only those who receive Early Warning 

Cards. 

"Tke mmIom m open to anyone 

who wuU to iHend; there b no need 

to dpi op," he (taled. 

The Study Skills Seminars, which 

are set up by the Career Advisement 

Center in the Learning Resources Center, 

are to be held in the Academic Center 

Auditorium and in LRC-151 this 

semester. 

Scheduled dates are: Next Tuesday, 

Feb. 18, 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 3:30 

p.m. to 5 p.m.. Auditorium; next 

Wednesday, Feb. 19, 3 p.m. to 4:30 

p m., LRC-151, and 4:30 p.m. to 6 

p.m., LRC-151; next Thursday, Feb. 20, 

2 p.. to 3:30 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. 

to 5 p.m.. Auditorium. 

"The Study Sldlb experience should 

be t good opportunity for stndenti to 

get their studies back on the right 

track," commented Dr. Martin. 



He emphasized that there is no cost 

for attending the seminars and no 

attendance will be taken. 

The Library Research Seminars are 

also open to all students - particularly 

those who receive Early Warning Cards 

- according to Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, 

director of the Learning Resources 

Center. 

Interested itudenti should sign np 

In the Ubrar; In the Learning Resourtei 

Center "at their convenience", she 

added. 

The seminars will teach basic 

information-finding skills and particularly 

the organization of library materials, the 

use of periodicals and indexes, and 

available resources. 

"We will review research skills 

necessary to prepare a term paper... 

[and] students will have hands-on 

opportunities to use the hbrary materials 

and audio-visual equipment..." Mrs. 

Hickey stated. 

The Ubnry Rewarch Semlnin are 

ichednled to meet In the Library next 

Tuesday, Feb. 18, from 4:30 p.m. to 6 

p.m.; next Wednesday, Feb. 19, from 

3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., and next 

Thnnday, Feb. 20, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 

p.m. 



1X1 



en 



New trustees welcomed 

The College administoation held a special reception for new College trustees on Friday, 
Jan 31 The reception was in the student-operated restourant, Le Jeune Chef. 

' According to Ms. Debra K. Barrett, executive secretary to the president, the recepuon was 
to welcome the new trustees. The faculty was invited. , . u a 

The food and hospitality department prepared a light afternoon tea of pastries, cheese and 
fruit, coffee, tea, and punch. w.„i,^ i 

Carol E. Segraves, food and hospitably student from Wuhamsport, and Mattnew l. 
Mitchell, food and hospitality student from Wellsboro, served. 

The new trustees began their terms in January. They are James H. Crossley, George H. 
Groves, Gregory D. Johnson, Robert J. Meacham, Robert T. Manley, and WiUiam J. 
McLean. Harry B. Dietrick was reappointed to the Board. 



4D8P01UGHTDMoidi;, Fdi. II, IMt 

King really IS Bachman: 
the success goes on 



A SPECfAL REPORT 

BY KATHY L.COBB, EDITORIAL PAOE EDITOR 

Several weeks ago, this writer reviewed the novel. Thinner by author Richard 
Bachman (Stephen King). The circumstances which surrounded the publisher's release of 
the hardback edition In comparison to the release of the paperback edition made me 
curious enough to write to the publisher - New American Library, New York City - with 
the following questions: 

Why was the hardback edition released with no mention of Stephen King as author? 
Why, In the hardback edition, did there appear an author's photo, which was ob- 
viously not of Stephen King? 

Why was the paperback edition released with sudden announcements: Stephen King 
writing as Richard Bachmanl? 

Why would Stephen King, with all his success, write under a pseudonym? 
Early this week, we received a reply - In news release form from New American 
Library. Here Is some of the Information... 

Stephen King's early novels - written during 1977 and 1984 - were written under 
the pseudonym of Bachman. The novels were Rage (1977), The Long Walk (1979), . 
Roadwork (1981), The Running Man (1982), and Thinner (1984). 

Thinner was published separately; the other tour novels are available In one edition: 
The Bachman Books: Four Early Novels by Stephen King. This special edition Includes 
an Introduction by King, entitled "Why I Was Bachman". 

Why WM King Bachman? In the special edition's Introduction, and quoted from the 
news release, King admits, "People are asking me why I did It and I don't seem to have 
any very satisfactory answers. 

"Good thing I didn't murder anyone. Isn't It?" 

He also states that during those years he had not been very "savvy about the 
publishing business..." and admits to being "preoccupied... with first trying to get myself 
through school and then to support my family." 

Whatever the reason. King made an excellent choice by coming forward to admit 
that he Is actually Bachman. According to the news release. Thinner soared to the top of 
the New York Times Bestseller List, and sales skyrocketed from "31 ,000 to over 280,000 
(that number Is now almost 300,000) copies". And, of course, the early Bachman books 
now are In great demand. 

And what does the real King have waiting on the sidelines? According to the news 
release. King has recently completed four novels (to be published In the near future), and 
has written and will direct "t^axlmum Overdrive", a film for producer DIno DeLaurentls. 

King - ever full of surprises - never falls to please his fans. Perhaps he has another 
hidden personality waiting to emerge and tantalize the public with tales of the weird, the 
supernatural, the mysterious? 

Iron Eagle has one vision 

Movia review 

o^Trs^oTursU- 7T r 'r^"= ^ss^TXn'sZTse::^ 

'rSL''s,arrlng'L"ouls S'^"'"' '""' '^'^ rT.T^ '^ ' '°T '" '^^ 

Gossett Jr. (Officer and A Although the movie was , !,' ?,"'^' "^* 

Gentleman) and Jason slow a the bealnnhq this ^^"""^ '°"""^ maneuvers In 

GBririrk k a mn«io th=t ^,n Beginning, this Internal ona Air Space, 

bearick, is a movie that can was necessary to develop the ^t"""'- 

be summarized with: plot, ■►.►^P^Gf*.^..^ 



SPOTUCffTDMoadi}, Feb. II, IMtoS 



WHADDYASAY....? 



Question: Do you think professional athletes should be tested 

for drug abuse? 

Location: In front of Susquehanna Room Photo* md interviews 

By LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. 
Of The SPOTLIGHT StatI 




Curtis E. Trutt 

Computer information 

systems student 

VIcksburg: 

"Yes. Drug abuse by athletes 

could pose a danger to 

themselves and other 

players." 




Yvette S. Russle 

Broadcasting student 

Wllllamsport: 

"No. Unless they show signs 

of abusing drugs or If It Is 
really obvious. I feel It would 
be a violation of their rights." 




Lisa M. Beaver 

Practical nursing student 

South Wllllamsport: 

"Yes. Drugs are illegal. They 

shouldn't be using them In 

the first place." ' 




Bridget K. Bartholomew~ 
Dietary technology student 

South Wllllamsport: 
"Yes. They are only hurting 
themselves in the long run." 




Randy G. Lazouras 

Civil engineering 

technology student 

Blossburg: 

"No. It Is against the athletes' 

rights as individuals. 



Patty Schon 

Practical nursing student 

Wllllamsport: 

"Yes. ..because they Influence 

young children and they have 

a tendency to be idolized." 



6aSP(mJGHTaMMib;, Fck. II, IMt 

Iron 

Eagle:or\e 

vision 

».-*■»■ -FROM PAGE 4 



They were confronted by 
jet fighters (MIG-23S) from a 
country accusing our (U.S.) 
pilots of violating their air 
space. 

The U.S. was 
outnumbered and his dad's 
plane was shot down over 
enemy territory. He was put 
on trial Immediately and 
sentenced to be hung 
In three days. 

From this point, the pace 
of the movie takes an upward 
trend. Masters, (or a high 
school senior. Is quite the 
experienced pilot. 
(Remember: his dad is a 
colonel In the Air Force.) 
Masters teams up with 
Chappy Sinclair (Louis 
Gossett Jr.) who is a colonel 
In the Air Force Reserve and 
who flew missions In 
Vietnam. Masters convinces 
Chappy to help him plan a 
rescue mission. 

These guys have a few 
tricks up their sleeves -which 
make this movie worth 
seeing. 



UA V.I.P. 
Movie Tickets 

$2,50 to students 

Sponsored by SGA 
Available in Rec 

Center office 
Room A1 37 LEG 



'Fame': reality at its best 

Television revlaw 

By Oney M. Walli, of Th« SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Television these days has Intimately Involved with the 

gotten to the point of being characters they portray. This 
completely uninspired. can be best seen in the 

You turn on the tube and daydream sequences of 



get nothing but canned 
laughter and violence. 

It's nice to know that 
within this gray world of 
unimaginative and 
unemotional programming 
there are still a few shows 
that capture one's 
imagination and deal with 
serious subjects In an 
entertaining and throught- 
provoklng manner. 

In this writer's opinion, 
the best of such 
programming Is "Fame". 
"Fame" started out as a 
movie, became a series, and 
has been going strong ever 
since. At one point, some of 
the characters did a live 
show which was very 
successful. 

"Fame" Is a program 
about dreams... The kind of 
dreams people strive to make 
reality. 

College students can 
Identify well with this concept 
because, after all, what are 
we here for? 

"Fame" deals with 
serious subject matter In a 
way that Is both entertaining 
and emotionally stimulating. 

One can identify with the 
characters readily since the 
actors and actresses are 



Leroy - in which he confronts 
his problems and 
shortcomings face to face. 

"Fame" has dealth with 
every subject Imaginable 
ranging from love to war. 
Joan Baez appeared on an 
episode on nuclear war. 
Anthony Newley played a 
famous actor who was 
ashamed of his past. 

It must be said that 
"Fame" has something (or 
everyone. If one enjoys 
dancing, the characters are 
some of the best. If one 
wishes to be touched 
emotionally, "Fame" will 
touch places deep In the 
heart. , 

Lastly, "Fame" will make 
you laugh, but not at the 
actors' stupid stunts or 
phrases. "Fame" will allow 
you to laugh at yourself 
through the truly funny 
situations of the human 
condition. 

This Is comedy of the 
best kind. 

In closing, If you haven't 
seen at least one episode of 
"Fame" - and thafs hard to 
believe - you're really 
missing something. Check It 
out. 



Great People Born In February 

President Ronald Reagan 

Abraham Lincoln 

George Washington 

and 

PATRICK D. MURPHY! 



8POmJGHTaMei4iT. Fck. It, IfUDl 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


8-9 


BiWlHIII 


ensiHin 


snanHin 


enanHW 


snanHill 

} 




Sports 


Sporta 


Sparta 


Sports 


Sporta } 


9-10 


Tan Hvdt 


Tail Hard! 


Tan Her* 


TanHardt 


Jim 

Mothers- 
baugh ■ 


10-12 


Nmn 


Nawa 


Newa 




Newa ' 


UtMDsn 


Rod Stacay 


Harry Rogera 


UttleDan 


Jim 

Mothers- 

baugh 


Mr, Smooth 


Steve 

Wenner 


12-2 


Naws/Sports 


Nawa/Sporta 


Newa/Sporta 


Newa/Sporta 


Newa/Sporta 


Mr Smooth 


Yvette 
Ruasle 


Uaa 
McMahon 


Chna Millar 


Lon Yaw 


ShwIWool 


2-3 


Kim Bowman 


Craig Howar 


Kim Bowman 


RondaRadk) 


Scott 
Stengar 


3-4 


Newa/Sporta 


Newa/Sporta 


Newa/Sporta 


Nawa/Sporta 


News/Sports 


Jim Wanner 


Craig Howar 


Jim Wanner 


Ronda Radio 


Scott 
Stenger 


Whaddya' Think 


Poetry 


Whaddya' Think 


Poetry 


Whaddya' Think 


4-S 


Denlaa 
Martin 


Hector Heck 


PeteNleiia 


JeiryNaeca 


Rod Stacay 


5-6 


Oenlaa 
Martin 


Hector Heck 


Pete NIeda 


Jerry Neece 


Rod Stacey 


6-8 


Naws/Sports 


Newa/Sporta 


Newa/Sporta 


Nawa/Sporta 


Nawa/Sporta 


Uva Mike 


Mr X 


Enc Watta 


Tony CoHlna 


Shan Wool 


8-10 


Saan 
Omaaly 


Qlenn 
Mitchell 


UsaQraett 


Captain Jack 


Steve 
Mendez 


10-12 




Joe Haugh 


BIgQuy 


VInca 
CeccaccI 


X 



w 
w 



FM 



SasrOTUGHTDMoidi;, Fct. 1(, int 



Louis S. Eiseman, trustee 
for six years, dies 

Louis S. Eiseman, a member and secretary of the College 
Board of Trustees, died Friday, Jan. 31, 1986, in the 
WiUiamsport Hospital. 

Mr. Eiseman, who served on the Board for six years, was 
very active within the community as well as the College. 

He was a member of the board of directors of the 
WiUiamsport Main Street program, a member of the 
WiUiamsport Kiwanis, and of the Service Corps of Retired 
Executives (SCORE). 

He had been president of the former Worth's Inc. of 
WUUamsport. 

At the CoUege, Mr. Eiseman worked with the Center for 
Business and Industrial Development. 

Grant L. Martin, coordinator of service agency and 
certification programs who worked closely with Mr. Eiseman 
and with Ms. Sandra L. Rosenberger, coordinator of the 
Center for Business and Industrial Development, said there are 
three programs which stand out, in his mind, as tributes to Mr. 
Eiseman: The RetaUers Seminar/Institute, 1984; Partnerships 
'85, and the Loan Packaging Seminar, 1985. Mr. Eiseman 
worked on many other projects as weU. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, CoUege president, stated, "He 
was considered by many of us who work at the CoUege to be 
our mentor... someone whose advice and counsel was not only 
wise but always welcome." 

Mrs. Kathryn W. Lumley, chairperson of the Board of 
Trustees, stated at the Feb. 3 meeting, "Louis Eiseman loved 
the CoUege. He gave very generously of his time and talents." 

At the Feb. 3 meeting, trustee W. Jack Lewis honored Mr. 
Eiseman with a reading of the 23rd Psahn which was foUowed 
by a prayer. 

Mr. Eiseman is survived by his wife, Sarah, two 
daughters, a sister, and five grandchUdren. 



Steering 
Committee 
Identifies 
Major Issues 

"The estabUshment of a 
phUosophy wUl be the second 
of the major nulestones," 
stated James E. Logue, 
chairperson of the CoUege 
Governance Steering Conunit- 
tee and associate professor of 
EngUsh. 

The committee has com- 
pleted its first major task, ac- 
cording to Logue, by identify- 
ing more than 60 issues of 
governance which must now 
be refined in preparation for 
detaUed discussion and resolu- 
tion. 

Logue said that among ^ 
the issues are: 

The structure of gover- 
nance within the CoUege, the 
make-up of governance struc- 
ture, the clarification of the 
role and purpose of gover- 
nance, and the process of 
decision-making. 

"We've gotten a lot 
done... Organizing ourselves, 
identifying critical issues. 
Everything we do now should 
try to fuUUl or achieve what 
our phUosophy wiU be," 
stat«l Logue. 

The CoUege-wide Gover- 
nance System wUl address the 
poUcies and procedures con- 
cerning the College's mission, 
goals, and objectives. The 
Steering Committee is respon- 
sible for reviewing and coor- 
dinating this process. 

Logue emphasized that 
the Committee is comprised of 
members from aU areas of the 
CoUege community and aU 
have "an equal say" concern- 
ing CoUege issues. 



SPOTUGHTDMoiita;, Feb. II, V 



m«d9 



Journalism 
Student 
Finalist 
In Contest 

Susan Ricker Kallansrud, 
a journalism student from 
Williamsport, was notified of 
her finalist status in the Sixth 
Annual CoUege Photography 
Contest sponsored by 
Photographer's Forum 
magazine. 

Of the 17,249 entrits 
from photographers 
throughout the United States 
and Canada, Mrs. Kallansrud 
placed in the top 6 percent of 
the photographic entries. 

Mrs. Kallansrud's work 
will be published with that of 
other finalists in Best of 




STUDENT 
HOUSING 

Furnished Rooms 

Singles, Doubles, 

Apartments available 

ALLUTILITIES 
INCLUDED 

Showers and Idtchen 
facilities 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine Ave. 
and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 
Both within one |1| 

block of WACC 

Phone 326-6536 



CoUege Photography Annual: 
1986. 

As a finalist, she will 
receive a finalist certificate. 

Vk Best of College 
Photography Annual is 
promoted among college 
instructors of art, 
photography and graphic 
design in the United States. 

Winners will be notified 
after Feb. 18, according to 
the contest officials. 



Mrs. Kallansrud is a staff 
reporter with the 
SPOTLIGHT, is serving an 
internship with the Lycoming 
County Cancer Society, and Is 
a member of the College's 
chapter of Phi Beta Lambda, 
serving as that organization's 
social chairperson. 

She and her husband. 
Earl, are the parents of four 
children. 



|-— VALUABLE COUPON"- 

FREE PIZZA 



327-8600 



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Original round pizza at regular 

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lOasrOIUGHTOMiMdi;, Fck. II, IMt 



College 
Bookstore 
To Sell 
Flowers 



The College Bookstore 
will be seUing flowers od 
Valentine's Day, this Friday, 
while supplies last, according 
to Mrs. Heonore R. 
Holcomb, Bookstore super- 
visor. 



Peer Informatioii and Referral Center 
OPEN HOUSE 

Wednesday, February 12 

10 a.m. to 6:45 p.m. 

All Welcome 

Refreshments Served 
Room 105, Gymnuinm 



Peer Information 
and Referral Center 



If you have a pro- 
blem, come and 
talk to us whether 
the problem is big 
or small 

Complete 
Confidentiality 



ROOM 105 
GYMNASIUM 

Hours: 
Mon.-Thurs.: 

1 A.M. • 7 P.M. 

Friday: 

1 A.M. - 2 P.M. 

Closed Weekends 

Students 
helping 
fellow 
students 



Mrs. Holcomb said she 
wanted to remind students 
that the Bookstore is selling 
"many Valentine's Day gifts, 
including stuffed animals, 
mugs, and cards". 



Auditions 
This Week 
For Play 

Open auditions will be 
held tomorrow and Wednes- 
day from 7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Academic Center Auditorium 
for the play. Goodbye 
Charlie, to be presented by 
the Williamsport Players in 
cooperation with the CoU^ 
Activities OfBce. 

According to Mn. JoAnn 
R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities, there are 
parts for three women and 
four men. 

The auditions are open to 
all students, she added. 

The play is to be per- 
formed Wednesday, April 23, 
through Saturday, April 26, 
at 8 p.m. 

Ticket prices will be S2 
for students, faculty and staff 
with College ID and $S for 
the public. 

Reservations may be 
made, tickets may be pur- 
chased, and additional infor- 
mation IS available from the 
Recreation Center Office, 
Room A137, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center, by calling College 
Ext. 763, or by telephoning 
327-4763. 

Seats will be available on 
a space available basis, Mrs. 
Fremiotti commented. 



To Fight 
TheRu: 
Know Your 

Enemy! 

Influenza -commonly 
known as the flu -- is a highly 
contagious disease of the 
respiratory tract. It is 
generated by a virus and is 
distinguished by an onset of 
fever, chills, headache, 
muscular ache, general 
malaise, and respiratory 
symptoms - especially cough 
and sore throat. 

This virus spreads very 
rapidly from person to person 
throu^ droplets in the air or 
by direct contact. 

The time period between 
initial contact with the virus 
and the instant at which 
symptoms first appear is 
ordinarily 24 to 72 hours. 

Because the virus is 
constantly changing, man is 
prevented from building up a 
specific immunity to it. Older 
people and persons with 
chronic illnesses are 
considered high-risk groups. 

Influenza vaccinations 
should be given annually and 
preferably in Autumn. 
Immunization duration is 
comparatively short. It usually 
lasts six months to one year. 

Anyone having an allergy 
to eggs is advised to be 
immunized under the close 
supervision of a doctor 
because the virus is grown in 
chick embryoes. 

The Department of 
Health recommends bed rest, 
adequate fluid intake, Tylenol 
or similar preparation for 
control of fever headache, and 
cough suppressants to control 
excessive coughing. 



SPOTUGHTDMoidi;. Feb. It, lM*all 

Health Week 
Begins Today 

Starting today and continuing through this Thursday, 
Health Week will be observed at the College, according to Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

The event is sponsored by the College Activities Office 
and Student Health Services. 

The special week begins with a cancer screening of the 
bowel, to be done today through the courtesy of the 
WiUiamsport Hospital. The screening will be held in Room 105 
of the Gym from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Today, too, a lecture on AIDS will be given from 10 a.m. 
to 11 a.m. in the Academic Center Auditorium by Gary 
Lattimer, infectious disease health officer for the city of 
WiUiamsport. 

Tomorrow, a seminar on "Drunk Driving: The Law as It 
Pertains to Pennsylvania" will be conducted by Trooper Paul 
W. Baclawski, of the Pennsylvania State PoUce. It will be from 
11 a.m. to noon in the Academic Center Auditorium. 

On Wednesday, a diabetes screening by the College's 
student nurses organization (SNOW) will be conducted from 11 
a.m. to 2 p.m. in Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

On Thursday, from noon to 1 p.m., there will be a 
presentation on "Drunk Driving: The Effects" by Sheldon 
Brotman, traumatologist at the Geisinger Medical Center. 

All programs are free and open to students, faculty, staff, 
and the community -except the cancer screening which is not 
available to the community at large. 




i 



Welcome College Students 

love us for lunch, we 'd love you for dinner. ' 

Serving dinner Monday thru Friday 

5 to 9 pm 

Nightly specials 

20 per cent off dinner with 

student I.D. card 

Offer good through March 1, 1986 

Court & Willow Cafe 

326 Court Street 

322-0135 



..jl^____^ ^..^..i..^..^...i..a;..i..i..i"i"a."S.-|^i 



s 



lloSPOTUGHTaMmdaT, FA. M, IMf 

^^ DANCE %^ ^^ 
DANCE % 
Valentines DANCE ^^ 

In The Susquehanna Room 

February 12,1986 

8:30 p.m. to11:30 p.m. 

MUSIC BY 

% 
the fox! ^ 

fm99.3Qm1450 



v^ 



^m^^u^Si 



/ 



^ ADMISSION $1.50 ^ 

^^ _ SPONSORED BY ^^ 

Sp GAMMA EPSILON TAU mM 



Free Concert 
To Be Given 
By Choir 

The Wagner Alumni 
Gospel Choir will present a 
free concert at 7 p.m. this 
Saturday, Feb. IS, in the 
Rooke Chapel at Bucknell 
University, according to 
iitformation posted by the 
College Activities C^ce. 

The choir has performed 
in such states as Florida, 
Kentucky, and Georgia. 

They have performed 
with such Gospel singers- 
groups as The Clark Sisters, 
the Voices of Fellowship, and 
the Philadelphia Mass Choir. ' 

The group has also 
recorded two albums. 



Colon cancer 
test kits 
available 
from nurse 

Colon cancer infonnation 
and test kits will be 
distributed by Mrs. Janet R. 
Querimit, R.N., the College 
nurse, today from 8 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. in Room 105 of the 
Bardo Gym. 

The kits must be returned 
by this Thursday, she said. 

The test is provided free 
through the Occupational 
Health Programs of the 
Williamsport Hospital, she 
Hid. 



SPOTUGHTDMoadi;, Feb. 1(, lM(al3 

Music, music, music... 
highlights Artist Series 

The local Artist Series for Spring 1986 will be held 

during March and April, according to Mrs. JoAnn 

R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

Voyage Plus/Guest artists and a jazz concert will be in 

the Academic Center Auditorium at 3 p.m. on March 2. 

At 7:30 p.m. on March 22, the Lewisburg Area Men 

Barberehop Singers (LAMB) concert will be performed. 

During April, activities include a concert by Uie Legani- 

Hanne Chapter, Sweet Adelines, at 7:30 p.m., April S in 

the Academic Center Auditorium. 

On April 27, the WiUiamspori Symphony Orchestra 

Chamber Players will perform in the Academic Center 

Auditorium at 3 p.m. 

The Series tickets are $10; individual concert tickets are 

$4. There will be no free tickets to students, faculty, or staff 

of the College. 

Reservations and tickets may be obtained in the 

Recreation Center Office, Room AI37, Lifelong Education 

Center, or by telephoning 327-4763. 

All seats will be reserved. Advance reservations are 

recommended, Mrs. Fremiotti said. 



BARRY'S 




OSpm 7 a.m. to midnlghl 

Monday thru Friday 

Open Saturday I p.m. to 3 a.m. 

Barry says: Wc won't cook i bargcr before its tiac. 



Brooklyn Style Eatery 



•A Unique Eating Experience 
•Best Breakfast in Town 
•Arcade and Pool Table 
•Daily Specials 

234 Park Si. Just across from 
(he aew east parking lot 




PHONE 
323-FOOD 




14aSPOTUGHTDMogil<;, Feb. It, »U 

"THE BEST 
THING WE HAVE 
HERE ARE 
OUR STUDENTS 
AND 
EMPLOYEES..." 



SPOTLIGHUng... 
Mrs. Linda M. Morris 



B; Ktthj L. Cobb 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



Mrs. Linda M. Morris, director of personoel services and Equal Opportunity Employer 
coordinator, is a native of Rochester, N.Y. 

Mrs. Morris has been employed by the College since 1977. 

Mrs. Morris received a bachelor's degree in history from Good Counsel College, White 
Plains, N.Y., and a master's degree in history from Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. 

Prior to being hired by the College, Mrs. Morris held several other positions, including 
assistant registrar at Marymount Manhattan College, New York; admissions and acting 
registrar at Chamberlin Junior College, Boston, and writer of training programs at 
MetropoUtan Life Insurance Company, New York. 

As director of personnel services at the College, Mrs. Morris is responsible for monitoring 
and coordinating College personnel, authorizing the payroll, reviewing advertising for 
positions, reviewing job descriptions, classing jobs, setting pay rates, processing applications. 

As the Equal Opportunity Employer coordinator for the College, she is responsible for 
monitoring the College's balance of employees - specifically being mindful of desegregation in 
which the College as other employers must adhere to in order to meet established goals - and 
fairness to all employees. 

Mrs. Morris added that her ofBce is also responsible for handling the communication of 
benefits and personnel pohcies, employee evaluations and maintenance of salary systems, 
conducting market surveys, salary incrementation, and maintenance of basic employee profiles. 

About the College, Mrs. Morris stated, "The best thing we have here are our students and 
employees - particularly classified and service staff, who often are overlooked. They show 
pride in their positions with the College... they are hard workers who deserve recognition." 

In her spare time, Mrs. Morris enjoys spending time with her children, John, 7, and twins, 
Gail and Kelly, 4. She would also like to take the College's cross-country skiing course. 

Mrs. Morris' husband, Richard, is employed as an associate professor of history at 
Lycoming College. The family resides in WilUamsport. 



SPOTUGBTOMoidi;, Feb. 1*. IMtD 



15 



Come to the first annual 

SWINGIN' SWEETHEART 

DANCE 



Valentine Dance >^^^ Feb. 13 

THURSDAY ^fl* 9 to midnight 

in the Susquehanna Room 
MUSIC VTOEOS 

and the best in rock and top 40's 

exclusively brought to you by PBL's own 

Glenn Shaffer and Ted Haines 

Admission: $1.00 per person 

$1.50 per couple 

Sponsored by Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) 



<} 



9? 



^ 



To be raffled: 28 oz. heartshaped 
box of candy for yoor sweetheart. 



16D8P(mJGHTOM<»diT. '*■ '». •♦»* 



These Valentine's Day messages are presented 
as given by the senders... Those who are sending 
messages made donations totalling $20.37 for the 
Lycoming County Blind Association. 



Valentine 





To Mr. X, we will be logelher 
soon. X.T.C. 



Kami, tliid I toi 'lie f*""" «> 
know you. Happy Vulenline's Day! 
Love, Mike. 



Messages 



Sweetie, let's rendezvous! Happy 
yalentine's Day! Love ya'! 
Shnookums, 



Legs: Happy Valentine's Day, and 
ecstacy. Love, Mouse. 



Earl, glad I "/lew" away with you. 
It's been a trip! All my love 
always, Punky. 



Doug, I love you more today than 
yesterday. Marsha. 



Danetn, I will always love you and 
will never leave you. Love, Dave. 



To my sweetheart: Kirk, Happy 
Valentine's Day! I love you! 
Georgia 



Here's to the five years we've 
spent together hoping there are 
many to follow. I love you, KAP. 



Roses are red, violets are blue, 
Missie Molar, this is how much I 
love you. 

Tam, 143, 1 am so glad that I 
found you. Happy Valentine's Day! 
Yo Amore Tu. Lonnie. 



To the atomic shrewed woman, 
Happy Valentine's Day. Robi 



Happy Valentine's Day Linda, 
Slell, Judy P. Millie, Bobbi, Park, 
Dale, Fred, Harold 



TV, Happy Valentine's Day from 
someone who still cares. JY. 



Darling Punldn-Buns: sweet lovely 
Snooky-Wookums, you occupy my 
every waking thought. My total ex- 
istence depends upon your scin- 
tillating presence. 1 crave for you, 
yearn for you, lust for you, I howl 
at the moon for you. Be my valen- 
tine. P.S. What's for supper? 



To my Huggy Bear: you drive me 
crazy 'cause you're so fine. 1 love 
you; will you be my Valentine? 
Sweetcake. 



Bryan Frymore (machinist): Happy 
Valentine's Day from the girl whose 
eyes always caught yours across the 
cafeteria. 



Scott, I love you with all my heart, 
be my Valentine. Love, Kelly. 



Clyde, you are the only one I ever 
want to snuggle with In candlelight. 
Love, Dee. 



Mary Facey, Dental Clinic, love 
and kisses from Secret Admirer. 



To Kevin, Happy Valentine's Day. 
Karen. 



To my sailor: you are the one that 
brings love to my life, a smile to 
my lips; you are the one that brings 
joy to my heart, laughter to my 
ears; you are the one that this day 
was made for, you are the one that 
I love. Your wife, Joan. 



sronjCBrraMaatv, fa. ii, im*d17 




Zounds, woman.' Head for the 
shower! R.A.E. 



Mary Facty, Dental Clinic: Love 
and kisses from Secret Admirer. 

Rich: the sim may come, the sun 
may go, but my love for you will 
continue to grow. Margaret. 



Joe B.: Thanki for sharing 
something special with me. It was 
all worth it. Love ya'. Cindy S. 



Hulk Diamond: let's share Asti and 
bubbles sometime soonti Love ya', 
MAS (Soon to be a sister.) 



rulf: Remember I luv you. Happy 
Valentine's Day always. Wen. 



Robin, I love you with all my 
heart. Love always, Lyie. 



Artwork by Arthur L. Straub, of The SPOTLIGHT Stttff 



Rod, I still do care. Be my 
Happpy Valentine's Day, Babel I Valentine.Love ya'. Sharon 
hope we spend the rest qj them 
together tool Your future fiance. Jack: Friends? T.H. 

Rob. 



To SPOTUOHT sweethearts: have 
a nice Valentine's Day, William. 

Dear Mi. S: Race you lo'the 
showersi Happy Valentine's Dayl 
Jackie. 



Happy Valentine's Day, Denny. 
Good luck in the PA. Love ya. 
Babe. Joy. 



Denny: thank you for being a' 
fnend. T.H. 



Kelly: looking forward to a bigger 
and better future together. Happy 
Valentine's Dayl Rod. 
Pearl: all my love, always. LyIe. 



Kim: I love you and am very pioud 
of you so far. Keep up the good 
work. Love ya'. Kevin. 



To Miss Maria Sturniolo: Happy V 

Day. Maybe, just maybe you will La"™: " '<>«> "' "<^ """ ""I"* 

be able to tet some sleep. It's "' W"'. """"Wng I must say is 1 

Questionable! I do love you!!! Love »" '""'' "f I""' '«" ■ 

l^P- *■>■>■ PACE IS >■>■>■ 



18a8POTUGHTaM(M4i;, Fek. 11, IfM 

»--»---niOMPAGEI7 



*(Mer o« «rf, v/o/rl; art blue. 
Ciiuly, lake care of yourself 'cause 
I care aboul you. Scon. 



To my sttetthean: you have made 
Ihe pasi year and a lialf the mosi 
special lime in my life. I lave you 
more as each day passes and I'll 
continue to love you until Ihe end 
qftime I love you! Your Utile girl. 



P.B.L members and other 

students, don'l forget Ihe dance 

Thursdayl 

P.S. Have a Happy Valentine's 

Day. everyonel P.B.L. Officers 



I love ya' KeithI Forever, Toni. 



Toni./or Ihe prettiest, sweetest, 
and most caring girl I've ever 
known. You give my life true 
meaning and happiness beyond 
comparison. Let's stay together 
forever/ 1 love you so very much! 
Yours forever, Keith. P.S. Be my 
Valentine. 



Happy Valentine's Day to Marty's 
girl. 



Happy Valentine's Day, Lisa. 
You'll always be Chuck's best girl 



Happy Valentine's Day, Jim. mil 
you be mine? Love Q 



Mark, I love you and you art my 
everything, Tina. 



Rosts art red, violets are blue; 
today is special because / love you. 
Happy Valentine's Day. 



always in my dreams. 



To Ihe magnificent seven: We love 
you. All 0/ humanity. 



Tina, I love you. Ron Steele 
Spate Worm, I love you. Honey. 



Kelly, I love you with all my heart, 
Scott. 



Hayes, guess who likes you? 



Lorraine, Denise, and Nicole, 
Happy Valentine's Day! Mom and 
Bob. 



Dee, I'm a prisoner of your love 
today and always. I love you. 
Clyde. 

Rosts art red, violets are Nut, Phi 
Beta Lambda we will slaughter you 
in volleyball!!! 

Gamma Epsilon Tau 



Gamma Epsilon Tau will sponsor a 
Valentine's dance on Wednesday 
February 12m. Prizes will be given 
away. 



Kimmy B., thanks for being my 
best buddy. Lave y a', Cindy S. 



Kelly: to somtont I'd like to get to 
know much better, ' because you'rt 
worth it. Happy Valentine's Day. 
Vince 



Mr. Golttfeder: We love ya' I Phi 
Beta Lambda. 



WWAS schedule 
completed 

Student persoimel of 
WWAS, the College's student- 
operated radio station, have 
posted their schedule for the 
semester, according to Theresa 
M. Ronen, broadcasting 
student and promotions 
director. 

The schedule is being 
pubUshed as a campus service 
by The SPOTLIGHT on page 
seven of this edition. 

Highlights of the radio 
station's schedule include: 
W.A.C.C. Wake Up, 
ftoffl 8 to 9 a.m., daily; Top 
40 Hits, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., 
daily; Alternative, from 4 to 6 
p.m., daily; Main Stream, 
Heavy Metal, and Album- 
Oriented Rock, 6 p.m. to 
midnight daily. 

UA tickets 



available 



United Artists V.I.P. 
movie tickets are still available 
to students in the Recreation 
Center Office, Room A137, 
Lifelong Education Center, 
according to Greg Lange, 
accounting student from Lock 
Haven and president of the 
Student Government 
Association. 

Tickets are sold for $2.50 
each. They are good for a 
year at all eastern United 
Artists movie theaters, said 
Lange. 

"We hope to keep a 
continuous supply on hand 
for the students, but, this 
depends on the response of 
the student body," said Ms. 
Daria Beahm, accounting 
student from Beech Creak and 
SGA treasurer. 

The movie ticket sale is 
sponsored by SGA. 



Library 
Staff 
Offers 
Help 

Library Research Skills 
Seminars will be offered next 
week, according to Mrs. Kate 
D. Hickey, director of the 
Learning Resources Center. 

The seminars - sesions 
to give information - will be 
held on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 
from 4:30 to 6 p.m.; on 
Wednesday, Feb. 19, from 
3:30 to 3 p.m., and 
Thursday, Feb. 20, from 7 to 
8:30 p.m. 

Mrs. Hickey said that the 
seminars are free. They will 
be held in Room 20SA, 
Learning Resources Center. 

All students interested in 
improving their skills may 
sign up at the information 
desk in the Library. 

The seminars will provide 
instruction for basic 
information-finding skills, 
including the organization of 
library materials, the use of 
periodicals, indexes, and 
resources available both in the 
College's library and other 
libraries. 

The seminars will review 
research skills necessary to 
prepare a term paper. 

The seminars will, Mrs. 
Hickey said, provide 
opportunity to use library 
materials and audio-visual 
equipment in the preparation 
of short research assignments. 
When possible, she said, class 
contents and assignments will 
be modified to meet specific 
needs of students. 



SPOIUGHTaMoidty, Fck. II, 1M<d19 




DR. MARTEL: Mnch Experience 

Scientist-author to open 
College's Spring 
Special Events Series 

Dr. Leon C. Martel, political scientist and author of 
Mastering Change: The Key to Business Success, will start 
off the Special Events schedule for this Spring, according to 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

Dr. Martel will speak on The Future of Technology in 
the Academic Center Auditorium next Wednesday, Feb. 19. 
He will be available throughout the day, with the afternoon 
hours being conducted in seminar style and the evening 
hours being highlighted by an in-depth discussion on the 
future of technology, Mrs. Fremiotti said. There is no fee, 
she added. 

Dr. Martel specializes in the forecasting of economic, 
political, social, and resource issues, she said. 

He is a captain in the United Sutes Naval Reserve with 
extensive professional experience in the fields of political and 
miUtary inteUigence, according to Mrs. Fremiotti. 



ZODSPOTUGBTDMowta;, Feb. II, IfU 



W.A. c a 

Horizons 



Early in the morning, 

the water hits the shore. 
Every wave that hits it, 

takes a little more. 

The sun comes up 

in colors red and 

orange. 

Illuminating the sky, 

in the very early mom. 

A couple strolls by 

hand in hand 
Neither says a word 

just walking through 
the sand. 

In the distance lies a sea shell 

all by itself 
Waiting for someone to find it 

and put it on a shelf. 

Many times, like sea shells, 

we find ourselves alone 

Waiting for another 

to take us to their 

home. 

A feeling felt by all of us, 

the feeling to belong 

Stems inside all of us, 

this feeling to belong. 



SEA 
SHELLS 



C. Aunkst 
Human Services 
Jersey Shore 



SPOTUGBTDMogdi;, Feb. 10, 1«Wd21 

CAN THIS BE LIFE 

To know LOVE yet feel and understand pain 

To travel to the edge of your minds resources 

and still remain sane 

Experiencing moods that are hard to comprehend 

To live your life in Peace and fullfillment 
until you've reached the end 

Life is a tool in the hands of 

both wise men and fools 

Playing a game so hard to understand 

with all kinds of stupid rules 

The worst rule being; 

no matter how hard you try 

you never really win 

Because for every trouble you overcome 

there's another one to begin 

Yet we live on 
enjoying each night and day 
While knowing in our hearts 
it's the only way 

Can This Be Life 

I ask you my ft-iend LYLE A. WAGNER 

YES we all say GRAPHIC ARTS STUDENT 

over and over again FROM MILLVILLE 



LOVE 



FLYING SO HIGH ON FEELINGS FROM ABOVE 

YET SO AFRAID OF GETTING HURT 

TAKING THE CHANCE BECAUSE YOU CARE SO 

MUCH 

YET HOLDING BACK JUST IN CASE 

BELIEVING IN HIM 

THINKING HE CAN DO YOU NO WRONG 

YET STILL HOLDING ON TO DOUBTS 

IS THAT WHAT LOVE IS ALL ABOUT? 

Debi Camp 

Computer Science major 

Montoursville 



22D8P01UGBTDM<w4t;, Fck. II, IMt 




The Old Bridge 

By Kathy L. Cobb 

She stood against the battered 
railing, not caring if it were safe; for 
she, through her many years had 
come to love the old bridge with its 
serene view of the landscape. Her 
heavy wrinkled eyes closed as she 
remembered the delicate years of her 
childhood. Over eighty years ago, she 
had come here as a very young girl, 
unmarred by life, to admire the cool, 
trickling stream of water. 

Long ago, this bridge had been 
brightly painted by her father. But 
now, her fingers caressed the worn 
handrail and a tear fell to her cheek. 
Soon her beloved and sacred bridge 
would be torn down, and the crystal 
clear stream would be blocked and 
filled to make room for modern 
development. 

She had spent a lifetime treastir- 
ing this tranquil, beautiful haven, 
and her heart could not bear the pain 
of seeing it destroyed. She knew there 
would never again exist such a 
peaceful place, for man had progress- 
ed so much since the early days. 

A quiet moment passed---so 
quiet that even the stream seemed to 



Artwork by James E. Treese 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Stqff 



stop and listen. It was quite strange 
to the old woman, so she opened her 
eyes and surveyed the surroundings. 
A change had taken place, unlike any 
change she had ever seen before. 

Nature seemed to reach out to 
her. The sky darkened and a high 
wind blew, violently whipping her 
dress about her legs. Sorrow shot 
through her heart as she raised her 
eyes to the sky. Now the long tendrils 
of the willow tree beckoned to her, 
and, as she saw this, she began a short 
walk to the tree, entranced by the 
sudden changes in Mother Nature. As 
she walked, the tattered old bridge 
creaked and groaned. The boards 
splintered under her weight, and the 
bridge began to sway. 

She turned and sat against the 
trunk of the aged willow tree, resting 
her terribly weary bones. Even as she 
closed her eyes once more, the wind 
took on a hollow, eerie sound echo- 
ing through the trees, calling her 
name in all comers of the universe. 

Finally, the sky cleared, and the 
wind stopped blowing. The old 
woman had fallen into a darkness so 
vast that it could not be penetrated. 
She would go on to another paradise, 
one similar to her quiet, peaceful 
haven. A paradise that could never 
be destroyed— not even by man. 



SrOTUGBTaMiw^T. Fck. 1(, \mo23 



GOOD BYE 



I love you so much 

that I'm gonna set you free, 
The pain in my eyes 

will ya come back to me 

I've never loved like this before 
Please don't let me walk out that door 

I've tried so hard to make you happy 
and failed in so many ways 

I look back on the mistakes of tear 
filled nights and days 

I want you forever to just be mine 

But that's a commitment of a long time 

Commitment scares me 
Commitment scares you 
life without us 
would be so blue 

My life without you seems 

hopeless and sad 
I only wish you happiness, and 

to be forever glad 

Remember one promise is 

ALL I ask 
NEVER take the life of another 

It's a very messy task . 

I'll be out of your life when I kiss you 

one last time 
Leaving SKOAL, a card and this 

poem behind 



DEBI CAMP 

COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR 

FROM MONTOGRSVILLE 



24o8P01UGHTDMoi4i;, Fck. II, IM( 



The Awakening ^y Aharon a. wooi 



It was very chilly for a mid- 
August early evening. The sky was 
very clear and the sunset had a 
pink glow to it. There was a cool, 
moist breeze blowing, bringing 
with it a musty smell from the 
trees. 

Wendy sat on the cold asphalt 
of her driveway, not worrying 
about the dampness that could 
stain her new blue shorts. No, she 
had too much on her mind right 
now to worry about a pair of 
shorts. 

Visions flashed before her 
eyes. Visions of a swingset, a new 
pink bike finally in her possession, 
the same bike she had beentold so 
many times before that she 
couldn't have. A vision of long, 
blond curls lying on a beautician's 
floor and tears mixing with the 
hair. One final vision flashed 
before her eyes. The vision of the 
Christmas before, when the fami- 
ly had gathered and the relatives 
who hadn't spoken in years were 
a whole unit again, as if time had 
never lost this family. 

As the wind whistled through 
the trees smd Wendy listened to 
the peaceful lull, she realized that 
one person was in every thought, 
one person was always there 
prominently~her father. 

Her father, he had always 
been there, no matter what. What 



would become of that now? Tomor- 
row he may be gone, and there 
would be no time for tears or 
good-byes. 

Lazy afternoon conversations 
with silly dialogue still lingered in 
her mind. 

"Daddy." 

"What?" 

"Do you love me?" 

"Yep." 

"How much?" 

"Oh, I'm not really sure. 
About this much." he would tease, 
while extending his thumb and 
forefinger about an inch. 

The thoughts of him lying in 
that hospital bed crying lingered in 
the night air. Her father NEVER 
cried. Something was seriously 
wrong, she could feel it. Why 
wouldn't they tell her what it was? 
She wasn't a little girl anymore, 
she was seventeen now and seem- 
ed to be the one who loved him the 
most. 

Now she knew why he'd been 
so eager to have her leave for the 
summer. He knew his health was 
failing. He was afrmd and he didn't 
want her to know it, so he decided 
to send her away so she wouldn't 
find out. Just so it wouldn't hurt 
her as much, or so he thought. 

Suddenly she heard footsteps 
behind her. 



AWA 



im 



ING 



'FROM PACE 24 



SPOTUGHTDMoida;, Feb. II, 1*Md25 



"Wendy." It was her brother, 
Scott. 

"Yeah?" 

"I was just wondering how 
you're feeling. I'm feeling pretty 
lousy." 

"Why do they try to hide 
things from me?" 

"They don't want you to 
worry." 

"But, I worry more because I 
don't know what's going on. I've 
never told you or Michelle this, but 
I love you guys and I'm scared. 
Please help. It hiu-ts to grow up, I 
know, and this has made me grow 
up a lot faster than I think I'm 
ready to." 

His silence spoke for him. He 
was scared too, not only for 
himself, but for her as well. 

The morning sun shining 
through her window awoke Wen- 
dy the following morning, not to 
mention the birds just outside the 
window. She yawned and stretch- 
ed as she did every other morning, 
but this wasn't aay other morning, 
today she would have the oppor- 
timity to see her father. Today she 
would demand that they give her 
some answers. 

"Daddy," she whispered soft- 
ly. The sight of her father sudden- 



ly frightened her. 

"Hi, hon," she could tell that 
he was going to try and put up a 
front. 

"Can we talk?" 

"Of course. We can talk any 
time, about anything you'd like." 

"No. Not if you're going to 
hide things from me and lie to 
me." 

Her father said nothing. A 
single tear dripped slowly down 
his face and onto the white blanket 
covering him. 

As they sat in silence, Wendy 
finally filled the hollow space with 
a meager, "I love you." Suddenly 
it seemed as if no matter what they 
told her, she could deal with it and 
understand. 

When the morning sun did 
finally shine bright in her room, 
and the birds did finally sing, she 
woke up with a light sweat cover- 
ing her body. She realized that 
there was something that she 
must do. It was all a dream and she 
had learnt from it. 

She raced down the stairs as 
fast as she could and just as quick- 
ly into her parents' room. 
"Dad, Dad get up!" 
"What's wrong?" She had 
startled him. 

"Nothing, I just love you." 



26a8P(nuGBTaMiMter, m. u, int 



STUDENTS DO 
•DO' WINDOWS 

The students of the 
fashion merchandismo 
and display class have 
decorated ["dressed") the 
display windows-on the 
first floor of the 
Academic Center. 

the displays follow a 
valentine's day theme as 
fart of lab requirements 
for the class, according 
TO MRS. Donna G. 
Pfeufer, instructor of 

BUSINESS administration 

and fashion 
merchandising. 

This display is one of 

THREE displays SCHEDULED 
IN THE NEXT THREE MONTHS, 

ADDED Mrs. Pfeufer. 

"The students are 
responsible for all the 
planning, design, 
organization, and 
construction of the 
displays," said Mrs. 
Pfeufer. 

Local retailers such 

as WILSON'S AND 
BOTTORFF'S CONTRIBUTED 

merchandise to be 
displayed. personal ttems 
were brought in by 
students. 

the students worked 
in groups of four, wtth 
one group working on 
the display window at 
deliverance lifetime 
Sports in South 

WiLLIAMSPORT, 

The STUDENTS who are 

WORKING AT DELIVERANCE 
ARE GIVEN THE EXPERIENCE 
OF WORKING DIRECTLY WTTH 
A RETAILER, SAID MRS. 
PFEUFER. 



DRESSIN' 

'Em UP! 




DRESSING I minoMiiiin in one of the exhibit windows on 
the tint door of the Actdemic Center are MichcDe L. 
Hnrtey and SUrene E. Kintetter, itndenti in the fiihion 
merchuditing diss. /SPOTUGHT pholo by URoy S 
Whitmire Jr. I 



SPOTUGHTDMoidi;, Feb. 10, l)Ua27 

TEACHING AWARDS PROCEDURES 

REVISED; NOMINATION FORMS 
AVAILABLE AT VARIOUS PLACES 



The College's 
Distinguished Teaching 
Awards have been revised this 
year and students are being 
encouraged to participate by 
nominating instructors, 
according to Dr.Robert G. 
Bowers, executive assistant for 
internal affairs. 

According to Dr. Bowers, 
the nomination form itself has 
been revised to make the 
nominating process more 
accessible and a more guided 
writing experience. 

Dr. Bowers emphasized 
that the nomination process is 
open to everyone: students, 
faculty, alumni, and staff. 
i HOPE THEY TAKE 
THE TIME TO...' 

"Anyone having direct 
knowledge of a person's 
abilities may nominate... 
here's an opportunity for 
people to acknowledge an 
individual who's made a 
difference in their life. I hope 
they take the time and effort 
to show their appreciation to 
that individual," he stated. 

Dr. Bowers said, 
"Instruction is the centerpiece 
of what we do at the College., 
these awards are designed to 
show the excellence of that 
instruction." 

This is the fifth year for 
the awards which are designed 
to give public recognition to 
those faculty members who 
exhibit outstanding 
performance. 

THOSE WHO RECEIVED 
AWARDS IN THE PAST 

In the past, the following 



faculty members have received 
recognition: 

1984- Master Teacher 
Award, Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, 
professor, government, 
history, sociology, and 
philosophy. Excellence in 
Teaching Awards, Donald M. 
Flynn, associate professor, 
diesel mechanics, and Ms. 
Ann R. Miglio, assistant pro- 
fessor, food service and 
hospitality. 

1983 - Master Teacher 
Award, Dr. Peter B. 
Dumanis, professor, EngUsh. 
Excellence in Teaching 
Awards, Ms. Patricia J. 
Shoff, associate professor, 
business administration, and 
Robert W. Stull, assistant 
professor, electrical occupa- 
tions. 

1982 - Master Teacher 
Award, Mrs. Veronica M. 
Mudc, professor, English. Ex- 
cellence in Teaching Awards, 
Victor A. Michael Sr., 
associate professor, elec- 
tronics; James B. Shaw, assis- 
tant professor, physics; Ms. 
Margaret A. Thompson, 
associate professor, computer 
science, and Thomas M. 
Winder, assistant professor, 
computer science. 

Dr. Bowers stressed that 
those who wish to nominate a 
faculty member should be 
aware of the eligibility re- 
quirements. 

To be eligible, the in- 
structor must have completed 
one full year of full-time in- 
struction at the College. To 



be eUgible for the Master 
Teacher Award, the instivctor 
must have completed three or 
more fiill years of full-time in- 
struction. 

He also stressed that if 
an instructor has received the 
Master Teacher Award in the 
past, five years must pass 
before he or she may receive 
that award again. 

However, he or she may 
be eUgible for the Excellence 
in Teaching Award at 
anytime. Those who received 
Excellence in Teaching 
Awards may be nominated 
again, he said. 
WHERE FORMS 
AVAILABLE 

Official nomination forms 
and information booklets are 
available now in the Tutoring 
Center, LRC; the College 
Information Office, second 
floor, LEC; Executive Office 
200, second floor, LEC; the 
Financial Aid Office, second 
floor, Academic Center; the 
SGA Office, LEC; at the 
North Campus, and at Uie 
Earth Sciences Campus. 

DEADLINElS MARCH 10 

Interested persons should 
be aware. Dr. Bowers not^^, 
that if they have writing 
difficulties, assistance is 
available at tiie Tutoring 
Center, LRC. 

The nomination deadline 
is March 10. All nominations 
are to be submitted to Dr. 
Bowers' office. Executive 
Office 200, second floor, 
LEC. 



ISoSPOTUGBTaMoadi;, Feb. 10, 1>M 



Martin Luther King's 

Daughter To Be Key Speaker 

For Women's Week in April 

Yolanda King, daughter of the late civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., 
will be the key speaker during the College's 1986 Women's Week, according to Mn. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College Activities. 
Women's Week this year will be observed from Monday, April 7, through Saturday, 

April 12, inclusive. The theme is "Stepping into Tomorrow". 
Ms. King's speech, "The Challenge to Insure the Future" , will be on the opening 
day (April 7), three days after the memorial of her father's death which occurred on April 
4, 1968. 
Her lecture ~ open to all with no admission fee - will be at 7:30 p.m. that day in the 
Academic Center Auditorium. 
Ms. King was bom in Montgomery, Alabama, in 195S. 
Following in the steps of her father, she has become a leading spokesperson in the 
human rights movement. 
She received her bachelor of arts degree in theater and African-American studies from 
Smith College and a master of fine arts degree from New York University. 

OTHER EVENTS LISTED 

Other events for Women's Week include... 
On Tuesday, April 8, Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, professor of EngUsh, will review the 
book. The Color Purple, at S p.m. in Room A-12SB, Lifelong Education Center. Dinner 
will be by reservation. 
At 7:30 p.m. that day. Gospel singers Becky Ward-Mitchell, Hank Mitchell, Michele 
Hock-Ward, and James Ward will perform in the Academic Center Auditorium 
On Wednesday, April 9, a movie entitled. Black History: Lost/Strayed/or Stolen will 
be shown in the Academic Center Auditorium with a discussion following about civil rights 
locally today. 
The week will conclude with a performance of The Best of Black Broadway, a 
national touring ensemble, at 8 p.m., Saturday, April 12, in the Academic Center 
Auditorium 
• All activities will be open to the public at no fee except the performance of The Best 

of Broadway. For that, there is an admission fee of $3 for College students, faculty, and 
staff with College ID and S5 general admission. Reservations and tickets are available in 
the Recreation Center, Room A137, Lifelong Education Center, or by telephoning 
327-4763. 
Women's Week is sponsored by the College Activities Office, by Women's Forum, 
and by the Multi-Cultural Society of the College. Funding in part is by the Pennsylvania 
Humanities Council. 



MAYOR SIGNS 
PROCLAMATION 

A proclamatioD declaring this week 
National Phi Beta Lambda week was 
signed last Monday by Mayor Stephen J. 
Lucasi at Williamsport Qty Hall, 
according to Paul W. Goldfeder, 
assistant professor of business 
administration and the club's adviser. 

Goldfeder, along with Ceylon S. 
(Lonnie) Reinard, president of the 
CoUege chapter, and Richard L. Evans, 
vice president attended the ceremony. 

Nationwide, over 200,000 college 
students will be observing PBL week with 
events plaimed on various campuses. 

PEL is noted for their special 
activities designed to increase 
understanding and support in outside 
sectors. 

In conjunction with tiie celebration, 
the organization is sponsoring a dance 
Thursday evening from 9 to 12 in tiie 
Susquehanna Room at a cost of $1.50. 
Music will be provided by Glenn Shaffer 
and Ted Hanes. 

A bake sale will be held Friday in 
Uie Academic Center lobby from 8 a.m. 
to 1 p.m., witii Tanya J. Boone serving 
as chairperson. 

The organization is giving away a 
Valentine heart filled witii Candy 
Cupboard chocolates with a ret^ value 
of S2S. The drawing will be held at the 
dance. Anyone interested in signing up 
may do so in the PBL ofBce, Room 3 of 
the Academic Center, ftee of charge. 



The Horticulture 
Club will hold a Valen- 
tine's Day Flower Sale 
this Friday beginning at 
9 a.m. in the Academic 
Center foyer and in the 
Susquehanna Room. 
The flowers will be 
sold in bud vases and 
in bunches. 
The sale will end 
when all the flowers 
have been sold. 



Hort Club 
to sell flowers 



gPOTUGHTOMoidiy, M. II, »Md29 

Need some 

help? 

Get it at 

Advisement 

Center: 

Focus on resume writing 
and interviewing skills 

The Advisement and Career Services 

Center staff is offering a number of 

specialty sessions to College students who 

will soon be entering the job market. 

Counselors who will conduct these 

seminars are Kathryn A. Ferrence, Weldon 

W. Michael, Thomas M. McNally, and 

Thomas C. Shoff, under the aegis of 

Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of 

advisement and career services. 

Interested students should contact the 

Advisement Center, Room 157, Learning 

Resources Center. 

Sessions are scheduled botii on Main 

Campus and at Uie Natural Resources 

Management Center. 

On Main Campus, sessions are 

scheduled in Room 205A, LRC, as follows; 

RESUME WRITING 

Tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 11, 10 a.m. 

This Wednesday, Feb. 12, 3 p.m. 

This Thursday, Feb. 13, 1 p.m. 

Next Thursday, Feb. 18, 12:30 p.m. 

Next Wednesday, Feb. 19, 10 a.m. 

INTERVIEWING SKILLS 

Next Thursday, Feb. 20, 3 p.m. 

Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2 p.m. 

Wednesday, Feb. 26, 3 p.m. 

Thursday, Feb. 27, 12:30 f».m. 

Sessions are also scheduled for tiie 

Natiiral Resources Management Center at I 

p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 19, and 

Thursday, Feb. 26. 

There, stiidents may sign up in the 

office of Dr. Wayne R. Longbrake, division 

director. 



SOaSPOIUGHTOMowta;, Feb. I*, IMt 



IM Sports / Action Actiyities 



Volleyball tooraament to begin 

A volleyball tournment begins today. Schedules are 
posted io the Recreation Center, in the Lifelong Education 
Center, and in the bardo Gymnasiuni. 

BASKETBALL SCHEDULES 
Basketball schedules are posted in the same locations as 
the volleyball schedules. 

ICE SKATING TRIP PLANNED 
An ice skating trip has been planned for this Thursday, 
Feb. 13. Sign-up is in the Recreation Center, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

The bus leaves at 5:30 p.m. from the Learning 
Resources Center bus loop. 

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI TRIP PLANNED 
A cross-country ski trip has been planned for this 
Thursday, Feb. 13. Sign-up is in the Recreation Center, 
Lifelong Education Center. The bus leaves at 3 p.m. from 
the Learning Resources Center bus loop. 

The trip will be cancelled if skiing conditions are not 
satisfactory. 

GYM TO BE CLOSED 
The Bardo Gymnasium will be closed from 6 to 9 p.m. 
tomorrow, Feb. 11. Participants in the volleyball clinic, 
however, will be admitted. 

The gym also will be closed this Thursday, Feb. 13, at 
10 p.m. and remain closed until 4 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 18. 
DOWNHILL SKI TRIP PLANNED 
A downhill ski trip has been planned for this 
Wednesday, Feb. 12. Sign-up is in the Recreation Center, 
Lifelong Education Center. The bus leaves the Learning 
Resources Center bus loop at 5 p.m. 

RECREATION CENTER CLOSED 
The Recreation Center will be closed at 3 p.m. this Fri- 
day, Feb. 14 and remain closed until 7 a.m., Tuesday, Feb. 
18. 




College 
Bowling 
Standings 
Reported 

Standings in the ABC 
BowUng Lanes' W.A.C.C. 
League were reported as of 
last week by the Lanes' 
management. Spots are still 
available for teams and 
individuals. The standings: 
TEAM STANDINGS 

1. Why Study, 3 wins, 
losses; 2. Sandbaggers, 3 
wins, losses; 3. F.B.N., 
wins, 3 losses; 4. No. 4, 
wins, 3 losses. 
HIGH TEAM SERIES 

1. Sandbaggers, 1886; 
2. Why Study, 1821; 3. No. 
4, 1661. 
HIGH TEAM SINGLE 

1. Sandbaggers, 683; 
2. Why Study, 660; 3. No. 4, 
579. 
MEN'S HIGH SERIES 

1. Rudy Long, 577; 
2. John Can, 566; 3. Todd 
Summers, 553. 
MEN'S HIGH SINGLE 

1. Todd Summers, 234; 
2. Rudy Long, 215; 3. John 
Can, 201. 
TOP THREE AVERAGES 

1. Rudy Long, 194; 

2. Dale Lingenfelter, 167; 

3. John Carr, 166. 




SPOTUGBTDMoidiy, Fefe. II, 1M<d31 

Peer Centter CoNrriNUES 
To Offer Support 

A special npoH hy Gayla Seffe, PIRC stuff mmbtr 

The Peer Infonnation and Referral Center continues to offer support and assistance 
for all students seeking help just as it has since its inception during the Spring of 1984. 

Although staff members do not offer professional counseling services, they are 
instrumental in aiding students in problem management, recognizing alternative options, 
and offering referrals to other sources within and outside the college system, if indicated. 

The Peer Center and its staff are concerned with keeping students enrolled by assisting 
them with personal problems and stress-causing issues (financial, housing, parents, exam 
anxiety, student-instructor conflict, etc.) as well as drug and alcohol-related problems 
which may hinder performance and course completion. 

Staff members who operate this service center consist of fellow students enrolled in 
various curriculums, including those students trained in the human services curriculum 

Its coordinators, Mrs. Kay Wagner, of Mill Hall, and Ms. Donna Erlston, of 
Danville, ensure - among their other responsibilities - the staff's ability to meet the 
program objectives and guarantee complete confidentiality in a comfortable and informal 
setting. 

The Peer Center, in Room 105 of the Bardo Gymnasium, encourages students to use 
the services provided. Members will strive to continue in their abiUty to listen, 
understand.and empathize. 



Financial Aid Applications 
Available; Help Offered 
In Filling Out Forms 

The 1986-87 apphcations for financial aid now are available in the Financial Aid Of- 
fice, Room 201, Academic Center, according to Donald S. Shade, financial aid director 

AU students plannmg to enroU for the 1986-87 year - including summer terms - must 
refile the new Pennsylvania sute grant and federal student aid form and the CoUege's own 
financial aid appUcation, the director said. 
FORMS MUST BE FILED BY END OF TfflS MONTH 

The deadline for the state grant, College work-study, and the supplemental grant pro- 
grams IS May. 1. o- F 

Students interested in College work-study for the summer or the academic year must 
have their forms filed by at least the end of this month in order for the results to reach 
the Fmancial Aid Office by the May 1 deadline. 

Students who need assistance in filling out the forms may make an apDointment in the 
Fmancial Aid Office, Shade said. 

Appointments are being taken for Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1 p.m. until 4:15 
p.m. 

"Make sure," the director said, "you have fiUed out as much of the form as possible 
and bnng along your 1985 tax return - as well as your parents' 1985 tax return if their 
information is required on the form." 



32a8PanJGHTaMoa4ir. Ftk. II, im 



Bulletin Board / 



Moiulay, Feb. li Oirough Sunday, Feb. 16 



MEETINGS 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... noon to 1 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. II, Room B107,- 
Lifelong Education Center (LEQ. 

Student Govenmient Association... executive, 4 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 11 
Room B107, LEC. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., this Wednesday, Feb. 12, Room 218, 
Academic Center. 

SPOTLIGHT... 3 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 11, Room B107, LEC. 
ACTIVITIES 

Gamma Epsilon Valentine's Dance... 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., this Wednesday, Feb. 12, 
Susquehanna Room; admission $1.50. 

Phi Beu Lambda Valentine's Dance... 9 p.m. to midnight, this Thunday, Feb. 13, 
Susquehanna Room; admission $1 person or J1.50 couple. 

Valentine's Day Flower Sale... 9 a.m., this Friday, Feb. 14, sponsored by trhe Hor- 
ticulture Club, Academic Center foyer and Susquehanna Room lobby. 

Employment OPPORTUNITIES 

lifformalm is provided by the College Placement Office personnel in the Learning Resources Center. 
Inquiries should be directed to them and not to this newspaper. 



Lycoming Data Services... Montoursville: Openings for business management or ac- 
counting students for telemarketing, part-time. Call Larry baraard at 368-8637 for an ap- 
pointment for an interview. 

King's Motel, South Williamsport... has an opening for a student in the foods pro- 
gram as a salad prep person. Must be strong enough to carry cases of produce. This may 
develop into a full-time job. Contact Rick Rosato at 322-4707 or 326-2S28. 

Tonight, February 10 



(2] Movies 

48 Horn 

and Trading Places 

boik starring Eddie Miuphy 

7 to 11 p.m. 

Free with WACC I.D. 
$1.00 without 

In ACC Auditorium 

Shown Uncut 
Sponsored by SGA 



Cillo's 


Yonr favorite Sobi ud 


College 
Comer 


Bargen the way yoD like *em 


Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
and win a half sob 


PHONE 

322-1321 


Four winners 
every week 


1100 W. Third SI. ^ * 
(Next to Academic Center) ^ 


Come OH over and get 
somttUn' good to eati 


Open for BrttASrat 
HOURS • Mod. Ihni Than. 


Jf * 


7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 i.in. to 4 p.m. 



*vacc 



^ftCH;.,.. 





Deejaying last Wednesday's WWAS-sponsored dance 
were James E. Mothersbaugh, broadcasting student 
from Muncy, and Denise A. Bonomo, broadcasting stu- 
dent from Pitman. [SPOTLIGHT photo by URoy S. Whit- 
mire Jr., of The SPOTLIGHT Staff] 
STORY, PAGE 32 




^1 



A 



Donation presented 

Mrs. Susan R. Kallansrud, jour- 
nalism student from Williamsport 
and chairperson of the Valentine 
message feature published Feb. 10 in 
the SPOTLIGHT, presented Mrs. 
Chris Smith, prevention of Blindness 
coordinator of the Lycoming County 
Association of the Blind (LCAB) with 
a check for $20.37 and 22 pair of 
4 eyeglasses for LCAB Remedial Eye 
I Care program last Wednesday. 
[SPOTLIGHT photo by Donna L. Trim- 
ble, of the SPOTLIGHT Staff] 



2 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

Sandbaggers maintain 
control of the alleys 



The Sandbaggers main- 
tained control in bowling at 
the ABC Lanes last week, 
with 10 wins and 2 losses. 
Last week's results, as fur- 
nished by the Lanes' 
management, are: 
Team standings 

1. Sandbaggers, with 10 
wins and 2 loses. 

2. F.B.N., with 7 wins 
and 5 losses. 

3. Why Study, with 7 
wins and 5 losses. 

High team series 

1. Why Study, 1863. 

2. F.B.N. , 1725. 

3. Sandbaggers, 1710. 
High team single 

1. Why Study, 687. 

2. Sandbaggers, 603. 

3. F.B.N., 598. 
Men's high series 

1. Rudy Long, 598. 

2. Mike Cotner, 541. 

3. Todd Summers, 535. 
Men's high single 

1. Rudy Long, 227. 

2. Mike Cotner, 222. 

3. Todd Summers, 213. 



Top three averages 

1. Rudy Long, 194. 

2. Todd Summers, 170. 

3. John Carr, 165. 



Sports playoffs 
to be held 

The volleyball playoffs 
are scheduled to begin 
Monday, March 10. The 
playoffs will be double 
elimination. 

The basketball playoffs 
will begin Monday, March 



Table tennis 
clinic scheduled 

A table tenrus clinic will 
be held on Tuesday, March 
4 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. A 
sign up sheet will be in the 
Recreation Center. 



Add One. . . from the adviser 

Comment by Anthony N. Cillo, 
faculty adviser to The SPOTLIGHT 

From time to time, it is pertinent to pause to com- 
ment upon this newspaper's goals and the efforts to 
which its staff goes to meet those goals. 

The SPOTLIGHT strives to provide students and 
others with information about happenings at the Col- 
lege. We maintain a regular, dependable vehicle to 
disseminate that information: Every Monday morning, 
there's The SPOTLIGHT! 

This is our commitment; this is our learning ex- 
perience. Those students who have fully committed 
themselves make many sacrifices to honor that 
commitment. 

We need to pause to remember that every once 
in a while. 



SPOTLIGHT 



The SPOTLIGHT is published 
weekly on Monday mornings 
except for official College vaca- 
tions by interested students. 
Opinions expressed are those 
of tne staff as a whole or of in- 
dividual writers and/con- 
tributors and do not reflect of- 
ficial institutional opinion. 
Office is in Room 7, Base- 
ment, Academic Center. 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761, 
Ext. 221. 

STAFF 
Wanna F. Brown 
Managing Editor 

Cynthia E. A. Hartranft 
Advertising Director 

Kathy L. Cobb 

Administrative Affairs Editor 

and Editorial Page Editor 

Sandra L, Musgrave 

Bureau Chief 

Academic Center 

LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. 
Photography Editor 

Lyle A. Wagner 
Production Coordinator 

Susan R. Kallansrud 

Bureau Chief 

Building Trades Center 

Catherine A. Hannon 
Bureau Chief 

Learning Resources Center 

Joel ]. Mader 

Bureau Chief 

Main Campus/Westside 

and Sports Reporter 

Donna L. Trimble 

Staff Associate 

and Photographer 

James E. Treese 

Chief Compositor 

and PMT Technician 



STAFF ASSISTANTS 

Lisa E. Secrist, Onev M. Wells, 

William J. Weatherwax, 

Donald S. Foye, 

Rose DiNardo. James K. 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 3 



College participates 

in successful 

campaign 

to assist the blind 



The College collected 
22 pair of eyeglasses as 
part of the January collec- 
tion campaign for the 
Lycoming County 
Association for the Blind 
(LCAB). The SPOTLIGHT 
featured a special Valen- 
tine message column on 
Feb. 10 and as a result, 
$20.37 was donated to the 
association's Remedial Eye 
Care program last 
Wednesday. 

Overall, the LCAB col- 
lected over 18,000 pair of 
used eyeglasses in January 
in the county campaign 
and surpassed the goal of 
14,000, according to Mrs. 
Chris Smith, LCAB 
prevention of blindness 
coordinator. 

The two local Burger 
King Restaurants, which 
offered a coupon good for 
a free hamburger for each 
pair of eyeglasses 
donated, netted an 
estimated 5,000 pair. The 
Williamsport Bureau of 
Fire collected over 2,000 
pair of glasses. The 
Lycoming Mall Merchants' 
Association reported 648 
pair. 

Others participate 

Several Lycoming 
Counry Lions Clubs par- 
ticipated and assisted in 
the distribution of drop- 
boxes throughout their 
areas. The Leos Club of 
South Williamsport High 
School also participated 
vrith a school-wide 
collection. 



Lenses and glasses 
with plastic frames are 
processed and shipped to 
New Eyes for the Needy 
in New Jersey where 
they will be recondition- 
ed and distributed 
throughout the world. 
However, funds obtained 
from the precious metals 
collected will remain in 
Lycoming County to sup- 
port the Association's 
Remedial Eye Care 
program. 

The LCAB Remedial 
Eye Care Program pro- 
vides partial payment for 
eye examinations and the 
purchase of glasses, con- 
tact lenses and pro- 
stheses to eligible 
residents of Lycoming 
County. 

The January eyeglass 
collection is a county- 
wide campaign to pro- 
mote collection of used 
eyewear for the preven- 
tion of blindness. The 
collection continues 
throughout the year. 

The collection this 
year was sponsored by 
the Lycoming LCAB in 
conjunction with the 
Williamsport Bureau of 
Fire, Local 736 I.A.F.F., 
area Burger King 
Restaurants and the 
Lycoming Mall Mer- 
chants' Association. 

In addition to the us- 
ed eyeglasses, hundreds 
of lenses and frames, old 
jewelry and used hearing 
aids were also collected. 




Volunteers h-om Pine Street United 
Methodist Church separate eyeglasses 
donated to the Lycoming County 
Association for the Blind's Remedial 
Eye Care program during January. 
The volunteer group has been involv- 
ed with this program since 1978. 
ISPOTUGHT photo by LeRoy S. Whit- 
mire Jr., of the SPOTLIGHT Staff. I 



4 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

Improperly Drained 
Sidewalks Cause 
Messy Walking 

Commentary by Daniel R. Partsch, diesel 
technology student from Sallx, Pa. 

As spring nears 
and warmer weather ap- 
proaches, more and 
more people will wall< 
to their destinations 
and leave their motor 
vehicles behind. But 
this causes a conflict. 
Why? 

The snow melting 
along the sidewalks on 
West Third Street and 
other adjoining streets 
causes pools of water 
to collect. This makes 
walking to school or the 
"corner store" a game 
of Jump and go. With 
most sections, the only 
practical way to avoid 
ruining your shoes and 
getting cold, wet feet is 
to walk on the elevated 
grass lines that border 
the sidewalks. With 
continuous use, this 
grassllne quickly turns 
to mud. 

These sidewalks 
are in pitiful condition. 
Obviously only elemen- 



tary engineering was 
used in the construc- 
tion of these inch thick 
slate waterholes. Over 
the years, the slate has 
shifted up and down, 
every which way but 
level. The only solution 
to prevent such an an- 
noyance from re- 
occuring Is the correct 
installation of new, pro- 
perly drained sidewalks. 

Is this to much to 
ask of the city of 
Williamsporl? 

The cost would be 
relatively inexpensive 
compared to the con- 
tribution It would make 
to this area. If the city 
refuses to make such 
an investment, the only 
other solution is for 
people to park their 
cars on the sidewalks 
and walk on the streets. 

At least that way 
you can salvage your 
shoes and prevent get- 
ting a coldl 



Assistance 
Offered, 
Few Take 
Advantage 

Two weeks ago the 
College set up and held 
Study Skills Seminars 
and Library Research 
Seminars to assist 
students who were ex- 
periencing academic dif- 
ficulties. Designed in 
concordance with the 
release of Early Warning 
Cards, these seminars 
were advertised well in 
advance so students 
could plan to attend and 
boost current grades 
before having to face 
mid-term exams. 

However, according 
to Dr. William J. Martin, 
dean of student services, 
only five students total 
attended the Study Skills 
Seminars, and five 
students total attended 
the Library Research 
Seminars. 

Why, when students 
complain about not be- 
ing able to handle course 
materials, do very few 
take advantage of 
assistance when it's be- 
ing offered, free of 
charge? 



'The Delta Force': 

A Quality Shoot-'Em-Up 

By William J. Weatherwdx of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Director Menahem Golan did a good job of rewriting history in the film 
about the hijacking of an airliner by Arab terrorist. "The Delta Force" is a grim 
reminder of the TWA jet last June. 

Golan did not, however, present the realistic scenario. Nor did he show us 
anything other than just another shoot-'em-up in a long line of shoot-'em-ups. 
While it's nice to see the United States at last strike back and give terrorists 
what they deserve, it's too bad it has to be in a movie of this quality. 

Please turn to Page 9 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 5 

Whaddya' say...? p.o,os .n. ,„...,.ws 

Question: With the large amount of *^^ """"^ '-■ Trimble 

snowfall this season, what winter ac- o' The spotlight staif 

tivities were you invloved in? m/«,«,„ oo^^w ^ ~. 

' Where asked: Gymnasium 




Wendy A. Foust, of Troy, Jack G. Schultz, of Haver- Kimberly A. Bowman, of 

secretarial science student: town, nursery management; Millville, brodcasting: "I en- 

"Volleyball, skiing, and being "Skiing, sledding, and bumper joyed a ski trip and sledding. I 

stranded In Wllliamsport with jumping." wish I could have done more; 

Schoonle." I love the winter." 




Gary T. Shiley, of Williams Ronald Lindsey, of Franklin, Lisa F. Schoonover, of Troy, 

Valley, machine shop: construction carpentry: "Ski- human services student: "Skl- 

"Volleyball." ing, snowmobiling, and basket- ing and volleyball." 
ball." 



6 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

Singles of 85': 
Cream of the Crop 

Commentary on Music 

By James K. Morrlssey, ol The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The SPOTLIGHT'S Feb. 3 issue (for anyone who can remember bacK that 
far) carried a piece of musical commentary about the 10 "worst pop singles o( 

^^^ortunately, not every song released last year lived up to the awfulness of 
the losers on that list. Bearing this idea In mind, here is a rundown of the 10 
best In reverse order. 
10. Walking On Sunshine (Katrlna and the Waves) 

9 Glory Days (Bruce Springsteen) 

8. Some Uke It Hot (Power Station) 

7 Smalltown Boy (BronskI Beat) 

6 Running Up That Hili (Kate Bush) 

5 Aii She Wants To Do Is Dance (Don Henley) 

4. Tight Connection To l^y Heart (Bob Dylan) 

3. Can't Get There From Here (R.E.Ivl.) 

2. Money For Nothing (Dire Straits) 

1. Sun City (Artist United Against Apartheid) 

Katrlna and The Waves made their bigtime debut with something so bright 
and snappiiy optimistic it just couldn't fail. Springsteen's realism was good but 
falntiv bizarre when it's remembered that he wrote "Blinded By The Light , a 
big hit for Manfred Mann's Earth Band in 1976. 

Made 'em sizzle 

Tony Thompson's drumwork and the fiawiess production of Nile Rodgers 
made the Power Station sizzie. BronskI Beat had the pleasing elements of ge- 
nuine emotion, funk and a singer who gave an unintentionally great Tiny Tim 
Impersonation. 

In the world of female pop singers, Kate Bush was a rare occurrence 
because she had talent as well as beauty. She didn't need gigantic earrings, 
revealing clothing, or an exaggerated display of her sexuality to distract atten- 
tion from her music and lyrics. 

Result was spectacular 

The most interesting ex-Eagie (besides Joe Waish), proved to be Don 
Heniey. When Bob Dylan stopped preaching and started layering his lyrics 
again, the result was a spectacular comeback. 

R E.M. finally lived up to their potential to be one of the best bands of the 
decade. If only Michael Stipe, their lead vocalist, would quit that mumbling! 
Whether you took Dire Straits seriously or not, their ode to MTV and its "yo- 
yos" was still memorable for some good solid guitar. Sting's backup vocals 
didn't hurt either. 

It figures... 

Finally, 1985 was the year of the "benefit records". "We are The World 
was sort of sugary sweet, but "Sun City" was downright angry. Springsteen, 
Dylan, and a cast of thousands made a record which pulled no punches in its 
rhetoric. . . , ,. , 

"Sun Citv." the most timeiv. most outspoken and vital piece of vinyl barely 
scraped In to the Top Forty while inspired social commentary like Eddie Mur- 
phy's "Party Ail The Time" went to number two and sold over a half a million 
copies. It figures. 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 

AVTS students honored 

As part of Vocational Education Week, Feb. 9 to 15, outstanding 
vocational technical school (AVTS) students were honored on Mon- 
day, Feb. 10 in an awards ceremony sponsored by the College. 

Students and teachers from 34 secondary vocational schools par- 
ticipated in this first-time event which was held in the Academic 
Center Auditorium. 

According to Dr. Edward M. Geer, director of secondary vocational 
programs, criteria pertaining to the wirmers were left to each local 
AVTS. 

That morning, local VICA (Vocational Industrial Club of America) 
students served as hosts during the tour of the College facilities. 

A luncheon in Le Jeune Chef was held preceding the awards 
ceremony. 

During the award ceremony, each student was escorted by a 
representative from his or her school. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College president, and Dr. Jerry Olson, direc- 
tor of the Pennsylvania Department of Education's Bureau of Voca- 
tional and Adult Education, presented the awards. ^^^ paces >■*■»■ 




VICA here 



The local chapter of the Vocational Industrial Club of America, VICA, was the 
host for the Area Vocational Technical School, AVTS, ceremony held at the Col- 
lege Feb. 10. Standing left to right are seniors: Tim S. Snyder, drafting student 
from Hughesville; Jeff H. Russell, electrical occupations student from Hughesville; 
Scott A. Watson, eletrical occupations student from Warrior Run; Mike F. Hoff- 
man, electrical occupations student from Hughesville. Adviser for electrical occupa- 
tion is M. Keith Wynn. Adviser for drafting is Edward L. Roadarmel. ISPOTUGHT 
Photo by Donna L. Trimble, of the SPOTLIGHT Staff.] 



8 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

AVTS awards... 

Dr Olson was the guest speaker. Dr. Olson emphasized that eve.y student, 
teacher and others involved must have a dear understanding of vocational 
education and that the program must continue to be kept m the ta.f 8^^ 

Dr Olson also praised the CoUege's faciUKes in the vocational educational 
sections. 

AVTS students and teachers mcluded; r-„„«h,- 

Robert Steinbacher, a commercial art student from Eastern Montgomery County, 
instructor, Ralph Arnold, automated machining technolo^. „. . . 

John Curtis, an auto service student from Harrisburg-Steelton-Highspire; 
in<itTuctor Paul R. Sweikert, auto service. 

™'zimmerman, an auto mechanics student from Jefferson County; mstructor, 

''■""he''^"i.'"S^s'rn' data processing student from Eastern Northampton County; 
instructor, Carmela R. Heard, data processmg^ u « ,„„ Tmmfv 

Jay Bollinger, an electrical occupations student from Huntmgton County, 
instructor, Richard Hoover, auto mechanics 

Salvatore Salci, audiovisual communications student from wakes-Barre, 
instructor, Stephen J. Martin, audiovisual communicarions. ^ _ , . 

Mark Edmondson, drafting and design technology student from Dauphm 
County; instructor, Clark Lindsay, drafting and design technology. 

Tim HUdebrand, pattemmaking student from Lancaster County; mstructor. 
Norm Franck, electronics. 

Michele Johnson, health assistant student from Lancaster County; mstructor, 
Clarence Graham, appliance repair. ■ »_ , 

Jennifer L. Myford, cosmetology student from Lancaster County; mstructor, 
Edward deCheubell, carpentry. 

Andrew Carson, drafting design technology student from North Montco, 
instructor, Abram Diehl, drafting. , ... , ^ ^ • ,i„„^„. 

Tammy J. Frantz, computer systems student from Lehigh County; mstructor, 
Joseph C. Genits, welding. ,_ j . c 

Jim Moore, president of Pennsylvania VICA, electrical occupations student from 
Indiana County; instructor. Ken Snyder, electrical occupations. 

Gerald Hale, drafting and design technology student from Schuylkill County; 
instructor, Hugh Dougherty, masonry. 

Carolyn Kimmel, cosmetology student from Schuylkill County; mstnictor, Ron 
Reinoehl, painting and decorating. x, u ^i. . i-„„„f„. 

Anthony N. Pastor, machine technology student from Northern Chester County, 
instructor, Robert Lange, macfiine technology. 

Lisa Amos, quantity foods student from the Western Area; mstructor, Carol 
Bevec marketing and distributive education. 

Lori Counterman, horticulture student from Monroe County; instructor, Robert 
Metzgar, masonry. 

Maria R. Kosmer, cosmetology student from Northumberland County; mstructor, 

Neil Muthler, automotive body repair student from Keystone Central; instructor, 
Harold Rogers, automotive body repair. 

Randy Kirsch, drafting and design technology student from Admiral Peary; 
instructor, Robert J. Wilk, drafting and design technology 

William Pengelly, heating student from Western Montgomery County; instructor, 
Robert Mutschler, horticulture. 

Lodge Walker, an auto mechanics student from Greene County; instructor, 
Kathryn Bamberger, health assistant. 

Bonita Brogden, health assisting student from Altoona; instructor, Joseph 
Schamris, millwork and cabinetmaking. 

Please turn to Page 9 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 9 



.v3 



f 



H (^ 



1 



NIGHT IN THE GYM... 

Scum Buzzards beat the boms, 30 to 16, in the second game played last Tuesday 

night. [SPOTLIGHT photo by Russell ]. Phillips, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff] 

AVTS awards 

Continued from Page 8 

Sharon Wolff, health assistant program student from Clarion County; instructor, 
Beatrice Lauffer, health safety and attendance officer. 

Larry Miller, machine tool operation student from Juniata-Mifflin County; 
instructor, Donald Brought. 

Robbie Brenneman, drafting and design technology student from Juniata-Mifflin 
County; instructor, Paul Yetter, drafting. 

Mark Milisits, cabinetmaking student from Bethlehem; instructor, Robert 
Hammersmith, cabinetmaking. 



'The Delta 
Force' 

...Continued from Page 4 



Chuck Norris is "same- 
old" in his performance as 
the major. He kilis lots of 
Arabs-and one can tell he 
likes it. It's nice to see 
Lee Marvin again; he's 
great as the Delta Force 
commander. George Ken- 
nedy is back as a priest — 
reminiscent of all thos 
disaster movies of the late 
Seventies. 



It's just too bad that 
people will pay money to 
see a movie which 
capitalizes on the 
atrocities committed by 
real-life terrorists, but 
there are a lot of disap- 
pointments at the movies 
lately. 

Guess you gotta see 
'em to believe 'em. 



10 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

P.l.R.C. coordinators: Profile... 



Mrs. Kay F. Wagner 



Mrs Kay F. Wagner and Ms. Donna L. Erlston, fourth semester 
human services students are coordinators of the Peer Information and 
Referral Center (P.l.R.C.) for Spring 1986. 

Mrs Wagner and Ms. Erlston are both using the Center as their 
practicum. They succeed Sharon Doebler and Sharon Andrus who 
were the Fall 1985 coordinators. 

Mrs. Wagner's and Ms. Erlston's duties as coordinators of the 
Center are varied but the main duty is to supervise. 

Other duties include devising and maintaining a schedule tor the 
Center for the staff, which includes four members - Bernadine Rutan, 
Lisa Waite, Laurie Dynda, and Gayla Selfe who are the two coor- 
dinatores and the volunteers -- making sure there are two students in 
the Center during the posted hours, having regular meetings with 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of Advisement and Career Services 
and principal supervisor of the program, giving information or refer- 
rals to students within the College and community, and relahng and 
emphathizing with problems of the students who come to the Center. 
Mrs. Wagner, who is married and lives in MUl HaU, commented, 
"I'm learning about the managerial duties, the atmosphere is much 
like a human services agency." 

She added, "We -- Donna and I -- try to hit a balance and we consult 
in decisions before action." 

Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities, was 
very instrumental in the originiation of the Center, Mrs. Wagner 
stated. p. ^t. PAGE 1 1*" 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 11 



Ms. Donna L. Erlston 




Ms. Erlston, who is single and from Danville, commented, "I 
realize the responsibility involved in a human services agency... in the 
management position." 

She added, "Kay and 1... We don't do anything pertaining to the 
Center 'til we get each other's consent." 

The Center, she noted, is not just for human services students; 
students from other programs of study may volunteer their services, 
too. 



Business 
division 
begins 

Open House 
planning 



The Business and Com- 
puter Technologies Division 
personnel are making plans 
for Open House activities, 
according to Mrs. Bonnie R. 
Taylor, associate professor. 

The College's Open 
House this year will be on 
Sunday, March 16. 

Microcomputers will be 
available for hands-on ex- 
perience and the Audio- 
Visual Tutorial Individualiz- 
ed Learning Center will be 
on display. 

The computer science 
section will be open. 



Word processing 
demonstrations, a slide tape 
presentation, and tours are 
being planned. 

The department will 
have display windows on 
the first floor of the 
Academic Center. 

Information will be 
posted on the bulletin 
boards, and refreshments 
will be served. 

Literature will also be 
available. There will be a 
door prize registration. Ex- 
iting prizes will be offered 
as well. 



^I fti M WlWi aWWiWa i MtCM SKa^jj ^ iB^^ 



12 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

'Minimesters' 
to begin in April 

The College plans to institute a new concept called the "Minimester" this April, 
according to Dr. James E. Middleton, dean of academic affairs. The minimester will 
offer courses of one to three aedits, with durations of "anywhere from a few days 
to eight weeks." Dr. Middleton said. 

"In the past several years, the College's programming has recognized that its 
students, potential students, and service area are not just full-time, fresh-from-high 
school individuals looking for job preparation or college transfers," Dr. Middleton 
stated. 

Therefore, the College has decided to take a new approach, by modifying its ex- 
isting programs, and developing new programs to try to meet the needs of other 
people in a broader commur\ity. 

The mirumester will give current students the "opportunity to explore new 
areas, add new skills, and expand interest they already have without a major long- 
time commitment," he said. 

The most important factor, according to Dr, Middleton, is the College's concern 
for adult students who are currently in the work force, but who would like to 
upgrade and expand their skills. '"The time factor is extremely important," he 
stated. 

"We want to try to arrange to offer some type of an evening meal, so that peo- 
ple can come straight from work, take a course, and not miss dinner," he added. 

This high accessibility is in keeping with the College's long-range plan. Dr. Mid- 
dleton stated. 

The types of courses to be offered vary widely, according to Dr, Middleton. 
Although all decisions have not been finalized, he stated that some courses which 
might be offered are word processing, leadership skills, home remodeling, applied 
ethics, specialized government topics, Russian civilization, children's education, 
criminal justice, and several specialty food and hospitality courses such as extra 
chocolate work, bread and roU baking, and dessert baking. 

Dr. Middleton also stated that several non-credit courses might be offered, such 
as consumer education, and personal finance management. 

He stated that the entire concept would be highlighted at the College's Open 
House, which is scheduled for Sunday, March 16, 12-4:30 p.m. At that time, in- 
terested persons will be given a chance to ask questions, and consider, arrangments. 

Dr. Middleton also stated that the niimimester concept will be advertised 
through the newspaper media, and targeted mailers will be sent to businesses which 
would benefit by the program. 

The mirumester concept is expected to bolster College enrollment, and minimize 
the need for overall budget cuts, according to Dr. Middleton. 

"The minimester concept will be a big "win" for people and businesses in the 
community, for they will be given the opportunity to enhance individual skills and 
competencies," he said. 



CAS'HNG CALL FOR COLLEGE COMMERCIAL: Interested students, faculty, and 
staff should contact Steve McDonald in the Media Center, Room 201, Learning 
Resources Center, before March 11. Casting is open to all students, faculty, and 
staff of the College. 




MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 13 




Out of the Weather 



The Williamsport Bureau of 
Transportation began installation of a 
bus shelter on the south side of West 
Third Street, at Susquehanna Street, 
during the week of Jan. 27. But due 
to the weather, the actual date of 
completion was Feb. 20, according to 
David Kilmer, planning administrator 
of the WET. [SPOTLIGHT photos. Up- 
per photo by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. and 
side photo by Donna L. Trimble both of 
The SPOTLIGHT Staff] 



14 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

What's cookin' this week 
at Le Jeune Chef? 
Menu for (he Week 



Susquehanna Room 



Monday, March 3 

Lunch: Spaghetti and 
sausage, Italian bread, 
$2.19; beef pot pie, 
vegetable, $2.59. 

Dinner: Baked fish, 
shrimp sauce, potato, and 
vegetable, $2.79; roast pork, 
gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59. 

Soup: Homemade soups 
served daily. 



Tuesday, March 4 

Lunch: Franks and 
sauerkraut, $1.99; deep- 
fried shrimp, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59. 

Dinner: Roast beef, 
potato and vegetable, $2.89; 
Swedish meatballs, potato 
and vegetable, $2.39. 



Wednesday, March 5 

Lunch: Macaroni and 
cheese, and vegetable, 
$2,19; turkey breast, filling, 
gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.39. 

Dinner: Linguine/red 
clam sauce, Italian bread, 
$2.89; Swiss steak, potato 
and vegetable, $2.89. 



Thursday, March 6 

Lunch: French dip, potato 
and vegetable, $2.59; chop- 
ped sirloin, gravy, potato 
and vegetable, $2.39. 

Dinner: Chicken and 
biscuits, and vegetable, 
$2.39; filled meatloaf, $2.59. 



Offerings this week at Lejeune Chef, the 
student-operated restaurant in the Lifelong 
Education Center are: 

Wednesday, March 5 
Closed due to a preparation. 

Thursday, March 6 

Special: Old fashion country pie, broccoli w/ 
holfandaise sauce, roll and beverage. 

Soup: Poland's International soup. 

Light lunch: Chinese chicken salad, cup of 
soup, roll and beverage. 

Desserts: Ice cream sundaes, peach jelly roll, 
apple dumpling. 

Friday, March 7 

Special: Cheese lasagna, petite toss salad w/ 
Italian dressing, rolls and beverage. 

Soup: French onion soup. 

Desserts: Cranberry apple cobbler, fresh fruit 
rainbow sundaes, raspberry meringue torte. 



Friday, March 7 

Lunch: Beef and pep- 
pers, potato and vegetables, 
$2.59; baked ziti, Italian 
bread, $2.19. 



The Susquehanna Room 
will have a daily breakfast 
special. The sandwich bar 
will be serving steak sand- 
wiches, barbeques, and chili 
on a daily basis. 



The Susquehanna Room 
will be closed at 1 p.m. on 
March 5. The Room will be 
closed at 2 p.m. on March 
6. The early closings are 
due to special functions. 



Quantity 
dinners 
group has 
only two 
openings 

Quantity Dinners by 
Creative Kitchens have 
announced that they have 
openings for orJy two dates 
- Monday March 24, and 
Monday, March 31. 

Each has 40 seats 
available. Please call in 
advance for reservations. 
Dinners for the rest of the 
semester are filled to 
capacity with reservations. 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 15 



16 students receive 
Wheel Inn scholarships 



Sixteen students have 
been selected as the reci- 
pients of the 1985-1986 
Wheel Inn scholarships of 
$500 each. 

Students from Bradford, 
Lycoming, Sullivan, and 
Tioga Counties who are 
enrolled in floriculture, 
nursery management, 
forestry, agribusiness, and 
dairy management and who 
have the highest grade 
point average were selected. 

This marks the third year 
in which the Wheel Inn has 
contributed $8,000 for the 
scholarships at the College. 

The Wheel Inn is a social 
club in Tioga County. 

The recipients are: 

~ Todd N. Bacon, a 
nursery management stu- 
dent from Bradford County. 

~ Tina M. Barrett, 
floriculture student from 
Bradford County. 



~ Stephen F. Bell, 
nursery management stu- 
dent from Lycoming 
County. 

~ Diane M. Bongiovi, 
floriculture student from 
Lycoming County. 

- Russell D. Bowen, 
agribusiness student from 
Tioga County. 

- Gary R. Brungard, 
nursery management stu- 
dent from Lycoming 
County. 

- Crystal Childs, 
floriculture student from 
Lycoming County. 

~ Linda K. Dietz, nursery 
management student from 
Lycoming County. 

- Michael A. Dincher, 
forestry student from 
Lycoming County. 

~ Timothy S. Fenster- 
macher, forestry stuent 
from Lycoming County. 



COlo's 

College 
Coroer 

PHONE 

322-1321 

1100 W. Third St. 

(Next to Academic Center) 

Come on over and gel 
somefhin ' good to eoll 



Yoor favorite Sobs and 
Bargen the way yon like *eni 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and win a half snb 

Four winners 
every week 



Open for Brealffast 



HOURS • Men. tbm Than. 
7:30 a.m. to ( p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to i p.m. 



~ Ruby L. Gillespie, 
floriculture student from 
Lycoming County. 

- Julie D. Gray, 
floriculture student from 
Lycoming County. 

- Barbara K. Heisey, 
agribusiness student from 
Lycoming County. 

- Rae M. Lowe, 
floriculture student from 
Tioga County. 

~ Stephen R. Ross, 
forestry student from 
Lycoming County. 

~ Dianne J. Waldron, 
nursery management 
student from Lycoming 
County. 



STUDENT 
HOUSING 

Famished Rooms 

Sin|les, DoDbles, 

Apartments available 

ALL UTILITIES 
INCLUDED 

Showers and kitchen 
facilities 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine Ave. 
and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 
Both within one |1| 

block of WACC 

Phone 326-6536 



16 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 




Three senators and an 
adviser attended the 1986 
PhiJadelphia Regional 
Leadership Conference on 
"Synergy ", working 
together, held at Cedar 
Crest College, Allentown, 
on Feb. 22. 

Gregory S. Lange, ac- 
counting and business 
management student from 
Lock Haven, and Student 
Government Association 
president, led the delega- 
tion from the College. 
Others attend 

Others who attended 
were Joshua J. Burke, 
graphic arts student from 
York; Wanna F. Brown, 
journalism student from 
Port Trevorton, and Ms. 
Sandra Rhone, SGA adviser 
from Williamsport. 

Twenty colleges - com- 
munity, junior, and four- 
year — were represented. 
Stresses togetherness 

The conference began 
with a keynote address by 
Dr. Mark vanderHeyden, 
vice president and dean of 
faculty at Cedar Crest. 

He stressed that, in 
regard to student govern- 
ment, students, faculty, and 
administration must all 
work together (synergy) as 
a team to achieve a goal. 

Dr. vanderHeyden also 
said that if students don't 
learn synergy in college, 
they won't learn it in the 
outside world because too 
many people work in 
competition. 

The speaker stated that 
the ultimate goal of college 



is to better understand 

yourself and then "you'll 

be able to understand 

others". 

Workshops presented 

The rest of the day was 
broken dowTi into 
workshop sessions focusing 
on stress management, 
leadership, getting and 
keeping a committee, time 
management, marketing 
your events, many pur- 
poses/one goal, and 
microcomputers. 

In the "many pur- 
poses/one goal" presenta- 
tion, the discussion and 
debate revolved around the 
importance of students, 
faculty, and staff working 
together to make each col- 
lege successful. 

Ray Becker, director of 
student activities at 
Widener University, 
Chester, presented a work- 
ing formula of "forma- 
tion/recruitment, develop- 
ment/training, and motiva- 
tion/retention" to make a 
successful committee in 
each orgaiuzation. 

A group wrap-up 
followed with summary 
reported of all sessions be- 
ing presented. 

Nellie Manges, dean of 
students at Cedar Crest, in 
that session, told the group 
that students "do have a 
voice" in what goes on at 
their college and that they 
should be heard. 

The coixference conclud- 
ed with a reception in the 
Tompkins College Center 
lounge. 



SGA 

reps attend 

conference 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 17 



Dairy herd management 
alumni hold seminar 

[This article was submitted fry Peter Delance Emick, dairy herd management instructor,] 

The College's Dairy Herd Management Alumni Association conducted its second 
annual management seminar on Feb. 12 in the Academic Center Auditorium. 

The speakers were Tom Jurchak, Lackawanna County Extension; Dr. Francis 
Fox, Cornell University; Dr. Jcimes Ferguson, University of Pennsylvania; Dr. 
Richard Adams, Pennsylvania State University, and Alpheus Ruth, president of 
Lehigh Valley Farmers. Each gave a presentation in his or her distinct field. 

Jurchak discussed milk pricing and the dairy situation. He included in his topic 
the involvement of government in milk pricing and production including the latest 
government proposal, the Dairy TerminaHon Program, which is aimed at reducing 
the annual production of milk by 12 billion pounds in a 140 billion pound market. 

In this program, those dairymen participating will submit a bid for monies to be 
received equivalent to one year's production. In retvim, the dairyman must eliminate 
all his dairy cattle. 

Aimed at reduction 

Dairymen must also have no interest in dairy and not allow their land or facilities to 
be used for dairy productton for a period of five years. 

The Dairy Termination Program will be financially supported by a .40 cent per 
hundredweight assessment on the producers approximate Sll/cwt (100 pounds) 
price. It is aimed at reducing our national dairy surplus. 

Dr. Fox talked about herd health, giving preventative measures to increase one's 
profits by decreasing potentially expensive treatments. He reiterated the old cliche: 
an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. 

Nutrition discussed 

Dr. Ferguson discussed the research and economics of embryo transfer and artificial 
insemination in dairy cows. He summarized that it was not profitable to use embryo 
transfer to only increase milk production. In artificial insemination, the use of sires 
costing more than $15 a breeding wasn't economical as the heritability of milk pro- 
duction was only 20 percent. 

Dr. Adams discussed nutrition in the 1990s. He talked about feed additives and 
growth hormones to increase production and efficiency. 

Dr. Adams stressed the need for proper basic nutrition and management before 
the advanced feeding technique will yield any profits. 

Ruth summed up the seminar and gave his viewpoints on dairying, drawing 
from his 30-plus years of experience. He emphasized that farming is no more dif- 
ficult now than when he started. Success all comes down to proper management 
and the willingness to accept new and changing ideas, he said. 



WM'iaw a M W WiwMii.wwisiii i ii ii iiliM 



18 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

'Goodbye Charlie' cast chosen; 
performance opens April 23 



The cast of "Goodbye 
Charlie", a play to be 
presented by the College in 
cooperation with the 
Williamsport Players, has 
been announced, according 
to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of College 
activities. 

The cast includes Jerry 
Noviello, Bill Houseman, 
Diane Gailit, Nancy 
Hinston, Marga Ryersbach, 
and David Person. 

Auditions were open to 
students, faculty, staff, and 
residents of the community 
at large, Mrs. Fremiotti 
said. 

The stage manager is 
Tracy Zinck. The play is 
directed by Tom Ryersbach. 
Properties will be handled 



by Dianne Conway. 

The play is about a rein- 
carnation of a "Don Juan" 
to a female -- an identity 
crisis and a role reversal. 

The play will run from 
April 23 through April 26. 
Performances are at 8 p.m. 
in the Academic Center 
Auditorium. 

Ticket prices are $2 for 
students, faculty, and staff 
with College ID and $5 for 
general admission. 

Reservations may be 
made and ticket iriformation 
may be obtained at the 
Recreation Center Office, 
Room A137, Lifelong 
Education Center, or by 
telephoning College Ext. 
763 or 327-4763. 




ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIQHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Snaeks 

Hoi and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 



BENSON 




Off! mini, ^ 
l^nt market 



Corner of 3rcl and Maynard Sts. 



^ 



Business 
conference 
to be held 
Thursday 



On Thursday, the 
Future Business Leaders 
Region 7 Conference will be 
held at the College, accor- 
ding to Paul W. Goldfeder, 
assistant professor of 
business administration and 
Phi Beta Lambda adviser. 

Registration will be held 
in front of the Academic 
Center Auditorium from 
2:15 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. with 
the first general session to 
follow. 

Twenty-three com- 
petitive events among the 
approximate 200 students 
from 12 area high schools 
are scheduled to begin at 
3:30 p.m. and conclude at 
5:30 p.m. 

A dance, dinner and 
presentation of competition 
awards will complete the 
activities of the day. 

Phi Beta Lamnbda 
members assisting with the 
conference are Lonnie 
Reinard, Richard Evans Jr., 
Judy Folmar, Lisa Folmar, 
Barbara Bratton, Susan 
Kallansrud, Christine 
Barbera, William Shannon, 
and Mike Kerr. 

They will assist with 
registration, hospitality, test 
correcting, and will act as 
dance chaperones. 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 
WANTED: Crutches. 
Anyone having a pair and 
not wanting them, please 
donate them to the nurse, 
Room 104, gymnasium. She 
uses them as "loaners". 



m^ 






h 



r ' 



'5^ 

A NIGHT IN THE GYM... 

As the SPOTLIGHT photographer visited 
the gym one evening last week, there was 
lots of activity — including these students 
hustling for rebound during an intramural 
basketball game. ISPOTLIGHT photo] 



UA V.I.P. 

MOVIE 

TICKETS 

$2.50 to students 

with validated I.D. 

Sponsored by SGA 

Available in Rec 

Center office 
Room A137 (LEC) 




An alternative 
greeting card and 
party goods store 
with; 

•stationery by the pound 
•confetti by the scoop 
•SNIGLETS greeting 

cards and bool^s 
•THE FAR SIDE greeting 

cards 
•pens, pencils, and 

novelties 



■^PECTEnU 



434 Wllllim SIrMI 



TRAINED TEMP. CARE 

provides 

FREE "SFTTER" SERVICES 

Requirements are: 

1. Residents of 
Northumberland County 

2. You must have a mentally handicapped 
citizen residing in your household. 

Call 286-3015 

This program is a service of: 

THE EASTER SEAL SOCIETY 
OF CENTRAL PA. 

All sitters are trained through the Easter Seal ! 
Campaign to care for the mentally 
handicapped. 



20 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 



Candy's dandy 
-- or is it? 
No, says nurse 



Information pwvuied 

by Mrs. janrt R Quenmil, R.N 

Cclkgt Nunt 

It's 1:15 p.m., during 
gym class, and you're on 
your 14th sit-up going for 
150... thiiiking that a candy 
bar you substituted for 
lunch will help. 
Probably not. 
You might get a sudden 
rush of quick energy after 
eating one, but that's tem- 
porary. What almost always 
follows is a feeling of 
hunger, irritability, and 
sleepiness. 
Why does this happen? 
After you eat a high con- 
centration of sweets, the 
sugar is absorbed quickly 
into the bloodstream. This, 
in turn, triggers the pan- 
creas to secrete a larger- 
than-normal amount of in- 
sulin in an attempt to bring 
the blood sugar level back 
to normal. 

As the blood sugar falls, 
so does your energy level. 
In no time, you will cer- 
tainly feel light-headed, 
shaky, uncoordinated, and 
hungry. 

True "energy snacks" in- 
clude apples, oranges, 
bananas, raisins, vegetables, 
popcorn, nuts, lowfat 
yogurt, and cheese. 

Because of the fiber and 
protein in these car- 
i)ohydrate sources, the 
breaking down process 
takes much longer than 
quick energy foods. 

As a result, the blood 
sugar rises slowly, sustain- 
ing energy. 




Acrobatic show 
to be part 
of Symposium 
on campus 



Team from Cillo's Sports Center, Montrousville, will 
present a springboard acrobatic show in the College 
Gymnasium on Friday, AprU 4, at 10 a.m. The show is 
being held in conjunction with the Business Sym- 
posium to be held on campus that day. The group will 
present a routine and a tumbling show. Other persons 
who have gymnastic programs will be invited to par- 
ticipate as well, according to Symposium represen- 
tatives. In the photo are: Top, Diana Knowlden, of 
Williamspott; middle, left, Danielle M. Morrett, of 
Williamsport, Missy Whipple, of Montoursville, Shan- 
non Keller, of Montoursville, and bottom, left, Laura 
M. Maietta, of Montoursville, Chris E. Hula, of Mon- 
toursville, and Lindsay M. France, of Williamsport. 
ISPOTLIGHT photo by LeRoy S. Whitmire Ir of The 
SPOTLIGHT Staff] ' 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 21 



Publicity about PHEAA 
misleading, director says; 
check Financial Aid Office 



SPECIAL LATE REPORT 

By Donald S. Shade, financial aid director 

IThis report is presented verbatim as a service to students interested in financial aid.) 

An article appeared in state newspapers recently announcing that the governor 
has increased PHEAA grants to a maximum of $2,000, effective immediately. 

Many students have stopped in to the Financial Aid Office with questions about 
this increase for the current year. 

The article was misleading in its account of the increased award. The governor 
has authorized an increase in the maximum award from $1,500 to $2,000, but the ac- 
tual amount of the maximum award depends on the budget that the state has given 
the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency. 

Based on PHEAA's budget for 1985-86, and the governor's increase of the max- 
imum award amount, the maximum grant can now be $1,650 instead of $1,500. 
PHEAA reports that 19,000 letters will be going out this week to students who will 
be affected by the increase from $1,500 to $1,650. Students not affected will not 
receive a letter. 

Maximum awards for 1986-87 will remain at $1,650 unless PHEAA's budget for 
the 1986-87 year is increased. Since new budget figures will not be determined until 
the end of June, PHEAA will process all awards with the $1,650 maximum. Once 
the budget has been determined, and if there is an increase in the maximum award 
beyond $1,650, the students will be notified. 

Any student having questions about the governor's actions should contact the 
Financial Aid Office. 



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22 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 



I 

^Foundation 

elects 



The College Foundation 
recently elected its 1986 
board an an annual meeting 
during the first week in 
February. 

According to Frederick 
T. Gilmour, executive direc- 
tor of the foundation, 
Peyton D. McDonald, vice 
president and manager of 
E. F. Hutton and Co., 
Williamsport, was re-elected 
president of the board. 
Others elected 

Also elected to serve on 
this year's board were 
James E. Short, president of 
Jesco Athletic Co., 
Williamsport, as the board 

■ president, and Mrs. 



of Williamsport; Allen E. 
Ertel, attorney, of 
Williamsport; Matthew T. 
Gibbs, president of Gibbs 
Pontiac-Buick-Opel 
Hughesville. 

Also, Donald G. 
Holtzman, manager of 
Packing Specialties 
Unlimited, Jersey Shore; J. 
Paul Martin, president of 
Lycoming Silicia Sand Co., 
Montoursville. 

Also, John B. McMur- 
trie, of Williamsport; Jack 
Minnier, account executive 
for AT&T Communications, 
WSest Shore Office Center, 
Harrisburg. 

William Pickelner, presi- 



% h03rd Carline M. Waltman, presi- 


dent, Pickelner Fuel Oil 


' "^ dent of Labels by Pulizzi, 


Co., Williamsport; Theodore 


Inc., of Williamsport, as 


H. Reich, president, Jersey 


secretary-treasurer . 


Shore State Bank, 


According to Gilmour, 


Williamsport; V. Jud 


seven new members were 


Rogers, general manager for 


appointed to the board. 


the Sunday GRIT, 


They are: 


Williamsport. 


Robert W. Belter, presi- 


John A. Savoy, presi- 


dent of Belter's, 


dent, John A. Savoy & Son 


Williamsport. 


Inc., Montoursville; John A. 


Robert M. Bums, of 


Schultz, president, Jersey 


Muncy. 


Shore Steel Co., South 


Thomas B. Keller, cer- 


Avis, and Albert R. Styr- 


tified public accountant 


cula, president. Valley 


with Dreese, Gearhart, 


Farms Dairy Inc., 


Keller and Associates, 


Williamsport. 


Williamsport. 


College personnel for 


Ann S. Pepperman, at- 


the board include Dr. 


torney with McNemey, 


Robert L. Breuder, College 


page, Vanderlin and Hall, 


president; Dr. Miles D. 


Williamsport; Ann Marie 


Williams, dean of employee 


Phillips, Williamsport. 


and community relations; 


Ann F. Plankenhorn, of 


Mrs. Kathryn W. Lumley, 


Williamsport. 


chairperson of the College 


John H. Saeger, vice 


Board of Trustees, and 


president of the Susquehan- 


Gilmour. 


na Division of the Penn- 


Gilmour noted that the 


sylvania Power and Light 


Foundation was founded in 


Co., Montovirsville. 


1981 as a "non-profit, fiscal- 


Other members listed 


ly and legally independent 


Other members include 


orgaruzation working on 


George V. Cohen, attorney. 


behalf of the College". 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 23 




Make a Date 

with 

Macbeth 

March 18... Academic Center Auditorium 



24 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

Students discover 
'valuable experiences' 
in health programs 



[This article was written 
and submitted just as the 
semesters changed. It has 
inadvertantly been delayed. 
We thank the writer for her 
submission and welcome 
similar submissions by 
other students in other pro- 
grams. The Editors.) 
By Michelle L. Orwig, 
secondary student 
in health occupations, 
from Watsontown 



It used to be that secon- 
dary vocational health oc- 
cupation students were 
channelled into nursing 
programs, but that isn't the 
case anymore. Since 1983, 
students are pursuing 
careers in dental assisting, 
physical therapy, occupa- 
tional therapy, surgical 
technology, and home 
health care. 

Opportunities to select 

Opportunities to select 
clinical placement are based 
on individual interests and 
career goals. 

In the first year at the 
Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College secondary 
vocational health occupa- 
tions program, students 
learn about the human 
body in health and disease. 

Clinical training is pro- 
vided at Divine Providence 
Hospital and the Leader 
Nmsing and Rehabilitation 
Center South, in 
Williamsport. 

All students receive pa- 
tient care assignments and 
observe hospital depart- 
ments such as x-ray, 
physical therapy, occupa- 
tional therapy, pharmacy 
and cardiac rehabilitation. 



Dental assisting, too 

During the students' se- 
cond year, they also receive 
training in dental assisting 
by a College dental hygiene 
instructor. 

Many students find that 
an "observation" is simply 
not enough exposure to 
decide on a career; so, dur- 
ing their senior year at the 
vocational-technical school, 
each student is given the 
chance to gain more 
"hands-on" experience by 
selecting an additional 
clinical site. 
Placements vary 

Most students choose a 
location closer to home. 
Placements vary according 
to individual interest. 

Rebecca A. Griffith, a 
Williamsport student, is 
working at the American 
Red Cross. This gives her 
the opportunity to develop 
a better understanding of 
the skills required to work 
at a public health agency. 

Deana M. Suit, a 
Millville students, is a 
volunteer at Geisinger 
Medical Center, working in 
the operating room and 
laboratory. She feels her ex- 
perience at Geisinger will 
better her for a nursing 
career. Miss Suit plans to 
take advantage of the ad- 
vanced placement oppor- 
tunity at the College. 



Some go to hospitals 

Some students elect to 
work in a hospital depart- 
ment. Melanie R. Confer 
volunteered for two 
semesters in the physical 
therapy department in the 
Jersey Shore Hospital. She 
hopes this experience will 
help her in paramedic train- 
ing after graduation. 

Students planning to 
pursue careers in dental 
assisting include: Diane M. ' 
Englert from Jersey Shore 
and Jenean Robbins of War- 
rior Run. Both plan to 
become certified dental 
assistants by eiuoUing in 
the dental assisting course 
offered at the College. 

This Fall, with the sup- 
port of Dr. Richard A. Beat- 
ty in Jersey Shore and Dr. 
Timothy Dutrow in Milton, 
they will be given the op- 
portunity to gain on-the-job 
experience prior to 
graduation. 

Occasionally, a student 
may decide he or she en- 
joys working with children 
in a school setting. This is 
the case with Paula A. 
Eberline, currently 
volunteering as a teacher's 
aide in Sullivan County 
Elementary School. 

Please turn to Page 24 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 25 



Employment Opportunities 

IThe information which follows is provided by the College Placement Center. Inquiries should 
be directed to that office which is in the Learning Resources Center.! 



BMY, P. O. Box 1512, York, Pa. 17405... has an opening for a technical il- 
lustrator (spring graduate) B\fY is a manufacturer of armored track vehicles and 
needs an illustrator to keep technical manuals updated. Send a resume to pat 
Schneider, employment interviewer. 

Lycoming Silica Sand Co., P.O. Box 159, Montoursville, Pa. 17754... has an 
opening for a permanent, full-time accounts receivable clerk beginning in April. $800 
to $1,000 a month, full benefits. Would consider a student who attends evening 
classes and will help with tuition. Send a resume to Jack Brennen, controller. (Could 
be used for Co-Op.) 

American Breeders Association, R.D. 1, Box 346E, New Columbia, Pa. 
17856... would like resumes from May graduates in ACB, BM with an agriculture 
background, or DY for an independent sales representative. Send resume to William 
Flick. 

Semmel Excavating, Inc., 3712 Hamilton Blvd., Allentown, Pa. 
18103-4598... would like resumes from S&O graduates to operate backhoes, pans, 
dozers, loaders, grad-alls, trucks, and other related equipment. Wants career 
oriented people who are willing to learn the business from the ground up. Send 
resume to Keith E. Malcolm, president. 







Legani-Hanne Chapter of Sweet Adelines, under the direction of Sally Smith, of 
Williamsport, will perform music in four-part harmony at 7:30 p.m. on April 5 as 
part of the Local Artists Series at the College. This local chapter of the Sweet 
Adelines is one of 740 chapters in the United States. [Courtesy photo} 



Definition of Vandaiism: 

Doilaricide. 



26 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 



One more week left 
to enter nominations 
for teaching awards 



Only one more week re- 
mains for those who wish 
to nominate an instructor 
for a Distinguished 
Teaching Award. 

Nominations must be 
submitted to Executive Of- 
fices Room 200, second 
floor, Lifelong Education 
Center, by next Monday, 
March 10, to qualify. 

As of last Tuesday, only 
five nominations had been 
received, according to Mrs. 
Beatrice E. Milliard, 
secretary to the executive 
assistant for internal affairs 
(Dr. Robert G. Bowers). 

Of those five, Mrs. 
Milliard said, four were sub- 
mitted by students, and one 
was submitted by a College 
APT staff employee. 
Anyone may nominate 

Dr. Bowers stated that 
he would encourage anyone 
who is knowledgeable 
about an instructor's 
teaching abilities to 
nominate that person in an 
effort to "show apprecia- 
tion... for making a dif- 
ference in their life". 

Me added that anyone 
(student, staff, faculty, 
alumni) may nominate an 
instructor who has taught 
at the College for at least 
one year on a full-time basis. 



Committee reviews 

According to Dr. 
Bowers, each nomination 
will be reviewed and selec- 
tions will be made by a 
committee comprised of: 

Dr. Bowers, as chairper- 
son; Dr. James E. Mid- 
dleton, dean of academic af- 
fairs; a student body 
representative (to be 
selected or appointed by 
the Student Govenunent 
Association), and a Board of 
Trustees representative, 
whose name will be an- 
nounced later. 

Also on the committee 
will be the three immediate 
past recipients of the 
Master Teacher Award who 
are Lamont E. Butters, 
associate professor of civil 
technology; Dr. Daniel J. 
Doyle, professor of govern- 
ment, history, sociology 
and philosophy (now direc- 
tor of the Integrated Studies 
Division), and Dr. Peter B. 
Diunaius, professor of 
English. 
Awards detailed 

Dr. Bowers emphasized 
that in addition to recogru- 
tion at May commence- 
ment, individual plaques, 
and publication in the Presi- 
dent's Armual Report, each 
award recipient will receive 



a monetary award as well. 

Those instructors who 
receive the Excellence in 
Teaching Award will receive 
$500 each and the instructor 
who is awarded the Master 
Teacher Award will receive 
$1,000. 

Recipients names will 
also be permanently 
displayed on a plaque in 
the Leanung Resources 
Center. 

Dr. Bowers said he is 
reminding individuals that 
the nonunating process is 
easier this year and that for 
those who still experience 
difficulty with the nomina- 
tion form, assistance is 
available in the Tutoring 
Center, LRC. 

Nomination forms and 
information booklets 
are available at any one of 
the following locations: 

The Tutoring Center, 
LRC; the College Informa- 
tion Office, second floor, 
LEC; the Financial Aid Of- 
fice, second floor, ACC; the 
Student Government 
Association Office, LEC; at 
the North Campus, and at 
the Natural Resources 
Management Campus. The 
packet is also available in 
the Executive Offices, Room 
200, second floor, LEC. 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 27 



Special help available 
to students who live 
in disaster areas: 
See Financial Aid Office 

By Donald S. Shade, financial aid director 

lite federal government has announced plans to aid 
students living in federally-declared natural disaster 
areas in Pennsylvania. 

Those students living in these areas vifill be allovkred 
to file Pell Special Condition Forms basing their grant 
on 1985 income information rather than 1984 income 
information. 

Special Condition Forms for Pell may be filed if the 
parents of a dependent student or the independent stu- 
dent and spouse lived in a federally-declared natural 
disaster area and were unable to earn income in the 
usual way during 1985 as a result of the disaster. 

Those counties which the federal govertunent is con- 
sidering federally-declared natural disaster areas are: 

Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Carbon, Clearfield, 
Crawford, Erie, Fayette, Forest, Greene, Lackawanna, 
Luzerne, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Northumberland, 
Somerset, Susquehanna, Union, Venago, Warren, 
Washington, Wayne, Westmoreland and Wyoming. 

Students who wish to file a Special Condition Form 
with Pell based on the information provided above 
should contact the Financial Aid Office, Room 201, 
Academic Center. 



BARRY'S 

Brooklyn Style Eatery 

2 34 Park St., Williamsport 

323-FOOD{3663) 




Dpen 8 a m to midnight 

Monday thru Friday 

Saturday 2 p.m. to 3 a.m. 



Just across from the new east parking lot 

NEW -FREE -FREE -NEW 
DELIVERY SERVICE 

From n :00 to 11 ;00 Monday thru Friday 

Saturday 4 to 11 p.m. 

S4.00 Minimum Order for Delivery 

Limited Delivery Area 

Spe 



Gel a 1 liter 133.8 oz.l for 50c 

your choice R.C. Cola, 

Cherry R.C. Dr. Pepper or Crush 

All this al Barry's 
here we sell no burger before it'! 
OH — by the way 



New course 
in Russian 
history 
offered 



In conjunction with the 
recent NBC-TV miniseries 
about "Peter the Great" as 
well as in consideration of 
the fact that over 4 million 
Russian students are 
presently studying 
American culture while only 
25,000 American students 
are studying Russian 
culture, an eight-week, 
three-credit course in Rus- 
sian Civilization is being of- 
fered through the In- 
tegrated Studies Division. 

The course will begin 
next Tuesday, March 11 
and will continue through 
April 29. The instructor is 
Dr. Thomas J. E. Walker, 
associate professor of 
history, government, and 
sociology. 

The course will meet ^ 
from 6 to 9 p.m. on Mon- /■ 
days and Tuesdays. : 

Dr. Walker, who holds 
a degree in Russian political ■ 
hisotry, will survey the I, 
geography and history of ''. 
the Kievan state, Moscovy, jj 
the "Mongol Yoke", and j! 
Imperial Russia as an in- J; 
troduction to a systematic ; 
study of the Revolutions of 
1917, the CivU War, and the 
development of Soviet 
political, economic and ^ 

social institutions and -^ 

foreign policy from the 
Bolshevik Revolution to the 
present. 

Students may register 
for the course through their 
advisers or in the Integrated 
Studies Division Office, 
Room 211, Academic 
Center. 



28 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 




Daffodil sale to benefit 
Cancer Society 

College Activities Office Personnel will be taking 
orders for daffodils in the Rec Center office until this 
Friday, March 7, according to Ms. Sandra Rhone, Col- 
lege activihes assistant. 

Flowers are $3 a bunch (10 flowers). Individual bun- 
ches will be sold on Friday, March 14. 

Money will be collected on Thursday, March 13, and 
flowers will be delivered the next day, Ms. Rhone 
added. 

Interested students, faculty and staff may call Ext. 
763 or contact a College activities person, she said. 

The sale benefits the American Cancer Society. 



Microcomputer 
ordered 
for Tutoring 
Center 

The Tutoring Center in 
the Learning Resources 
Center has ordered a new 
microcomputer and is in the 
■ process of selecting soft- 
ware, according to Mrs. 
Diana Kuhns, coordinator 
of tutoring. 

The microcomputer is 
due to arrive sometime in 
March and will be installed 
at the rear of the Tutoring 
Center. The computer is for 
the use of developmental 
studies math and English 
students and will be 
available while the Tutoring 
Center is open: Monday 
through Thursday, 8 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. and Friday, 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m. 

The microcomputer was 
funded by a Vocational 
Education Disadvantage 
Grant. 




Deadline Set For 
Pennsylvania's 
Perfect Teen 
Entrants 

Pageant Officials 
announced Marcfi 8th, 1986, 
as tine deadline for 
applications to the 1986 
Pennsylvania's Perfect Teen 
Pageant to be staged this 
year for the first time in 
Monroeville, Pennsylvania, 
in the Grand Ballroom of 
the High Rise Howard 
Johnson's Hotel on April 
18, 19, and 20, 1986. The 
Pennsylvania's Perfect Teen 
pageant is an official 
America's Perfect Teen 
Contest. 

There is "no 
performing talent" 
requirement, all judging is 
on the basis of poise, 
personality, and beauty of 
face and figure. Entrants 
who qualify must be 
between 14 and 19 years cf 
age and never married. All 
girls interested in 
competing for the title must 
write to: Pennsylvania's 
Perfect Teen Pageant, 
Regional Headquarters, 347 
Locust Avenue, 
Washington, PA 15301 by 
March 8th. Letters must 
include a recent snapshot, a 
brief biography, and a 
phone number. 

The new Pennsylvania's 
Perfect Teen will recieve a 
$1,000 cash scholarship 
among her many prizes. 
She will receive an all- 
expense paid trip to Myrtle 
Beach, South Carolina, the 
sight of the national 
America's Perfect Teen 
pageant. 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 29 



The 

SPOTLIGHTing 
series will 

return 
March 10. 




In our 
neighborhood 

Firemen rushed to 1028 W. Third St. last Monday moi^ 
ning when smoke was filling the structure. Fire of- 
ficials at first considered the smoke "may have been 
caused by a clogged flue pipe" but later found a pro- 
blem with a furnace. {SPOTLIGHT photo] 

■■■■VALUABLE COUPON """I 

FREE PIZZA 

Buy any size Little Caesan 

Original round pizza at regular 

price, get the identical pizza GOLDEN STRIP 

FREE with this coupon. GIANT PLAZA 



327-8600 






itndeali mtc 
10% only wilk 
itndcBl I.D. ud lUi id. 



One coQpon per CDitomer. Cirr; oqI onl;. 
Al pirtlclpiling locilions. 



© I9IJ LilUt Ckw EoUTpfiia, Int. 



SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

College participates in survey; 
results reveal student facts 

By Kathy L. Cobb, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Last semester, the College participated in the National Freshman Survey, spon- 
sored by the American Council on Education and by UCLA. The survey measures 
the characteristics and attitudes of coUege freshmen across the United States. 

According to Dr. William J. Martin, dean of student services, approximately 900 
first-semester students of the CoUege responded in the survey during FaU 1985. 
Dean provides statistics 

"It is in the College's best interest to know as much as possible about our 
students -- who are really our consumers, " Dean Martin said, adding, "Having such 
knowledge enables us to prepare advertising which will better serve, attract, and 
hold students to the College." 

Dr. Martin provided statistics which indicate specific information concerning 
students at the College: 

~ 26.6 percent of students entering the College plan to obtain a bachelor's 
degree. 

- 89.8 percent of the students surveyed attend college because they want to get 
a better job. 

- When asked why they chose to attend this CoUege, 55.5 percent said 
"because our graduates get good jobs"; 18.3 percent said they preferred to live near 
home; 25 percent stated that the CoUege's low tuition influenced their choices; 29 
percent chose the College because of its special education programs, and 39.6 per- 
cent based their decisions on the College's "good academic reputation". 

- 44.9 percent stated that waiting in long lines (i.e., bookstore, meal plans, ID 
validation, schedule changes) was among the major problems they encountered 
when first attending the CoUege; 25 percent indicated problems with class content. 

- 24 percent said their home was 50 to 100 miles from the CoUege; 24 percent 
stated their home was between 100 and 500 mUes away. 

- "Only 15.6 percent of our students reported their age over 21". 
Information on a national level 

Dr. Martin also provided information which compares the CoUege's first- 
semester students to other freshmen on a national level: 

- Concerning political orientation, 67.7 percent of our students say they are 
"middle-of-the-road", while 56.7 percent of students on a national level make the 
same claim. 

- 77 percent of our students say they are concerned about air pollution while 78 
percent of students on a national level make the same claim. 

~ 49.8 percent of our students beUeve abortion should be legalized whUe 54.9 
percent on a national level share the same belief. 

- 33.6 percent of our students believe women should be confined to the home, 
whereas 22 percent believe the same nationally. (Of the responses from this CoUege, 
40 percent of those who replied were male and 17 percent were female.) 

- 84 percent of our students belive in equality for women while 91 percent 
beUeve the same, nationaUy. 

- 67.7 percent of our students believe homosexuaUty should be prohibited, 
whereas 47.9 percent believe the same, nationaUy. 

Probably do it again 

According to Dr. Martin, the figures represent only a smaU percentage of ques- • 
tions asked and responded to. Currently, Dr. Martin, Dr. J;;. ,ife Fraser, dean of 
educational research, and Dr. Miles Williams, dean of employee and community 
relations, are interpreting the information to make it useful for advertising and ser- 
vice purposes, the dean said. 

"We were delighted that we were able to participate in this survey... We wUl 
probably do it again next year," Dr. Martin stated. 



Q.W.A.C.C. 



MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 31 

Artwork by Arthur L Straub 
Concept by Kathy L Cobb 
Both of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 




QuiCt^,- . &ET /^ SHOT 



/ THINKTHt ^fiNDAL IS 

THs O'Vea.... MO, iTsrne Cfuy 

IH TUS CAP... f^Ay&e ... 



Students discover 
'valuable experiences' 
in health programs 



Continued from Page 24 
They're pleased 

Miss Eberline is im- 
plementing a nutrition 
education program. She en- 
joys teaching health lessons 
to the elementary school 
children and observing 
growth and development 
characteristics. 

In addition to volunteer 
clinical placements, the 
health occupations students 



have the option of obtain- 
ing employment through 
the College Co-Op 
programs. 

Tracy L. Conner, from 
Jersey Shore, is taking ad- 
vantage of this opportunity. 
She is employed as a nurs- 
ing assistant at the Sus- 
queView Nursing Home in 
Lock Haven. Miss Conner 
is applying to the practical 
nursing program at the Col- 



lege and says she is grateful 
for the opportunity to help 
finance her education 
through her Co-Op work 
experience. 

Overall, the health oc- 
cupations students are 
pleased to work toward 
their career goals. Several 
will be entering the work 
force after graduation; 
others will be continuing 
their education at the 
College. 



32 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1986 

Bulletin Board 

Monday, March 3 through Sunday, March 9 
Movie 

"Terms of Endearment", and "Eddie and the Cruisers", 7 to 11 
p.m., tonight. Academic Center Auditorium (ACC). Admission free to 
students, Acuity, and staff with College ID. $1 admission for the 
general public. Sponsored by the Student Government Association 
(SGA). 

MEETINGS 

Student Government Association... executive, 4 p.m., tomorrow, 
Tuesday, March 4, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center (LEC). 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 4, Room 
329, Academic Center. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship...? p.m., this Wednesday, March 5, Room 
218, Academic Center. 

Student Government Association... senate, 5 p.m., tomorrow, Tues- 
day, March 4, Room B107, LEC 

Student American Dental Hygiene Association... 12 to 12:30 p.m.. 
Room 407, Academic Center. 

ACTIVITIES 

Poe in Person... 8 p.m., this Satiwday, March 8, in the Academic 
Center Auditorium; tne performance is part of the performing artist 
series, sponsored by local businesses; $3 general aamission, group rate 
$1.50, free to students, faculty, and staff with validated ID. For ticket 
information and resevations call 327-4763. Students, facuty, and staff 
can pick up one free ticket with ID at the Recreation Center, Room 
A137, Lifelong Education Center (LEC). 

Hoagie Sale... Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA), 11 
a.m. to 12 noon, this Wednesday, March 5, Susquehanna Room 
Lobby. 

Bus Trip... to Reading clothing outlets, this Saturday, March 8. Bus 
leaves Learning Resources Center bus loop at 6:30 a.m. 

RoIIerskating... 8 p.m., this Thursday, March 6, at Skating Plus. 
Free admision with College ID. $2 admission to the general public. 
Skate rentals are 75 cents extra. Sponsored by the College Activities 
Office. 



Over 200 attend WWAS dance 

Photo, Page One 

WWAS, the College's student-operated radio station, staged and sponsored a 
dance last Wednesday. The dance attracted more than 200 persons ~ which was 
"higher than anticipated", according to Brian J. Hill, broadcasting student from 
Montgomery and the station's operations manager. 

James E. Mothersbaugh, broadcasting student from Muncy, and Denise A. 
Bonomo (who is Denise Martin on the air), a broadcasting student from Pitman, 
were deejays for the event. Joseph Dalto, an employee of WILQ, Williamsport, pro- 
vided a light and sound system. 



s3MHoav 



oo>"^ 



» «? f 

O «0 I 

I-( 01 ' 



'^ff^.^Jb'i 




SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 

■ 

Board presents plaque 
to Mrs. Eiseman 

Last Monday evening, the College Board of 
Trustees presented Mrs. Sarah Eiseman, widow of 
Louis S. Eiseman, a College trustee, with a plaque 
commemorating his service to the College. 

The presentation, made by Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder, College president, consisted of a photo, 
nameplate, and additional engraved information. 

At the meeting. Dr. Breuder staled, "This is 
just one more small way to express what the Col- 
lege feels about his contributions... his outstanding 
vears tif service to this institution." 



Intramural sports listed 



Intramural sports for this 
week vary in activty. The 
following sports and ac- 
tivities are offered according 
to Ms. Margot R. Bayer, 
evening College activities 
assistant: 

Tournament 

A pool and dart tournament 
will be held 6 to 10 p.m., 
next Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, March 18 and 19. Sign 
up in the Recreation 
Center, Room A137, 
Lifelong Education Center. 
There is a $3 registration 
fee. 

Soccer and softball 

Anyone interested in play- 
ing Softball or soccer should 
hove their rosters in by this 
Friday, March 14. 

Basketball 

On this Thursday, March 
13, there will be no 
basketball. 



Volleyball, 
basketball 

Volleyball and basketball 
playoffs will begin today, 
March 10. The tournament 
will be double elimination. 
A no show will result in a 
loss. 

Women's weight 
training 

A women's weight training 
clinic will be held tomor- 
row, Tuesday, March 11. 
All faculty and staff are en- 
couraged to participate, Ms. 
Bayer said. 



A basketball game 
lA/ill be played between 
Phi Beta Lambda 
members and the Col- 
lege alumni this Thurs- 
day at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Bardo Gymnasium. 
Spectators welcome. 



On the Cover 
Upper photo: ID Your Kid. See Page 8. 
Lower photo: Instructing students in CPR (car- 
diopulmonary resuscitation) is Harry Specht, assistant 
professor of physical education. Students are Mike 
Giulano, human services, and Terri Gibson, also a 
human services student. (SPOTLIGHT Photo by Donald S. 
eoye, of the SPOTLIGHT staff.) 



SPOTLIGHT 



The SPOTLIGHT is published 
weekly on Monday mornings 
except for official College vaca- 
tions by interested students. 
Opinions expressed are those 
of the staff as a whole or of in- 
dividual writers and/con- 
tributors and do not reflect of- 
ficial institutional opinion. 
Office is in Room 7, Base- 
ment, Academic Center. 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761, 
'^ Ext. 221. 



STAFF 
Wanna F. Brown 
Managing Editor 

Cynthia E. A. Hartranft 
Advertising Director 

Kathy L. Cobb 

Administrative Affairs Editor 

and Editorial Page Editor 

Sandra L. Musgrave 

Bureau Chief 

Academic Center 

LeRoy S. Whitmire Ir. 
Photography Editor 



Susan R. Kallansrud 

Bureau Chief 

Building Trades Center 

Catherine A. Hannon 

Bureau Chief 

Learning Resources Center 

joe! I. Mader 

Bureau Chief 

Main Campus/Westside 

and Sports Reporter 

Donna L. Trimble 

Staff Associate 

and Photographer 



and PMT Techn: 



STAFF ASSISTANTS 

Lisa E. Secrisl, Russel J. 

Phillips, 

William J. Weatherwax, 

Donald S. Foye, 

Rose DiNardo, lames K. 

Morrissey, 

Marge DiNardo, Diana C. 

VanFIeel. 



MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 3 



Awards made 


from four new 1 


scholarship programs 1 


The College has made awards 


have been invested, he noted, and the 


from four new scholarship programs, 


accrued interest is being used to 


according to Donald S. Shade, direc- 


award the scholarships. 


tor of financial aid. 


Criteria for each of the awards is 


These programs, he said, have 


academic achievement, leadership. 


been established with the 


dedication to the program of study. 


Williamsport Area Commuiuty College 


and financial need. 


Foundation. The initial contributions 




Sarah Lundgren 


Kenneth E. Morgan 


The Dr. Henry G. Hager Jr. 


The Louis E. Miele Sr. Memorial 


Memorial Scholarship of $300 was 


Scholarship of $200 was established 


established by Mrs. Hager, 1550 James 


by David Miele, owner of the Hillside 


Road, Williamsport, in memory of her 


Restaurant, in memory of his father. 


husband. 


The award goes to an outstanding 


The award goes to the outstan- 


food and hospitality student. 


ding surgical technology student. 


Selected as the recipient was Ken- 


The first recipient is Sarah Lun- 


neth E. Morgan, of Box 17, R.D. 2, 


dgren, of 953 Louisa St., 


Hegins. 


Williamsport. 






James A. Zimmerman 




Michael G. Blankley 




The Valley Farms Scholarship (two 


Thomas Van Sant 


awards of $500 each) was established 


The John A. Savoy Scholarship of 


"out of the generosity of Valley 


$300 was estabUshed "out of the 


Farms, Williamsport," the director 


generosity of Mr. Savoy and his fami- 


said. 


ly, friends, and employees," the 


The award goes to the outstan- 


director said. 


ding student in the agribusiness pro- 


The award goes to the outstan- 


gram and in the dairy management 


ding electronics technology student. 


program. 


Selected as the recipient was 


Selected as recipients were James 


Thomas Van Sant, of 451 Market St., 


A. Zimmerman, of Box 92, R.D. 2, 


South Williamsport. 


Benton, for agribusiness, and Michael 




G. Blankley, of Box 172, Star Route 4, 




Everett, for dairy management. 



4 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 

Textbook delays, high costs 
cause problems for all 

SPOTLIGHT commentary 

With midterm examinations upon us, students and instructors are experien- 
cing added compiications because of delays in stiipping and of higti costs of 
textbool(s. 

Book delays of two to five weeks -- some books were not in last week - 
present a hardship to students and instructors alike. Following a course syllabi, 
affected students will have several weeks of reading to catch up on; instructors 
will have to adjust their classes and examinations to the situation. 

In one case, the text, "Advertising" by William Bolen (John Wiley & Sons, 
publisher) was delayed because, the publisher said, their computers were con- 
fusing orders. 

Books in the first shipment (a partial shipment) sold at $36.55 in the Col- 
lege Bookstore, but books in the next shipment in mid-February cost $37.60. 
Why the increase? 

Mrs. Eleonore R. Holcomb, Bookstore supervisor, said, "The College 
Bookstore goes by the publishing company's price." Asked about the price in- 
crease in the last shipment of that text, Mrs. Holcomb said the publishing com- 
panies make a statement with their book lists that prices are subject to change 
without notice. 

Another delay Involved the textbook, "These United States: The Questions 
of Our Past", second edition, by Irwin Unger (Little Brown and Company, 
publishers). The first shipment was the wrong volume and came in during the 
fifth week of classes. The correct volume came in near the end of February. 
The Bookstore supervisor said the volume error was the publisher's error. 

At the campus Bookstore, the book was priced at $21.60; at Lycoming Col- 
lege, it was priced at $19.95. 

Among other "late books" was "The World Since 1500: A Global History", 
fourth edition, by Leften Stavros Stavrianos (Prentice Hall Inc., publisher), which 
sold for $22.60 on campus and $21.95 at Lycoming; "Residential Treatment", a 
booklet, supplement to a text which wasn't in last week and wasn't listed at 
Lycoming; "You are Speaking, Who is Listening?", by Ferguson and Miller 
(Science Research Associates, publishers), which is $9.90 on campus and 
$12.95 new at LyComlng. 

As far as prices go, a Book Nook spokesperson said that store could get 
books at the same prices as Lycoming if 10 or more are ordered at the same 
time. Barbara Jordon, manager at Waiden's Bookstore, said textbooks go at the 
retail price for students, but institution orders get a 20 percent discount for 
books priced $25 or more. 

Interestingly, the textbook, "This is PR: The Realities of Public Relations", 
by Newsom and Scott (Wadsworth), is listed at $30.90 at the College Bookstore, 
but at $40 at Lycoming. Mrs. Betty Beck, manager there, said the book's price 
is high because it Is a new edition. 

The campus Bookstore supervisor said she encourages instructors to keep 
the same books in order to buy books used and so bring about a savings for 
all. 

Instructors say they must order books "early" and so expect to have the 
textbooks when the semester starts. 

Students deserve, with midterm examinations upon us, some type of dis- 
count and some cooperative attention to this problem. 

Meanwhile, until the problem is resolved, students might think about 
checking around before making a purchase. 



General 
Services crew 
commended 
for jobs well 
done 

SPOTLIGHT Commentary 

How many of us take for 
granted the conditions of our 
sidettialks and parking lots 
during the winter lime here at 
the College? 

General Seroices is 
responsible for this very speedy 
removal of snow. They 
contract a company to come in 
and plow the parking lots. 
This IS always done by the 
lime the College begins classes. 

They also have a ground 
crew of two men to shovel the 
sidewalks. This, too, is always 
done quickly. 

We should be proud of our 
General Services crew who do 
such a fantastic job. The crew 
consists of grounds crew, two 
men; custodial, 26 people: 
building maintenance, 33 
people: healing, cooling, and 
plumbing, 13 people: and 
security, 5. 



UA V.I.P. 

MOVIE 

TICKETS 

$2.50 to students 

with validated I.D. 

Sponsored by SGA 

Available in Rec 

Center office 
Room A137 (LEC) 



MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 5 



Trustees 
approve 
alcohol 
guidelines 

The College Board of 
Trustees approved a recom- 
mendation to amend and 
adopt a College policy on 
the serving of alcoholic 
beverages as it met last 
week in regular session. 

According to the newly 
adopted policy, the "serv- 
ing of alcoholic beverages 
by staff or students of the 
College at functions held at 
the College is prohibited ex- 
cept for College sponsored 
functions specifically ap- 
proved, in writing, by the 
president". 

This policy received yes 
votes from all the board 
members except Trustee W, 
, Jack Lewis who voted 
against it, saying, "I don't 
think (alcoholic beverages] 
should be served at all." 

An addition to the 
policy is an amendment 
which states the "serving of 
alcoholic beverages by Col- 
lege staff or students at off- 
campus, non-College events 
catered under the auspices 
of the College's Food and 
Hospitality/Culinary Arts 
programs is prohibited". 
This amendment was 
unanimously approved. 

According to Dr. Robert 
L. Breuder, College policy 
on the serving of alcoholic 
beverages has always ex- 
isted in reference to student 
consumption of alcohol at 
non-student College func- 
tions, but it was necessary 
to set guidelines as set up 
in the newly-approved 
amendments. 



Bluegrass 
Festival 
on April 22 

The Bluegrass Festival - 
becoming a traditional event 
at the College ~ this year 
will be held at 7:30 p.m., 
Tuesday, April 22 in the 
Susquehanna Room. The 
festival is part of the Special 
Events schedule for the 
Spring, according to Mrs. 
Jo Ann R. Frenuotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

The festival will feature 
groups such as 
Buckdancer's Choice, the 
Bluegrass Foure, the Four 
Flying Feet doggers. Dia- 
mond Back Rattlers, and 
the North Fork Alliance. 

Four Flying Feet dog- 
gers is an Applachian clogg- 
ing team from Pittsburgh 
and is -comprised of Nancy 
Dwyer and John Patrick. 
Diamondback ■ Rat- 
tlers, a bluegrass band since 
late 1976, has performed in 
Ontario, Canada, and cur- 
rently is working on 
another album at the 
Revonah Studios in Liberty, 
N.Y. 

The Bluegrass Foure's 
instrumentation is strictly 
accoustical with five string 
banjo, mandolin, guitar, 
and bass fiddle. 

Students, faculty, and 
staff with College ID will be 
admitted free. There is a $2 
general admission. There 
are no advance ticket sales. 

Additional information 
is available in the Recrea- 
tion Center Office, Room 
A137, Lifelong Education 
Center, or by calling Col- 
lege Ext. 763 or 327^763. 



6 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 



Bloodmobile visit to be 

Thursday, to return next week; 

all blood types needed 



The American Red 
Cross/Student Govern- 
ment Association spon- 
sored Bloodmobile will 
be accepting donations 
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
this Thursday, March 13, 
at the Natural Resources 
Management Center in 
AUenwood. 

Mrs. Janet R. 
Querimit, R.N., College 
nurse, noted that the 
goal this year is 45 pints. 
"All blood types are 
needed because the local 
blood banks are low," 
she said. 
Visit next week, too 

Next week, the 
Bloodmobile will be at 
the Main Campus from 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on 
Tuesday, March 18 and 
Wednesday, March 19, in 
the Bardo Gymnasium. 



The donation area 
will be clearly 
designated, Mrs. 
Querimit said. 

Sign-up sheets are 
available for those per- 
sor« who wish to make 
an appointment to 
donate blood during the 
Bloodmobile's visit. 

The sheets may be 
picked up between 8 
a.m. and 3:30 p.m. daily 
in Room 104, Bardo 
Gymnasium. 
Goal is 480 pints 

"1 expect a large tur- 
nout for the Bloodmobile 
— which means that peo- 
ple with busy schedules 
may like to go directly to 
the front of the blood 
donor line," the nurse 
said, adding, "Using a 
sign-up sheet to make an 
appointment enables a 



donor to do this." 

A goal of 480 pints is 
projected for the Blood- 
mobile's two-day visit to 
the Main Campus. 

Students to help 
with Bloodmobile 

The advanced medical 
secretarial class will be 
helping with the Blood- 
mobile visit which will be 
held next Tuesday and 
Wednesday, March 18 and 
19, according to Mrs. Bon- 
nie R. Taylor, associate pro- 
fessor of business 
administration. 

They will assist with 
serving sandwiches, serving 
students, walking students, 
typing, taking temperatures^, 
and taking blood pressures. 



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FREE PIZZA 



327-8600 



Buy any size Little Caesars 

Original round pizza at reguiar 

price, get tlie identical pizza GOLDEN STRIP 

FREE with tliis coupon. GIANT PLAZA 






A.C.C. ilvdento nre 
idditioDil 10% ODlr with 
itndeni I.D. ind this id. 



One cogpoo per coiloaer. Cirr; OBt oal;. 
Al pirtidpilliig locidoDi. 

© 1985 UlUt Clou EonrpriiH, Ik. 



Placement 
services 
to be offered 
tomorrow, 
Wednesday 

Tomorrow and Wednes- 
day, Placement Office per- 
sonnel will offer services to 
students about to graduate. 

At 2 p.m. each day, 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., 
director of advisement and 
career services will be in the 
Academic Center 
Auditorium to collect infor- 
mation cards which are us- 
ed as source cards after 
students are graduated. 



MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 7 



Open House on Sunday: 
'Discover the Difference' 

The College's 1986 Open House will be held from noon to 4:30 p.m. this 
coming Sunday, March 16. This year's Open House theme is "Discover the 
Difference". 

According to Dr. Miles Williams, dean of employee and community rela- 
tions, over 10,000 persons are expected to participate in this year's activities. 

Various College divisions and student organizations will take part, offering 
hands-on experience with computer terminals, as well as displays, student- 
guided tours, and various other activities. 

At the Natural Resources Management Campus, AUenwood, there will be 
offered a rodeo, a woodsmen's competition, and a cow-milking contest. 

On Main Campus, visitors will be given the chance to view the latest in 
state-of-the-art instructional equipment and to see the Advanced Technology 
and Health Sciences Center now under construction. 

Dr. Williams said that the Susquehanna Room will offer a special, holiday-type 
menu, and students in the food services curriculums will serve food on a 
demonstration basis. 

Refreshments will also be available from various groups and organizations 
which are participating that day. 



STUDENT 
HOUSING 

Foniished Rooms 

Singtei, Doobles, 

Apartments iTailable 

ALLUTILmES 
INCLUDED 

Showcn and kitchen 
facilities 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine Ave. 

and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 

Botli witliin one [1] 

block of WACC 

Phone 326-6536 




ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIGHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Snacks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 



BENSON 




€Ifil mini. ^ 
g9Mn market 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



8 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 




I.D 

YOL 

KIC 

AHU 

SUCC 

Story and picture 
By Donna L. Trii 
Of the SPOTLIG 
"The I.D. Y 
fort was a huge 
said Davie Jane 
division director 
Services. 
She said the efft 
"families from a 
as Selinsgrove." 
Sixty-eight child 
processed and 4 
for the microdot 
information. 

Front page p 
' the left: behind 
Susan Wajda, Pi 
faculty, dental h 
Laurie Seachrist, 
and Debbie Clai 
both dental hygi 
students, are int 
Mary Walter anc 
daughter, Daniel 
Williamsport. 

Javette O. Tl 
dental hygiene, i 
picture two maki 
with Danielle to 
what she can ex] 
goes around the 
stations. 

In picture thi 
Patti Schon, a pr 
sing student fron 
Loyalsock, is she 
measuring Danie 
to add to her por 

Trooper Robe 
of the Pensylvani 
Police, in picture 
shown fingerprin 
Armanda, of Sou 
Williamsport, wh 
father, Larry Am 
looks on. 

P-PA( 



MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 9 





10 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 

We do 
windows... 
and walk miles 
to do the job 

Photos and text 

By Donna L. Trimble 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Ever wonder how the 
Academic Center gets so 
clean? 

As an investigative -- or 
is that just inijuisitive - 
reporter for The 
SPOTLIOHT, I decided to 
checl<. 

I found out that it's not 
really elves... but it is a 
group that's just as busy! 

Robert Stepp, of 
Williamsport -- better 
known as Bobby -- and his 
crew of helpers are busy 
scurrying all over the 
hallways, stairways and of- 
fices getting things back in 
shape for a new day. 

Stepp has been here for 
seven years now, joining 
the workforce as a youth 
with the STEP program. He 
started out on the dayshift 
as a delivery person and 
then moved to General Ser- 
vices and was assigned to 
clean the dental clinic on 
the fourth floor of the 
Academic Center. 

Now, at 24, he's the 
supervisor of a work study 
crew in custodial 
maintenance. 

Stepp has three work 
study helpers who are 
directly within his 
responsibility. 

They are James K. 
Black, of Westover; Robert 
W. Fleck, of Duncansville, 
and Patrick I. Leonard, of 
Troupsburg, N.Y. 

They are all students in 
the service and operation of 



Patrick t. Leonard 




Keeping the offices clean 





Robert W. Fleck 



MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 11 

heavy equipment program 
based at the Natural 
Resources Management 
Center/Campus at 
Allen wood. 

Each of them puts in an 
average of 15 to 20 hours a 
week - and they are very 
busy hours what with 
dusting, mopping, sham- 
pooing rugs, stripping wax, 
re-waxing, vacuuming, 
dcaniing restrooms, chasing 
down lost keys for rooms 
for students and faculty, 
and... yes, they do 
windows! 

One of the most 
unusual events in Stepp's 
career here occurred several 
years ago. As Stepp was 
loading a large vacuum 
cleaner onto the elevator, 
the cord - inadvertantly 
and unseen ~ had become 
stuck in the door. 

As the elevator proceed- 
ed from the first floor to the 
fourth floor, the cord 
played itself out until it 
finally reached its limit and 
grabbed hold! 

There was Stepp "pinn- 
ed" behind the cleaner... 
But he finally got his hand 
out and over to the elevator 
controls, stopping the 
elevator, 

Reflected Stepp: 
"...NOT my idea of how to 
spend an evening!" 

Walking five miles a 
night to push an enormous 
vacuum cleaner up and 
down hallways is not 
everyone's idea of how to 
spend an evening, either... 
but to this crew, it's just 
part of the job. 

Stepp said his job 
would be a lot easier if the 
students would refrain from 
"depositing the juice from 
their chewing tobacco on 
the carpet and dispose of 
their cigarettes in the recep- 
tacles provided instead of 
on carpets and in the 
stairways". 



Walking miles to clean 

James K. Black 



12 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 

Information databank 
opens new world 

The College Library and prints out where the 
has started a new service information about the 
database searching 



according to Mrs. Kate 
D. Hickey, director of 
Learning Resources 
Center. 

Mrs. Hickey explain- 
ed that the service is an 
access by computer to 
databanks of information 
and citations in many 
subject fields, including 
business, education, 
engineering, and 
medicine. 

Each search by the 
computer will cost $5 -- 
which covers communica- 
tion and documentahon 
charges. Actual computer 
time charges are paid by 
a grant through the 
Pennsylvania Department 
of Education. 

In each search, the 
computer finds a topic 



topic can be found. 

To discuss the 
possibility of a search, 
students should make an 
appointment with Mrs. 
Marilyn G. Bodnar, 
reader services librarian. 
She will perform the 
search at a time when 
the communication 
charges are lower. 

Among the advan- 
tages of this program, 
Mrs. Hickey said, is that 
"it opens a whole world 
of information." This in- 
formation includes access 
to indexes which a small 
library cannot afford, fast 
service, exact informa- 
tion, and databases that 
one uses in this program 
have most up-to-date in- 
formation available. 



An alternative 
greeting card and 
party goods store 
with: 

•stationery by the pound 
•confetti by the scoop 
•SNIGLETS greeting 

cards and books 
•THE FAR SIDE greeting 

cards 
•pens, pencils, and 

novelties 



■^PECTECJA 



434 Wllllim StFMI 



YOUR KID 

,.^-f*- FROM PAGE 9 

The police stated that 
two children a day are 
found though fingerprinting 
whether they were kid- 
maped by a stranger or by 
parents in child custody 



Miss Carol Shulty, se- 
cond semester dental 
hygiene student, of South 
Williamsport, is seen here 
in picture five giving out 
literature for the microdots 
for childrens' teeth. 

This information along 
with safety tips to keep 
children protected from 
strangers, explains how to 
purchase the microdots 
from a dentist. 

Each child gets two 
dots: one for baby teeth 
and one for permanent 
teeth. The disc is dipped in 
sealant, aligned, covered 
with sealant and light 
cured. The information is 
then kept on file at the 
childfind organization. 

If a child is lost or ab- 
ducted responsible persons 
can call a number that will 
get them immediate help. It 
is 1-800-I-AM-LOST. 

Finally, authorities say 
that while dental records 
and fingerprinting should 
never be regarded as a com- 
plete solution to the pro- 
blem of child kidnapping, 
and it alone certainly will 
not stop anyone from tak- 
ing a child, nor will it help 
to free the child from his or 
her abductors, it will greatly 
increase the speed and the 
likelihood with which a 
child who is found can be 
returned to his parents. 



Q.W.A.C.C. 



MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 13 

Artwork by Arthur L. Straub 
Concept by Kathy L. Cobb 
Both of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 




cAtrooN Doc 




BARRY'S 

Brooklyn Style Eatery 
234 Park St., Williamsport 
323-FOOD(3663) 



Open 8 a.m. to midnight 

Monday thru Friday 
Saturday 2 p.m. to 3 a.m. 



Just across from the new east parking lot 

NEW-FREE-FREE-NEW 
DELIVERY SERVICE 

11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday thru Friday 

Saturday 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. 

$4.00 Minimum Order for Delivery 

Limited Delivery Area 

Special till February & March 
with any order $4.00 and over 

Get a 1 liter (33.8 oz.) for 50ct 

your choice R.C. Cola, 

Cherry R.C. Dr. Pepper or Crush 

All this at Barry's 

Where we sell no burger before it's lime 

OH — by the way 

Klerb eats here 




14 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 

Susquehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 

Monday, March 10 
Lunch: Breaded pork 
chop, gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59; ham and 
cheese omelet, homefries, 
toast, $2.89. 

Dinner: Meatloaf, gravy, 
potato and vegetable, $2.59; 
BBQ ribs, gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.89. 

Soup: Homemade soups 
served daily. 
Tuesday, March 11 

Lunch: Sausage 
calabrese, Italian bread, 
$2.39; roast chicken, gravy, 
potato and vegetable, $2.39. 

Dinner: Salisbury steak, 
potato and vegetable, $2.39; 
Fish and chips, and 
vegetable, $2.39. 
Wednesday, March 12 

Lunch: Linquine/red 
clam sauce, Italian bread, 
$2.59; Veal parmigiana 
w/pasta, Italian bread, 
$2.59. 

Dinner: Filled chicken 
breast, gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.79; deep sea 
delight, potato and 
vegetable, $2.95. 
Thursday, March 13 
Lunch: Macaroni and 
cheese, vegetable, $2.19; 
pork stir fry over rice, 
$2.39. 
'5 Dinner: Spaghetti 

} Napilitano, small salad bar, 
t Italian bread, $2.89; Beef 
4 pot pie and vegetable, 
J $2.39. 
» Friday, March 14 

Lunch: Rigatoni in meat 
sauce, Italian bread, $2.19: 
chicken nuggets, potato and 
vegetable, $2.89. 



The Susquehanna Room 
will have a daily breakfast 
special. The sandwich bar 
will be serving steak sand- 
wiches, barbeques, and chili 
on a daily basis. 



What's cookin' this week 
at Le Jeune Chef? 



Offerings this week at Lejeune Chef, the 
student-operated restaurant in the Lifelong 
Education Center are: 

Wednesday, March 12 

Special: Yankee pot roast of beef, Chinese 
style vegetables or peas and pearl onions, noo- 
dle kugel, rolls ana beverage. 

Soup: Chicken vegetable soup. 

Light lunch: Blackstone salad, cup of soup, 
roll and beverage. 

Desserts: Banana rum pie, Raspberry cassis 
granita, cherry berries on a cloud. 
Thursday, March 13 

Special: Ham with spice fruits, gingered car- 
rots or broccoli with herbal butter, brown rice 
medley, roll and beverage. 

Soup: Creamy garlic soup. 

Light lunch: Mediterranean chicken salad, 
cup of soup, roll and beverage. 

Desserts: Strawberry-chocolate Bavarian 
cream, peanut delite, chocolate rum eclairs. 
Friday, March 14 

Special: Baked stuffed flounder, green bean 
bundles or dcrisy carrots, petite salad, roll and 
beverage. 

Soup: Creamy potato soup. 

Light Lunch: Marinated vegetable salad, cup 
of soup, roll and beverage. 

Desserts: Chocolate cheese pie, cold mocha 
souffle, cherry supreme. 



The Le Jeune Chef, the student operated restaurant, 
will be closed March 19 through March 26 due to special 
events. 




MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 15 

Bulletin Board 



Monday, March 10 through Sunday, March 16 

MEETINGS 

Student Government Association... executive, 4 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 
11, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center (LEC). 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... noon to 1 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 11, Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center (LEC). 

Alpha Omega Fellowship...? to 10 p.m., this Wednesday, March 12, Room 218, 
Academic Center (ACC). 

ACTIVITIES 

Raffle... Agribusiness Club, noon to 3 p.m., all this week, members will be 
sellin g tickets around the Main Campus. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

Open House... noon to 4:30 p.m., this Sunday, March 16, all areas of the College. 

Bloodmobile... 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., this Thursday, March 13, Natural Resources 
Management Center. Sponsored by the American Red Cross and the Student 
Government Association (SGA). 

SALES 
Daffodil Sale... Orders taken today through Wednesday, March 12. Interested per- 
sons may call College Ext. 763. for further ii\formation. Orders may be picked up at 
the Recreation Center Office, Room A137, LEC, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., March 13. 
Sale benefits the American Cancer Society. Sponsored by the College Activities Of- 
fice, the Student Government Association, and the Horticulture Qub. 

Bake Sale... Health Assistant Club, secondary students, 9 a.m. to 1;30 p.m., this 
Friday, March 14, Academic Center Lobby. 

SPORTS 

Intramural Soccer and Softball... Sign-up deadline today, team rosters available in 
Room A137, LEC. 

Weight Training Clinic... 4 to 5:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 11, sign up 
in Room A137, LEC. 

Basketball... 7 to 9 p.m., this Thursday, March 13, Phi Beta Lambda vs College 
alumni. Spectators welcome. 



CILLO'S COLLEGE CORNER 



Phone 322-1321 

1100 W.Third Street 

(Next to Academic Center) 



Your favorite subs and burgers the way you like 'em. 

Try a CILLO'S BREAKFAST SUB 

**FREE SMALL COFFEE with any breakfast. 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS ^ Four winners . "°'^7.«?„"^*"„"™ 

-' it- , -ii 7:30 i.m. to t p.m. 

and win a half sub every week p^diy, 7:30 i.m. lo 4 p.m. 



16 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1986 



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U <%^ t& all mt» <uuC uiamot o^ ^atd udL 



;^ 



Vol. 21, No. 24 Monday, March 17, 1986 
Williamsport Area Community College, Williamsport, Pa. 

POTLIGHT 



NNe\co^ 









of g"^''L =»\so a ^«^,v,at beiote V 



.or^^'^rr^o^tt^-^i^ 



of 6^^- , also a -^^,, ^f "I^e'beet^ a oPV°Tbou>. ^^^^^p" 



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■14 



IN THIS ISSUE 
Plants thrive in 
greenhouse "Over 
the Mountain": See 
Special photo- 
feature starting on 
page 20. 




SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 



Bloodmobile at campus 
exceeds goal 

Last Thursday's Bloodmobile at the Natural 
Resources Management Center in Allenwood col- 
lected 48 pints of blood, which was three pints over 
the expected goal of 45, according to Kathryn A. 
Landis, secretary to the director of Natural 
Resources Management. The Bloodmobile was 
sponsored by the American Red Cross and the Stu- 
dent Government Association. 



Special distribution for Open House 

This week's edition of The SPOTLIGHT, student 
newspaper of the Williamsport Area Community Col- 
lege, is being distributed on Sunday, for the College 
Open House, as well as on Monday, the usual day. 
In this way, we, too, welcome visitors to our College! 

This newspaper represents the combined efforts of 
students in various curricula — journalism, graphic arts, 
advertising art, mass communications, and others. By 
working on the newspaper — and it IS work! — they 
gain theoretical knowledge as well as practical 
knowledge. 
—The adviser 



■■■■VALUABLE COUPON— | 

FREE PIZZA 

Buy any size Little Caesars 

OrigJDal round pizza at regular 

price, get the identical pizza GOLDEN STRIP 

FREE with this coupon. GIANT PLAZA 



327-8600 



'.A.C.C. ttndcnts me 
tdditionil 10% only «rilh 
itadeni I.D. ind Ihii id. 



One coopon per cgilomer. Cirr; ogl only. 
At pirtkipillni lociUoni. 



© 191! UlUt C«tjir Emerpnio. Int 



SPOTLIGHT 

The SPOTUGHT is pubUshed 
weekly on Monday mornings ex- 
cept for official College vacations 
by interested students. Opinions 
expressed are those of the staff as 
a whole or of individual writers 
and /contributors and do not reflect 
offidal institutional opinion. 
Office is in Room 7, Basement, 
Academic Center. 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Ext. 
221. 

STAFF 
Waruia F. Brown 
Managing Editor 

Cynthia E. A. Hartranft 
Advertising Director 

Kathy L. Cobb 

Administrative Affairs Editor 

and Editorial Page Editor 

Sandra L. Musgrave 

Bureau Chief 

Academic Center 

LeRoy S. Whitmirc Jr. 
Photography Editor 



Susan R. Kallansrud 

Bureau Chief 

Building Trades Center 

Catherine A, Hannon 

Bureau Chief 

janung Resources Center 

Joel J. Mader 

Bureau Chief 

Main Campus/Westside 

and Sports Reporter 

Donna L. Trimble 

Staff Associate 

and Photographer 

James E. Treese 

Chief Compositor 

and PMT Techr\ician 



STAFF ASSISTANTS 

Lisa E. Secrist, Russel J. Phillips, 

WUIiam J. Weatherwax, 

Donald S. Foye, 

Rose DiNiudo, James K. Morrissey, 

Marge DiNardo, Diana C. 

Vai\Fleet. 



MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 3 



Sarah M. Lundgren, 
surgical technology stu- 
dent from DuBois 
(seated), was awarded 
the $300 Dr. Henry G. 
Hager Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship for academic 
achievement, leadership, 
and dedication in her 
curriculum. Also in the 
photo is Donald S. 
Shade, director of finan- 
cial aid, and Mra. Bar- 
bara ). Osenkarski, in- 
structor of surgical 
technology. According to 
Shade, all surgical 
technology students are 
eligible to be considered 
for the scholarship. 
ISPOTUCHT photol 




'Macbeth' to be performed 

Shakespeare's "Macbeth", will be performed by the Independent Eye, at 7:30 
p.m., Tuesday, March 18 in the Academic Center Auditorium, as part of the 

Performing Artist Series, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of Col- 
lege activities. 

A seminar will follow the performance to discuss the production. The Indepen- 
dent Eye is a nationally-acclaimed theater ensemble. They have performed 
"Macbeth" since 1979 in such areas as Baltimore, Chicago, and Pittsburgh. 

For students, faculty and staff with College ID, admission is free. General ad- 
mission is $3 and the per-person admission is $1.50 in a group rate. 

Advance ticket reservations and ii\formation is available by telephoning College 
Ext. 763 or 327-4763. 

The performance is presented through the assistance of Theatre Association of 
Pennsylvania, the commonwealth of Pennsylvaiua Council on the Arts, and the Na- 
tional Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. 



f 



SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 

1986 teaching award effort 
successful; 45 forms received 

36 students honor instructors by nomination 
SPOTLIGHT commentary 

During the past several weeks, ttie SPOTLIGHT has printed stories concer- 
ning the College's Distinguished Teaching Awards in an effort to promote the 
nominations process and to encourage students and faculty alike to show their 
appreciation to instructors whose course instruction has made a difference in 
their lives. 

The deadline for nominations has come and gone, but not without im- 
pressive results. 

According to Dr. Robert G. Bowers, executive assistant for internal affairs, 
his office received 45 nomination forms in total. Because several instructors 
were nominated more than once, only 27 of the 45 are actual nominations 

But even that figure - 27 -- is Impressive, because according to Dr. Bowers, 
the College has never had that many faculty nominated at one time during the 
five-year history of the awards. 

Another Important point is that 36 of the 45 nomination forms were submit- 
ted by students. Dr. Bowers stated that in the past, only one third of that 
amount of students every participated. 

Just as important is the fact that this year, there Is at least one nomination 
from every single academic division of the College, including secondary 
programs. 

This seems to be the year of "firsts" for the awards program and, as 
stated by Dr. Bowers, "It seems indicative that there are a lot of good things 
going on at the College in a variety of areas." 

Perhaps the success of this year's awards program is also indicative of 
one other thing: That students have begun to care (or at least put their caring 
into action) about what kind of course instruction they are receiving and 
recognize that good learning is facilitated by good instructors. 

Dr. Bowers said that he would like to attribute this year's success to a 
variety of things which were done to encourage participation, including the revi- 
sion of the nomination form, the availability of assistance from the Tutoring 
Center, LEC, and the advertising and promotion done by the SPOTLIGHT and 
the New Week News. 

At this point, the selection committee will review the nominations and, ac- 
cording to Dr. Bowers, will go through a careful deliberating process to choose 
three instructors from those nominated. 

He stated, "It's great that the committee faces such a difficult job. They've 
got a lot of information to look at... to choose from. It will be difficult to 
choose only three recipients from so many nominations, considering that all of 
the nominations we received are nominations for good, deserving people." 

The Selection Committee faces several weeks of deliberation In which they 
must narrow down the list to only three faculty members. According to Dr. 
Bowers, the final decision should be made by April 21 - at which time the com- 
mittee will make a recommendation to the College president. Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder. Dr. Breuder will announce award recipients at commencement. 

Showing appreciation to those faculty members whose course Instruction 
has made the difference between a good learning experience and a fair or poor 
learning experience Is a responsibility which must and should be honored. 
Without the cooperation of the students, staff, employees, other faculty, and 
alumni, the College would be unable to present these awards in appreciation of 
instructor service and dedication to this institution. 

This year ■■ as never before ■- has been a huge success. Let's hope it 
becomes a tradition. 



MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 5 



Whaddya' say... ? 



Question: Are the space shuttle jokes in 
good taste? 

Where Asked: In front of the Academic Center 



Photos and Interviews 
By Donna L. Trimble 
Of the SPOTLIGHT staff 




Kirk A. Culbertson, 
welding student from 
Clarion: "The jokes are in- 
humane but some of them 
are pretty good." 



Jacqueline Y. 
Pauihamus, nursing stu- 
dent from Wiiliamspon: 
"Jokes about such a 
tragedy are sick. People 
have strange senses of 
humor." 



t 



James E. 
Mothersbaugh, broad- 
casting student from Mun- 
cy; "it's too bad that the 
shuttle tragedy has to be 
at the root of aii the jokes 
going on, but it was 
bound to happen... if not 
the shuttle, something 
else." 




Mark J. Merola, 
graphic arts student from 
IHazieton: "it's our country 
that the jokes are about. 
People should take It 
more seriously." 




Jeff W. Joseph, elec- 
trical technology student 
from Centre Hail: "it was 
history in the making and 
a very serious event. Peo- 
ple shouldn't joke about 
it." 



Karen L. Simpkins, 
dental hygiene student 
from State College: "I 
don't find them funny." 



6 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 

The White Plague': 
compelling and frightening 

By Dale L. Strange, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Frank Herbert's "The White Plague" is a compelling novel set in today s 
aae of high technology. Ifs the story of a young genetic scientist named John 
Roe O'Nem who decides to punish the entire world for a violent, terroristic act 
that took the lives of his wife and their five-year-old twins. 

The story opens in Dublin, Ireland, where John witnesses a car bomb ex- 
plosion on a crowded street. When he arrives at the scene, he discovers that 
his family is among the innocent passers-by who have been killed. Deranged 
with grief, John sets out to get even, using his talents as a bright young resear 
Cher, he creates a new genetic plague that only affects women. 
Quite an adventurous story 

The story then follows John as he sets out to see the results of his 
vengeance. He ends up in Ireland again - this time in hopes that he will be 
able to find the actual persons who were behind the bombing that destroyed 

Mr Herbert has woven quite an adventurous story here. He uses just 
enough technological jargon to make the tale realistic and his treatment of the 
main characters gives them depth and makes them very believable. 

Even with the terrible consequences of young John's plague, the reader 
will find himself sympathizing with him and understanding why he took out his 
anger on the whole world. 

It may strike a little fear 

The novel has but one weak point and that, unfortunately, Is the ending. 
It's almost as if the author got tired of writing and tied all the loose ends 
together too quickly. , ^ ,, i. 

Even with the poor ending, the book is an excellent work and really makes 
you think about the horror that our modern technology is capable of reaping. 
"The White Plague" may strike a little fear in your heart but I think that's what 
fulr, Herbert had in mind all along ,- «, , -~-«^gi^««s 



To the SPOTLIGHT: 

Thank you for your participation in our January '86 
Used Eyeglass Collection. 

This year, the Lycoming County Association for the 
Blind again surpassed its goal; over 18,000 pairs of used 
eyeglasses were collected - the largest number the LCAB 
has ever accumulated. 

It is only through the assistance of businesses, 
groups, and organizations such as your own that this 
campaign is so successful. 

Through your continued efforts, the LCAB Remedial 
Eye Care Program is able to assist low income residents 
of Lycoming County with the cost of examinations, 
glasses, and other eye care services. 

Again, thank you for your continued support in the 
success of this year's eyeglass campaign and for your in- 
terest in our Prevention of Blindness Program. 
Chris Smith 
Prevention of Blindness Coordinator 




SPOTLIGHT 

service 

acknowledged 



MONDAY, MARCH 17. 1986 SPOTLIGHT 7 




%^ 



Dietetic technician and food and hospitality students prepare meal for 370 persons 
who were served during the Ducks Unlimited dinner in the Susquehanna Room 
earlier this month. (SPOTLIGHT photo by Donald S. Foye, of the SPOTLIGHT staff] 



Owi M/wUti. an* o^uM t* *U 




7>*U S<i-uiMf .^auf^ - WmU S3 - 6.30 ^m. 

lU .6ut Stttfrn - ffUui S7 - goo ^m. 

Savuumit - 9O0 ^m. - "MlUKiftt 

a/ CU ^i«M - t.OO ^m. 

OiOtuU - StatOut* t^tU CiU4* 

6:30 ^m. Mlit ZmuL 



Butn S<mUu^ "Watci 30 - 6:30 fi-m. .£am^ 

l4U MvUcM - Tttamamm Sia^ - UtAtid U 





8 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 

SPOTLIGHTmg... Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti 

'7 stay very 
much in touch 
with students... 
The College 
should he aware 
of what students 
are thinking... 
to use input in 
a constructive 
manner." 

SPOTLIGHT photo by URoy S. Whitmire Jr., of the SPOTLIGHT staff 

By Kalhy L. Cobb and Waima F. Brown, both of the SPOTLIGHT staH 

Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities, is a native of Allen- 
wood. She has been at the College since 1978. 

Mrs. Fremiotti received a bachelor's degree in dance/movement therapy from the 
Sargent College of Allied Health, Boston University. 

Prior to becoming employed by the College, Mrs. Fremiotti furthered her educa- 
tion by studying overseas for five years in Germany and Italy. She also studied 
overseas at the Accademia di Dama Natiormle d'ltalia, concentrating in classical and ethnic 
dance. She also taught at the International School of Rome as a physical education teacher 
and taught English as a foreign language for four years. 

She taught at the Overseas School of Rome for one year as athletic director, coach, and 
health and dance instructor. Mrs. Fremiotti also did private tutoring. 
Tries for variety 

As coordinator of College activities at the College, Mrs. Fremiotti is responsible for 
evaluating all of the College activities, the special events, the Recreation Center, stu- 
dent orgaiuzations, supervising and evaluating College activity staff. 

Speaking of her position, Mrs. Fremiotti said, "I try to plan a variety of pro- 
grams, to provide students with the exposure to new activities, cultural programs, to 
make them a complete person and to give them the independence to choose." 

Mrs. Fremiotti added, "Living overseas helped my profession because I have 
learned to accept people and to work over barriers as well as be open-minded in 
dealing with people and to work together." 
'A real conunitment...' 

About the College, Mrs. Fremiotti stated, "There is a real commitment here at 
the College from faculty and staff. They are dedicated and 1 respect that... There is a 
real personal pride in this institution. The College demands respect because of the 
people here." 

In her spare time, Mrs. Fremiotti enjoys biking, cross-country skiing, and yoga. 
"A dancer's discipline - where the mind and body function as one ~ is very impor- 
tant because a person has to be physically fit to be mentally fit," she said. 

Mrs. Fremiotti and her husband, Massimo, have two sons, Andrea, 8, and Gian 
Luca, 5. Both children are bilingual and have dual citizenship. 



MONDAY. MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 




CLYDE PEELING allowed students and patents to "touch 
presentation in the Bardo Gymnasium. [SPOTLIGHT photo 
the SPOTLIGHT Staff! 

Peeling gives reptile show 



the snake" during 

fry Donna L. Trimble, of 



Qyde Peeling, of Clyde 
Peeling's Reptileland, 
presented a show about 
reptiles to the "Open Gym 
for Teens" participants on 
Saturday, March 8, in the 
Bardo Gymnasium. 

The show was the third 
aimual special activity for 
the class. 

The program was coor- 
dinated by Gail Landers, 
cultural coordinator of the 
Williamsport Recreation 
Commission. The 
Williamsport Recreation 
Commission organized the 
event. 

Peeling presented dif- 
ferent types of reptiles ~ 
such as lizards, a python 
(10 feet long, weighing 45 
pounds), rat snakes, and a 
huge tortoise. 

Peeling advised, "If 



you're bitten by a snake, 
keep calm and get to your 
doctor - and don't just put 
a tourniquet above your in- 
jury." 

The class, "Open Gym 
for Teens", is a non-credit 
course offered through the 
Center for Lifelong Educa- 
tion. The activity was spon- 
sored by the Williamsport 
Recreation Commission. In- 
structor for the class is Alan 
L. Vittorio. 

Vittorio stated that the 
purpose of the class was to 
give teenagers a place to go 
on a Saturday morning and 
to teach them the impor- 
tance of lifetime activity and 
fitness. 

The course is offered 
through the cooperation of 
the College and the 
Williamsport Recreation 
Commission. 



STUDENT 
HOUSING 

Farnbhed Rooms 

Singles, Doubles, 

ApartmcDb available 

ALL UTILITIES 
INCLUDED 

Showen and kilchen 
facilities 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine Ave. 

and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 

Both within one [1| 

biocli of WACC 

Phone 326-6536 



10 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17. 1986 

Ready, aim., shoot! 




Jett Eiwwerth, of WUliamsport, takes a break from work to enjoy a game of pool 
in the Recreation Room. 



Le Juene Chef 
to be closed 

Le )uene Chef, the 
student-operated restaurant 
in the Lifelong Education 
Center, will be closed this 
Wednesday, March 19 
through next Wednesday, 
March 26 due to special 
events. 



The Williamsport Area Community 

College 

LOCAL ARTIST SERIES 

presents 
Lewisburg Area Men 

BARBERSHOP SINGERS 

Saturday, March 22, at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Academic Center Auditorium 
Price for single performance $4.00 



Intramural Sports 

Intramural sports and activities for the week are listed ac- 
cording to information from Ms. Margot R. Bayer, evening 
College activities assistant. 

DART/POOL TOURNAME^4T 

A dart and pool tournament will be held tomorrow 
and Wednesday, March 18 and 19. The tournament will 
be held from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The tournament will be 
held in the Recreation Center in the Lifelong Education 
Center. 

SOFTBALL 

A Softball clinic will be held in Flanagan park, at the 
comer of Walnut Street and Little League Boulevard. All 
Softball participants must attend to be eligible for year- 
end awards. Softball play will begin next Monday, 
March 24. 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

A three-on-three basketball tournament will be held 
next Monday, March 24. All interested participants 
should see Ms. Margot R. Bayer, evening College ac- 
tivities assistant, in the Intramural Athletics Office, 
Room 108, Bardo Gymnasium. 



MONDAY. MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 11 




Joseph P. Balasco, construction technology student from Altoona, takes a break 
from classes to shoot a few games of pool. 

SPOTLIGHT photos by URoy S. Whitmire Jr., of the SPOTLIGHT staff 



Sandbaggers continue 
their hold on alleys 

The Sandbaggers continued to maintain control in 
bowling at the ABC Lanes last week, with 13 wins and 
5 losses. 

Last week's results, as furnished by the Lanes 
management: 
Team standings 

1. Sandbaggers, 13 wins, 5 losses; 2. F.B.N., 12 
wins, 6 losses; 3. Why Study, 11 wins, 7 losses. 
High team series 

1. F.B.N. , 1835; 2. Sandbaggers, 1741; 3. Why 
Study, 1701. 
High team single 

1. F.B.N., 634; 2. Sandbaggers, 611; 3. Why Study, 
585. 
Men's high series 

1. Dale Lingenfelter, 529; 2. Rudy Long, 526; 
3. Todd Summers, 489. 
Men's high single 

1. Mike Cotner, 205; 2. Dale Lingenfelter, 205; 
3. Todd Summers, 201. 
Top three averages 

1. Rudy Long, 190; 2. Todd Summers, 169; 3. John 
Carr, 168. 



College 
applications 
file available 

A file of college applications for 
various colleges is being established 
for students, according to Thomas 
C. Shoff, transfer counselor in the 
Advisement and Career Services 
Center. 

Shoff said that there has been a 
good response to the applications 
file which is mostly comprised of 
colleges which students of the Col- 
lege typically attend. 

Shoff added that he is also 
working on a transfer brochure that 
should be ready in the Fall. 

Students interested in transfer 
applications should contact him, he 
said, in the Advisement and Career 
Services Center, Room 157, Learn- 
ing Resources Center. 



12 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY. MARCH 17. 1986 

Heavy equipment rodeo 
highlights Open House 

By James K. Morrissey, of the SPOTLIGHT staff 

A little rivalry is expected when the Williamsport Area Commimity CoUege s 
Natural Resources Management Campus in AUenwood is the host of the Heavy 
Equipment Rodeo. 

Forty CoUege students currently enroUed in the College's service and operation 
of heavy equipment program are to compete against over 80 secondary vocational 
school students from Auburn and Homell, NY., and Pleasant Gap, m 
Pennsylvania. . . , , . 

The rodeo runs from noon to 4:30 p.m. and is part of many activities planned 
for the CoUege's Open House, an opportunity for visitors to view CoUege facilities 
and learn more about its program. 

"There's going to be five events in the heavy Equipment Rodeo," explamed 
Benjamin H Eldred, assistant professor of service and operaHon of heavy construc- 
tion equipoment at the CoUege. "The students wUl be utilizing skiUs they've learned 
in their curriculums." 

The five events include: 

"Rock RoUing", where a buUdozer operator maneuvers a rock around an 
obstacle coursfe; an "Egg ScrambUng Contest" where a backhoe operator must pick 
an egg out of a bed of sand with a tablespoon attached to his backhoe tooth and 
place it into a cup in a pipe surrounded by rocks; a "Forklift Grand Prix" where 
students on a forkUft negotiate a pre-determined course in as quick a time as possi- 
ble; "Excavator RacquetbaU" where the operator tries to dislodge racquetbaUs set on 
rubber cones laid along a course, and "Shatter the Hands of Time", featuring wheel 
loader operators attempting to remove a wristwatch from a board surroimded by 
water baUoons with an electric alarm and water baUoons. Complicating this task is a 
sharpened rod attached to the wheel loader's bucket. 

"AU the events are timed with a stopwatch," noted Eldred, adding, "and there 
wUl be first, second, and third place trophies awarded in individual events and a 
trophy for the school with the best cumulative overall performance in the five 
events." 

The three other schools vying for first prizes are the Cayuga-Onondaga Area Oc- 
cupational Center, Auburn, N.Y.; the Wildwood Career Center from HomeU, N.Y., 
and the Centre County Vo-Tech School, Pleasant Gap. 

"The CoUege has won overaU first place trophies for the last three years since 
the Rodeo began. The students from the visiting schools are high school kids and 
they'U be looking to knock us off this time," said Eldred. 

The instructor also expressed his opinion that the Heavy Equipment Rodeo 
"helps to buUd competitive spirit in everyone participating". 



Come see our 
"TROPICAL PARADISE" 

Fashion Show 

in the Academic Auditorium 

Friday, April 4 12:45 p.m. 

Shozving fashions in Fitness, 
casual, and evening wear. 

Sponsored by the Fashion 
Merchandising and Display students 



The Williamsport Area Commumty 

CoUege 
PERFORMING ARTIST SERIES 

proudly presents 

MACBETH 

Sahirday, March 18, at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Academic Center Auditorium 

Genera] 
Admission:$3.00 
Group rate:$1.50 



WACC faculty, staff, 
students with ID FREE 



For Ticket information and reservations 
call 327-47M 



CLE 

displays 
set up for 
Open House 

There will be 20 displays 
and demonstrations set up in 
the Susquehanna Room dur- 
ing Open House by the 
Center of Lifelong Education, 
, according to Mrs. Carol F. 
Kaufman, coordinator of com- 
munity and personal develop- 
ment programs. 

There will be a variety — 
from decorative sewing to 
woodworking. 

CLE also will be opening 
up seven new courses for 
registration during Open 
House. There will be on-line 
computer registration in the 
Susquehanna Room for any of 
the courses being offered 
through CLE at this time. 

Special courses developed 
to be offered during Open 
House include "Conversa- 
tional Japanese", "The Art of 
Caring", and "Pastel 
Painting". 

A second session of 
courses begins Monday, 
March 17 and CLE will be tak- 
ing applications for those 
courses also. 

The CLE Qowning Qass 
will be at Open House ~ in 
costume. Members will be 
distributing balloon animals 
and hug stickers as they have 
in previous years. 



MONDAY. MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 13 

Mentally disabled man 
subject of presentation 

There will be a lecture on "From Zero IQ to High 
School Graduation" from 7 to 9 p.m. this Thursday, 
March 20, in Room 204, Academic Center. 

The slide presentation and lecture describes the 
23-year case study of a mentally disabled individual as 
documented by his parent and educator. 

The individual, "Mr. Tom", developed from being 
diagnosed as having zero IQ to the point of living as a 
normal, functioning human being. 

This true story documents the physical, mental, 
emotional, and creative growth throughout his life. 

The story is considered uiuque because this ap- 
proach advocates visual art as input in helping an ex- 
ceptional child develop his own symbols for learning 
and communicating. 

The presenter. Dr. Robert B. Koslosky, ciurently is 
an associate professor of art at Bloomsburg University. 

He has been awarded the Distinguished Teaching 
Chair by the Commonwealth of Permsylvania and has 
been named a "Pace-Setter in art education". 

Dr. Koslosky has taught at the national and interna- 
tional levels on the topic of using art to teach excep- 
tional children. 



+ 

Keep Red Qnoss 




ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIQHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Snacks 
„ „,,, ' Hot and CoU Drinks 
P°P' / Groceries 

Gasoline 



BENSON 




flfil mini. ^ 
nMnjnarket 



Corner of 3rd and Mayn ard Sts ^ 



SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 



Bloodmobile 

to be 

on campus 

tomorrow, 

Wednesday 



The American Red 
Cross and Student Govern- 
ment Association sponsored 
Bloodmobile will be taking 
blood donations from 9:45 
a.m. to 3:45 p.m. this Tues- 
day and Wednesday, March 
18 and 19, in the Bardo 
Gynmasium. 

A goal of 480 pints is 
projected for the Blood- 
mobile's two-day visit to 
the Main Campus. 

"Sign-up sheets are 
available in Room 104 of the 
Bardo Gym for those who 
wish to make an appoint- 
ment to donate blood. This 
enables a donor to move 
directly to the front of a 



blood donation line," said 
Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, 
R.N., College nurse. 

The Willianwport 
Hospital also has a blood 
donation club for people 
wishing to donate blood 
regularly. Anyone wishing 
to join the DECA Qub may 
contact Mrs. Querimit in 
Room 104 of the Bardo 
Gynmasium or call College 
Ext. 224. 

"The orUy requirement 
to join the club is that the 
donor make an appoint- 
ment to give blood at least 
every eight weeks at his or 
her conver\ience/' said Mrs. 
Querimit. 



ART SUPPLY 
HEADQUARTERS 

• Winsor Newton & Duro 

• Strechers, pens, pencils 

• Papers, oils, acrylics, 
water colors 

• Canvas, easel, pads 

• Calligraphy 

As well as 

• Drafting supplies 

• Accounting supplies 

• Typing supplies 

• Paper by the pound 

10% discount to students & 
faculty w/I.D. 

Huffman's Office 
Equipment Co. 

209-213 East Third Street 
Williamsport Pa. 17701 
Phone (717) 326-2481 



Deadlines approaching 
for April bus trips 

Reservations for the New York City and 
Washington, D.C. bus trips are still being accepted but 
the deadlines are "fast approaching" for payment, ac- 
cording to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coorclinator of Col- 
lege activities. 

Reservations and payments are being accepted at 
the College Activities Office in Bardo Gymnasium. 

The coordinator said that the first bus reserved for 
the April 5 New York City trip is filled and a second 
bus has been scheduled. 

The bus will leave the Learning Resources Center 
bus loop at 6 a.m. After the day in New York, the bus 
will leave at 9 p.m. to return to Williamsport. 

The deadline for reservations for the trip is this Fri- 
day, March 21. "Students are encouraged to get their 
money in because reservations are confirmed by pay- 
ment," Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

The Wasfungton, D.C. bus trip will be on April 19. 

The bus to Washington, D.C. will leave the Learn- 
ing Resources Center bus loop at 6 a.m. Participants 
will be dropped at The Sn^thsonian. The bus will leave 
Washington at 9 p.m. 

The deadline for the Washington trip is April 4. 

Reservations may be made by telephoning College 
Ext. 269. 

The cost for either trip is $20 for students, faculty, 
and staff, and $22 for the pubhc. Money is not 
refundable. 

"Payment is for transportation oiJy," Mrs. Fremiotti 
noted and added, "Those who take the trips are free to 
plan their own activities." 



MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 15 



Student Recognition Banquet 
to be held in April 



The eighth annual Stu- 
dent Recognition Banquet 
will be held in the Sus- 
quehanna Room at 6:30 
p.m. on April 23, according 
to Gregory S. Lange, Stu- 
dent Government Associa- 

Susquehanna Room 
Menu for the Week 

Monday, March 17 
Lunch; Baked meatloaf, 
potato and vegetable, $2.39; 
sauerkraut & franks, mash- 
ed potatoes, $2.19. 

Dinner; Imposter 
lobster, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59; baked fill- 
ed pork chop, potato and 
vegetable, $2.79. 

Soup; Homemade soups 
served daily. 
Tuesday, March 18 

Lunch; Roast top round 
of beef, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59; baked 
smoked ham, potato and 
vegetable, $2.39. 

Dinner: Roast chicken, 
potato and vegetable, $2.59; 
enchilidas, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59. 
Wednesday, March 19 

Lunch; Fried clam 
strips, potato and vegetable, 
$2.59; beef stew; over 
noodles, $2.39. 

Dinner: Chili con came, 
potato and vegetable, $2.59; 
stuffed shells and sausage, 
and Italian bread, $2.89. 
Thursday, March 20 
Lunch; Roast turkey and 
filling, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59; diced ham, 
macaroni and cheese, 2.19. 

Dinner; Poached Swiss 
steak, potato and vegetable, 
$2.89; fish and chips, 
vegetable, $2.39. ' ■ 
Friday, March 21 

Lunch; Fish nuggets, 
potato and vegetable, $2.39; 
French dip, potato and 
vegetable, $2.59. 



tion (SGA) president. 
The banquet honors 
students who have shown 
outstanding leadership and 
given service to the College 
commuiuty, said Lange, 
who is an accounting stu- 
dent from Lock Haven. 
Lange said faculty and 
staff "are being encourag- 
ed" to submit names of 
those whom they feel have 
shown those qualities. 
The names are needed 
by next Monday, March 24, 
in the College Activities Of- 
fice, Room 108, Bardo Gym, 
according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities. 
The menu for the even- 



ing — which begins with a 
social with vegetable trays, 
dip and punch - includes a 
buffet of shrimp stir fry, 
Swedish meatballs, chicken 
in garlic and butter, winter 
mix, com, shell salad, and 
cole slaw. 
There will be a dessert 
buffet including brownies, 
pudding, cake, and cookies 
after the presentation of 
awards, according to John 
Vitali, supervisor of food 
services. 
The deli area of the 
Susquehanna Room will be 
used to serve students, 
added Vitali. 
The event is co- 
sponsored by the College 
Activities Office and SGA. 



An alternative 
greeting card and 
party goods store 
with: 

•stationery by the pound 
•confetti by the scoop 
•SNIGLETS greeting 

cards and books 
•THE FAR SIDE greeting 

cards 
•pens, pencils, and 

novelties 



I^I^EPrEI^A 



434 William SttMl 
Wllllimapon. PA 17701 
(717) 322-6356 



16 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 




Bicycle»-High Wheeleis 



MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 17 



The Lycoming County Historical 
Museum — A walk through the past 

Story by Oney M. Wells and Photos by Donald S. Foye of the SPOTLIGHT Staff. 



Walking through the 
door of the Lycoming 
County Historical 
Museum, one may hear 
the sound of an 18th Cent- 
tury music tx)x. ine 
sweet music fills the 
museum, adding an 
almost magical quality to 
the exhibits. 

The Victorian Parlor 
is to this reporter the 
most beautiful of all the 
exhibits in this treasure 
house of the past. The 
fiunishings are all 
original pieces from the 
Victorian Era. It's easy to 
spend endless nours 
looking over the many 
photo albums and pain- 
tings on the walls. 

The American Indian 
Room is testimonial to 
men's primitive past. The 
skeleton ot an Indian 
woman lay in a glass 
case, a mute witness to 
the past history of the 
American Indian 
civilization. 

The Logging Era is 



represented as the time 
when Williamsport was 
really alive. A place of 
great wealth and pro- 
sperity. All aspects of log- 
ging are explained and 
Illustrated from the 
beginning to the end of 
an era when this city was 
really great. 

The Ralston General 
Store was taken down 
piece by piece and rebuilt 
in the museum to 
become one of the 
museums' newest ex- 
hibits, showing what life 
was like in the era of ear- 
ly coal mining. 

And there is much 
more, the Hall of In- 
dustry, the War Exhibit, 
the old time fire engine, 
all with their stories to 
tell. But the best of all of 
these is the Shempp Toy 
Train Collection. It is one 
of the finest collections in 
the United States. One 
train on display is on 
loan from President 
Ronald Reagan. The run- 



ning displays will make a 
grown man feel like a kid 
again. 

After seeing all this, the 
fun isn't over yet-Joseph 
J. Zebrowski, the 
museum director can 
answer any questions you 
might have and there's a 
gift shop to visit. Recep- 
tionists at the front desk 
are more than happy to 
help you pick out just 
the right souvenir to 
remember your visit. 

The Lycoming Coun- 
ty Historical Museum is 
accredited by the 
American Association of 
Museums and is open to 
the public Tuesday 
through Saturday, 9:30 
a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, 
from 1:30 to 4 p.m. The 
museum is closed Mon- 
days and holidays. There 
is a $2.00 general admis- 
sion, $1.00 for children 12 
and under, $1.50 for 
senior citizens, and 
membership is open to 
all. 




Joseph J. Zebrowski, Museum director 
demonstrating how the old time com huskets were us- 
ed in the colonial days. 



18 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 



Human 

Services 

Club 

Needs 

Helpers, 

Members 



Report by Sharon Doebler, 

pietident, and Jayla Selfe, 

vice president. 



The Human Services 
Qub in association with the 
Peer Information and Refer- 
ral Center, would like to re- 
mind students, faculty, and 
interested public of its ac- 
tivities through March and 
April. 
Guest speaicer on Thursday 
Guest speaker for the 
month is Mildred James, 
case worker and foster 
parent coordinator from the 
Montour County Children 
and Youth Services of 
Danville. 
She will speak on 
"Child Abuse" on Thurs- 
day, March 20, from 3:30 to 
5 p.m. in Room 132, 
Academic Center. 
All human services 
students are encouraged to 
attend. The public is also 
welcome to attend. 
Volunteers needed 
Volunteers are needed 
to assist with the following 
club projects: 
~ Book 'n' Bake Sale, 
to be held Wednesday, 
April 9 from 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. in the Academic 
Center Lobby. 
Volunteers are needed 
to help with book and bak- 
ed goods donations, collec- 
tions, and to assist at sale 
tables. 



- Easter Egg Hunt, for 
the Crippled Children's 
Society, 625 W. Edwin St. 
We still need a few 
volunteers to help color 
eggs and to assist with the 
project on location. If in- 
terested in either activity, 
persons may contact the 
staff at the Peer Center or 
any of the club officers. 
Members needed 
We need 15 charter 
members for the Human 
Service Club to remain as a 
recognized organization of 
the College. 
To date, nine students 
have signed the register 
and paid their club dues. 
Dues are $2 for the 
semester. 
Students may register at 
the Peer Information and 
Referral Center. 
Special note to current 
members: "Please pay dues 
as soon as possible!" 



LAMBS to perform Saturday 

The Lewisburg Area Men Barbershop Singers (LAMBS) will perform in the 
Academic Center Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. this Saturday, March 22, as part of the 
continuing local artist series, according to Mrs. JoArm R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
College activities. 

LAMBS will present Chordbuster March, If I Could Write A Song, Wild Irish Rose, If 
I had the Last Dream Left in the World, and When It's Nighttime in Dixieland. 
Since 1975 

The group consists of 20 to 30 men from the local areas of Lewisburg, Milton, 
Mifflinburg, SeIir\sgrove, Sunbury, Watsontown, and Williamsport. 

They have been singing for local audiences since 1975. 

The Legani-Hanne Chapter of Sweet Adelines, under the direction of Sally 
Smith, of Williamsport, will perform at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 5. The local 
chapter of Sweet Adelines is one of 740 chapters in the United States. 

Please continue reading on next page.. 



MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 19 



A THOMAS EDISON display 
in tlie Library, Learning 
Resources Center, includes an 
assortment of antique articles 
from the collection of Edison 
memorabilia of Scott E. Herr, 
an electrical occupations stu- 
dent from Shamokin. Herr 
first had a display for the 
College's Open House in 1985 
in the Technical Trades Two 
Building. Included in the cur- 
rent display are lightbulbs, 
photos, records, and books. 
Some of the articles are from 
as far away as Portland, Ore. 
ISPOTLIGHT photo by Donna L 
Trimble, of the SPOTUGHT 
staff] 




LAMBS to perform Saturday 

Continued from preceding page 

No free tickets 

Series tickets are $10 and Individual concerts are $4. The $10 pays for that seat 
for the entire series, Mrs. Fremiotti noted. 

There are no free tickets. 

Tickets may be picked up in the Reaeation Center,' Room A137, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center, during the hours of 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Thursday. 

Persons who wish additional information may call College Ext. 763, Mrs. 
Fremiotti said. 

She noted that local business sponsors of the local artist series are B&S Picture 
Frames Inc., North Central Amusements Company Inc., Ball Travel Service, 
Deliverance Lifetime Sports, Sheraton-WiUiamsport, and Presto Print. 

Also, Commonwealth Bank and Trust Company, Jersey Shore State Bank, Nor- 
thern Central BaiJc, Founders Federal Savings and Loan Association, and the 
Williamsport National Bank. 



20 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 

Over 

the 

mountain: 

A glimpse 

of the 

Allenwood 

campus 

SPOTLIGHT photos by LeRoy 
S. Whitmire Jr., of the 
SPOTUGHT staff 
Text by ]ames K. Morrissey, of 
the SPOTUGHT staff 

The glasshouM contains 

500 different varieties of 

plants and was built in 

1973, the first year of 

operation of the Natural 

Resources Marugment 

Campus. It cost $30,000 to 

construct. The glasshouse 

project acttuUly began on 

the College's Main Campus 

and was transferred 13 

years ago. 




A "hall of foliage" in the Natural Resources Maruge- 
ment Center at Allenwood can be seen by the visitor. 
There are 40 to 50 different varieties of potted plants. 
The greenhouse cost $12,000 to construct and was built 
by floriculture students eight years ago. The plants and 
shrubbery here are sold regularly by floriculture 
students to bring money back into their program. 



•^ 



MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 




Surveying the terrain are, from left, Richard R. 
Erickson, of Kylertown; Francis X. Dincher, of 
Williamsport; William G. Wilmoth, of Union City, and 
Kenneth E. King, of Milton. These service and opera- 
tion of heavy construction equipment students are, ac- 
cording to Richard W. Rankinen, associate professor of 
forest technology: "...surveying for the benefit of 
understanding elevations which are involved with any 
type of construction you work on." 




Dennis E. Fink, hor- 
ticulture instructor, 
demonstrates the intricacies 
of shrub potting to 
students in his house and 
conservatory plants class. 



SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 

The Human Service Practicum. . . 
A Unique Experience 

A Special Report 

By Students in the Human Services Program 

with a foreword by Thomas A. Zimmerman, 

instructor, human services/ social science 



Presented by The SPOTLIGHT 
as they wrote it.... 



One element integral to the learning experience at the 
Williamsport Area Community College is the opportunity for field 
placement for credit - a chance for the student to gain on-the-job 
knowledge in the career area of choice while enrolled in his or her 
curriculum prior to graduation. 

The students enrolled in the Human Service Associate Degree 
Program of the Integrated Studies Division of the College are no 
exception. 

Coordinated both through the Division Office and the Office for 
Experiential Learrung (CO-OP), Human Service majors may log as 
many as 480 hours of in-placement credit working in agencies and 
programs helping those in need while they are enroute to their 
degree. 

What follows are the comments of some of the students in the program 
which we feel articulate the many dividends of practicum placement which 
makes field experience rewarding and unitjue. 

-Thomas A. Zimmerman 



PriscUla M. Hall 

I chose my practicum while taking Sexual Assault Training 
Classes offered at the YWCA last Spring. During the training, I 
learned about Wise Options for Women. When a practicum oppor- 
tunity arose at WOW, I felt it would be a great learning experience. I 
was right! 

At WOW, I put what 1 had learned in my Crisis Intervention and 
Fundamentals of Counseling courses to work immediately. Also, the 
psychology and sociology courses which I have taken gave me in- 
sight as to how to cope vrith many of the situations which the clients 
at WOW presented. 

My career goals have changed many times during the past year 
in part as a result of my practicum. I do know that I want to work in 
the human services field as I have a need to help others. 

My advice to someone entering their first practicum would be as 
follows: Find out if the placement is in the field you thirjc you want; 
know the skills you practiced in your classes, and remain 
open-minded. 



MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 23 



Special. . 
Maiy Ann Amoldin 

I chose to do my practicum with Concern, Professional Children, 
and Youth Services, of Lewisburg, Pa. I learned of the agency by re- 
questing an interview with the supervising therapist in the 
Lewisburg office. 

She informed me that the primary focus of service is to provide 
foster care for deprived, dependent and delinquent children. Con- 
cern also provides supportive services and training for foster parents 
to enable them to care for children and adolescents who might other- 
vvrise have lived in residential institutions. 

I found my experience to be rewarding because I was able to 
assist and listen to children and youth who have had tough life ex- 
periences. Many had emotional problems which they related to me. I 
found that many of them wanted to return to their natural homes 
but were unable to do so due to various conditions. 

The courses I had in psychology, sociology, and human services 
(skills) gave me some dues regarding understanding where the kids 
were "coming from". 

Many came from low income homes which provided them with 
little stimulation. Through Concern, they live in structured foster 
homes and are improving. Several of the kids are developing 
positive self-esteem, with supportive foster parents backing them. 
One major thing I learned during the practicum is how important it 
is for parents to spend quality time with their children for them to 
grow in a healthy way. . . to take time to teach their children and 
listen to them when they need support. 



Shirley Lucas 

I chose to do my prachcum with the Lycoming County Associa- 
tion for the Blind. Being visually impaired myself, 1 felt I could better 
relate to the clients' experiencing loss of sight. In the past, I had 
worked at the Association in a clerical capacity. Thus, I was 
somewhat familiar with the agency and the services they provide. 

I enjoyed all aspects of my practicum experience, particularly get- 
ting out and working with clients on my own. It's one thing to prac- 
tice skills in a classroom or to accompany a social worker on a home 
visit, but it's entirely different when you work independently with 
"real" clients on a one-to-one basis. I feel this is the best way to 
apply the skills learned in a course. 1 also enjoyed working vAth the 
agency orientation and mobility instructor and the opportunity to at- 
tend several different types of meetings. 1 observed a variety of func 
tions within the agency and also noted different agencies working 
together for the benefit of shared clients. 

Regarding human services coiu'ses, 1 was pleased to discover that 
what I had learned in the classroom coincided with the actual work 
experience. Oftentimes, 1 have heard people say that "working is 
very different from what 1 learned in school". 1 did not find this to 
be the case and felt fully prepared for the work experience and able 
to get the most benefit from it. 

My practicum experience was worthwhile ~ 1 obtained valuable 
work experience. I was also enlightening; 1 realized that I want to 
further my education... a two-year degree won't fulfill my dream! 

If you attempt a practicum, don't be afraid to ask questions or to 
make suggestions. Oftentimes, a new person in an agency can see 
things in a different light and spot problems previously overlooked. 
Fresh ideas and insight can be a valuable asset to any agency! 



Human Services 




24 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 



Special... Human Services 



Alexis Kandra 

I began my practicum at the Selinsgrove State Center during the 
first week of June 1985. The Center is an institution for mentally 
handicapped individuals who cannot lead "normal" lives in the 
community. However, there are some who could, given the chance, 
live in the community in a supervised apartment or a group home. 

During my first week, 1 went through the orientation process 
and did not have any direct contact with residents. This allowed me 
to get a feel for the Center and to get more "comfortable" with 
working in an institution ~ a word and a place that had always had 
a cold and ominous mearung to me. My next five weeks were really 
something! I felt I was learning more and being exposed to things 
that I had never really encountered before. 

From 6 to 8:30 a.m., I worked in a male living area assisting with 
toothbrushing, shaving and other morning routines. I chose to work 
primarily with one resident who was profoundly mentally retarded. 
He was non-verbal and required "total care". The rest of each day I 
spent in a recreational facility teaching some of the residents to per- 
form simulated work tasks as best they could. I particularly enjoyed V jj' 
this part of the day because 1 got to know the residents... to learn g^J; 
from them and 1 truly enjoyed doing so. 1 felt really good about H*^ 

working with the residents... I felt privileged and fortunate to have 
an opportunity to help them. 

My practicum experience was very positive and I believe 1 could 
never have learned all I did at the Center from a book. However, my 
courses at W.A.C.C. - particularly psychology and a seminar in 
mental retardation — were very helpful to me. 1 also am partictilarly 
grateful to my parents for their support during the practicxim. 



Maige Waugh 

I spent my practicum having fun! I worked at Bostley's Day Care 
in Montoursville. Working with children is something I never con- 
sidered myself particularly good at or imagined enjoying particularly. 
When my adviser suggested a day care facility for my practicum, 1 
was anxious. The experience would be new and different... a 
challenge. 

My challenge began immediately. The first two weeks were a 
period of adjustment as 1 got to know everyone and their schedules. 
I must have memorized 50 name those first few weeks. 1 joined the 
school-aged children most of the time. We played, did school work 
and went on field trips. My feet still ache at the thought of all the 
walking we did. 

I was given the opportunity to work with a small t:>oy on a one- 
to-one basis to help him improve vocabulary and reading skills. The 
last few weeks of my practicum were spent with the younger 
children (ages 1 to 5) who were divided into three age groups. I 
moved from group to group and had more independence as I taught 
and supervised the groups frequently on my own. 

I learned a great deal at Bostley's and could relate it to my major 
and to material I had learned about testing, behavioral problems, 
behavioral therapy techniques and basic interviewing skills. 

1 also learned to work with people in a helping environment pro- 
viding education and guidance for children in a safe and positive at- 
mosphere. 1 learned how stubborn children can be and how to get 
them to cooperate. At Bostley's, I learned that working with children 
is hard but important work and loads of fun. 





MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 25 



Special... Human Services 



n 



My advice to any student considering a practicum for the first 
time is don't be shy. You should just plunge right in... don't be 
afraid to make mistakes or to ask questions. Remember that you do 
not have to be perfect or know everything. Just do your best and 
lelaxi 



Gayla ]. SeUe 

Although my adviser couldn't place me in an agency providing 
services directly linked with my career goals, an alternative agency 
was found that provided me with the experiences and objectives 
directly related to courses within the human services curriculum — 
which is my major. 1 spent my first practicum with Homemaker 
Help Services in the Clinton County Office. 

Among my various duties and responsibilities with the agency, 
the practicum experience gave me both the opportunity and the 
potential for improving interviewing and listening skills, completing 
service needs and eligibility assessments, and evaluating clientele 
regarding their needs for continuation of services and plarming 
residential placement. 

As an intern, 1 was given the opportunity to work on my own 
and to participate in progressively more difhcult tasks. Eventually, 1 
was entrusted to supervise the office and agency activities. I found 
my practicum both valuable and rewarding. 

As an intern within a practicum experience, no matter what it is, 
don't be afraid to ask questions or to volunteer opinions 
(diplomatically, of course)! Also, don't be shy about participating in 
new experiences connected with agency practices because doing so 
may prove to be rewarding and beneficial in improving your skills 



Fashion show set 
for April 4 

There yirill be a fashion 
show at 12:45 p.m. on April 
4 in conjunction with the 
Business Symposium, accor- 
ding to Georgia Holt, 
fashion merchandising and 
display student from 
Morrisdale. 

The show will be held 
in the Academic Center 
Auditorium. 

The show is sponsored 
by the fashion merchandis- 
ing and display students. 

The theme of the show 
will be "Tropical Paradise". 
The categories will be 
fitness, casual, and evening. 

Sixteen models will be 
chosen. 



BARRY'S 

I Brooklyn Style Eatery 
234 Park St., Williamsport 
323-FOOD(3663) 



Open 8 a.m. to midnight 

Monday thru Friday 
Saturday 2 p.m. to 3 a.m. 




Just across from the new east parking lot 

NEW - FREE - FREE - NEW 
DELIVERY SERVICE 

11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday thru Friday 

Saturday 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. 

$4.00 Minimum Order for Delivery 

Limited Delivery Area 

Special till February & March 
with any order $4.00 and over 

Get a 1 liter (33.8 oz.l (or S0< 

your choice R.C. Cola, 

Cherry R.C. Dr. Pepper or Crush 

All this al Barry's 

W.A.C.C. ROOMS FOR RENT 
INQUIRE AT BARRY'S 




26 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 Special... Human Services 

Sharon Doebler 

I spent seven weeks last summer doing my practicum at the 
Clinton County Children and Youth Services Agency. I worked full- 
time under the direct supervision of the Agency Casework 
Supervisor. 

Having four children of my own, 1 felt I could relate to most of 
the issues confronting parents. My placement with the agency was 
helpful as Lock Haven is my hometown and 1 believe 1 fit in well 
with the staff and clientele due to my awareness of the failing 
economy of our community. 

The service goal of the agency is "to protect children from abuse, 
to ensure their opportunity for healthy growth and development, 
and, whenever possible, to preserve and stabilize family life". 

My practicum provided a wide range of experiences. 1 observed 
court hearings, made home visits with each of the caseworkers, 
visited foster homes, drove children to the Infant Development Pro- 
gram, Clinton County Day Care and to home visitations, took intake 
information over the telephone, and followed up on the intakes 
assigned to me by the agency casework supervisor. 

1 also attended agency staff meetings. As time passed, 1 was 
given greater responsibility. I was assigned two families that 1 work- 
ed very closely with and my work included writing a Family Service 
Plan for each family, making several home visits, arranging for ser- 
vices to be provided to each family and making referrals to other 
area agencies when appropriate and necessary. In both cases, I gave 
each family member as much support as 1 could. Throughout my 
practicum, 1 drew on knowledge 1 obtained in my human services 
courses, in marriage and the family courses, and in developmental 
psychology. 

1 am grateful that 1 had the opportuiuty to do my practicum with 
the agency because 1 was given responsibility and I knew that I was 
accountable. The casework supervisor was always willing to answer 
any questions I had and 1 felt that 1 earned her trust and confidence. 
Most supervisors don't expect students to do everything perfectly, 
but they do expect them to do their best. 

At the agency, all staff must maintain client confidentiality, be 
emphatic and display assertiveness and self<onfidence in order to be 
effective. Many times it is difficult to establish a balance and ex- 
perience seems to be ther only true way to learn this. In this respect, 
my practicum represents a starting point. 

Kay Wagner 

Two factors influenced my choice of a practicum site... I wanted 

>- to work for an agency that dealt with children and I also wished to 

•'' be placed in Clinton County where 1 reside. The Lock Haven Infant 

Development Program fulfilled both requirements. The agency deals 

with developmental delays in infants and young children and is 

located approximately four miles from my home. 

During my practicum, I was involved in home visitation. I ac- 
companied the IDP Outreach Teacher on her weekly rounds to 
children who were too young or physically handicapped to come to 
the IDP Center. The teacher uses play therapy techniques designed 
to develop and enhance both the motor and the cogiutive skills of 
her small clients. 

I also participated in intake and assessment visits during which 
children referred to the Program from a variety of referral sources 

Please continue reading on next page.... 



MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 27 



Special 
...continued from preceding page 

were tested and their eligibility for the program detemuned. 

In addition, I had the oportunity to attend a seminar on child 
development with the IDP staff at the Lock Haven University. The 
day-long seminar turned out to be an enriching and delightful ex- 
perience as well as an educational one. A highlight of the seminar 
was onbserving a team evaluation of a child with Down's Syndrome 
conducted by a pediatric psychiatrist, a psychologist, and a physical 
therapist. 

In addition, throughout my practicum I had the opportunity to 
observe and participate in the day-to-day practical experiences and 
inner workings of this unique human services agency. This left me 
with many lasting impressions. 

Human service professionals - particularly those with whom I 
worked ~ are competent and professional. I learned muchg from 
them: both factually and experientially. They are also very human, 
warm, and friendly; they made me feel welcome and engendered 
some coi\fidence in myself. When you enter a practicum, keep an 
open mind, be willing to learn and don't be afraid to offer a sugges- 
tion now and then. Your life experiences can be a valuable asset! 

Lene Zarzyczny 

I chose the Lycoming County Day Treatment Program as my 
practicum site through the help of my faculty adviser after reviewing 
several possible agencies and making a final decision to work with 
adolescents. During my practicum, there were several highlights. 

I had the opportunity to sit in on several court hearings which 
was quite an experience for me... both a chance to see how the court 
system works and a shock to see juveniles only 12 or 13 years old in 
trouble. 

I had the chance to visit other agencies serving the same popula- 
tion where I felt there was a lot more tension present than that felt 
at my practicum site. I give a lot of credit to the people who par- 
ticipate in those agencies and programs. 

Almost all the youths 1 encountered in my practicimi had some 
kind of family problem. Although there were others as well - drugs, 
truancy, theft - family problems seemed to be the most common 
and recurrent. 

I can relate many of the courses I have taken with my ex- 
periences in my practicum. The skills 1 learned in the Helping Pro- 
cesss Qass were beneficial although there is a difference between a 
make-believe roleplay in the classroom and the reality of counseling 
a "true character". 

During my interactions with the youths at the program several 
issues from class discussion came to mind. For example: bon- 
ding/rapport building, helping versus rescuing, and open 
communication. 

After having done my practicum, my advice to future human ser- 
vice students is... make sure where ever you are placed that you get 
the full picture of the agency, program, or service. Try to participate 
in and do everything that's available to you. If there's something 
that interests you and you're not doing it, ask to... the worst thing 
that the agency supervisor will say is "no". In my practicum, I 
learned a lot about the agency and how it works, but most of all I 
feel I learned a lot about life. 



Human Sewices 




n 



28 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 



Darkness and Fears. 

Donna L. Trimble 

Primeval darkness, it's palpable. Enveloping, crowding, clutching, waiting to 
drag me down as a vortex might. 1 can dose my eyes and there 1 am, crouched in 
the farthest recesses of my mother's closet. In my head a scream is swirling, 
building in intensity, a force pulling at me, begging to be let out. 1 dare not give in 
and make a sound, because she might hear, or the darkness might hear. Who do I 
fear most, the devil 1 know, mother, or the devil 1 don't, darkness? I'm not siu-e 
which is worse. 

1 sit there staring at a fox stole that has eyes that shine in the dark. Even 
though 1 know it's not real 1 have to keep watching it. The light from under the 
door is just enough to let me see it. But wait, the light is leaving altogether. A towel 
is being pushed against the bottom of the door shutting out the light and air. I sit 
there staring at the spot where the eyes were. 1 can feel them staring back at me. 
Again I teU myself, 1 know it's not real, but my mind knows it can move. When I 
can't sleep at night it flies through the air, thrown by an unseen hand, and lands 
on my bed, driving me, cringing, into the comer made by my headboard and the 
wall. 

I can't close my eyes in the closet because then all that's out there in the dark 
will be waiting. As 1 grow damp from the heat building up in the small room 1 can 
feel them, lurking, moving, dosing in to devour me and they have a voracious ap- 
petite. These are not fantasies of a horror show addict. 1 live with these fears by 
day, and struggle vidth them at night. Obsessed by them. It's thirty-odd years later 
and 1 still shake at the memory. I can't walk into a dark room or sleep in a dark 
room alone. My husband went on a fishing trip and 1 slept with my lamps on all 
weekend. I can walk around outside a little bit at night, but not in an enclosed area. 
There are too many places for things to lurk. 

As I grew older, I knew 1 needed out of the situation in order to survive. Lucki- 
ly, my mother came from a deeply religious backgroud. Because of this, she didn't 
think it was out of the ordinary when 1 decided to become a nun while only in the 
eighth grade. This was one of the luckiest moves of my life. I got to live in a con- 
vent school away from her. 1 had some excellent help in setting my life in order 
from a nun who was prindpal of our school. She helped me formulate my own 
ideas that 1 didn't have to treat a child the way I was treated. She made me realize 
what a mother was supposed to be like, in turn giving new meaning and dignity to 
the name, mother. As my own children came along, if they showed any signs of be- 
ing afraid of the dark I gave them a night light. 1 didn't let my fears govern theirs. I 
don't believe the premise that all abused chUdren abuse. 1 know it can and does oc- 
cur, but people need to rise above their circumstances. Because of the safe haven 
that my mend. Mother Charity, provided for me 1 learned that there are all kinds of 
people out there in the world. We can't always choose who we live with, but help 
is where we look for it. Although my friend helped me overcome many fears, the 
fear of dark will always with me. 

1 sometimes feel it is the other side of man's soul. Hidden from the light of day 
by people's baser natures. Poets say the night is velvet and softness, studded with 
diamond lights in the sky. 1 believe this also, but in a dark room my skin starts to 
crawl and 1 have to run or turn a light on quickly. I have learned to live with this 
fear by avoiding areas where it vnii bother me. 1 hope by writing this 1 have con- 
vinced at least one person to consider the punishments that you pass on to your 
children. It is far reaching, like the ripples on the surface of a pond, spreading to all 
reaches of their lives. There is help out there for abused children and abusive 
parents. Churches, shelters, teachers, self-help groups, child welfare agencies, the 
list goes on and the help is there for those who seek it. Please don't wait. 1 was a 
battered child, but in my case the mental abuse was the worst. I was fortunate and 
got help early. However, the memories and fears of the darkness will always be 
with me. waiting. 



MONDAY. MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTUGHT 29 



PAIN OF SILENCE 




Sitting next to you in silence 
Afraid to speak 
I'm hurting inside 
Because your love is so weak 

I wish I knew 

Just how you feel 

You sit there so silent 

I wonder if your love was ever real 

You once said you loved me 
Now you say you don't 
Please don't confuse me 
Just tell me the truth 

Why can't you tell me? 
What IS there to hide? 
Just let me know 
Don't keep it inside 

You told me haw you feel 
But to your friends 
Something different you reveal 
To whom have you lied? 

My friends think I'm crazy 

Am I really that naive 

To think, I loved you 

When there was no love to be seen 

Now you've gone 
Leaving no trace 
My love lives on 
With memories of your face 

I dreamed of being your wife 
But somehow it would be wrong 
To place myself in a life 
Where I do not belong 

Good - bye for now 

Not forever 

I have no regrets 

For it was a love well spent 

JANET ULSAMER 
General Studies 

Williamsport 





30 SPOTUGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 




SELF RESPECT 






Take time to enjoy 






each and every day 






Then maybe.... just maybe 


Don't Hesitate 




things will be OK 






Remember always 






the many things you've done 


// you like someone, 




While never forgetting 


Why hesitate, 




life has just begun 


Tell 'em today. 




There's still tomorrow 


If you're attracted. 




you've yet to live 


Don't delay, 




Take what's yours 

but don't forget to give 


You'll miss your chance. 




Every little thing 


Life's too short. 




has a purchasing price 


Time's movin' on. 




Life never promises 


Why waste it. 




sugar and spice 


Don't be bashful 




So be yourself 


Step right up and 




live and give respect 


Tell 'em! 




You just might receive 






a lot more than you expect 


Robert L. English 
Human Services 




Lyie A. Wagner 
Graphic arts student 
Millville 


Jersey Shore 




''Feelings'' 




Time heals all wounds they say. 




But does it? 


1 




People who say they are friends hurt me. | 




Are they? 


i 




Sometimes I feel like an outcast because of them. 1 




Should I? 






Why does growing up hurt so 


bad? 




All I want to do is belong. 






Debi Camp 






Computer Science 






Montoursville 


rr..rr,-iT--T-T-TiT--iTTir-nr-Triiii-iiintli-Tillllii 



MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 SPOTLIGHT 31 



Bulletin Board 

Week of Monday, March 17, through Sunday, March 23 
MEETINGS 
», ^!",''/"' Government Association... executive, 4 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday 
March 18, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center (LEC). 

IS f*"'**"o,S,TI^*"' Association... senate, 5 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 
lo, Koom B107, LEC. 

BmT^ ^^'"''" ^"■■' "°°" '° ^ •'''"■' '°'"°"°"'' Tuesday, March 18, Room 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 18, Room 329 
Academic Center (ACC). 

Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., Wednesday, March 19, Room 218 
Academic Center. ' 

SPECIAL EVE^JTS 
BloodmobUe... 9:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 18, and 
Wednesday, March 19, Bardo Gymnasium. Sponsored by the Student Government 
Association and the American Red Cross. 

"Macbeth"... 7:30 p.m. tomorrow, Tuesday, March 18, Academic Center 
Auditonum. Free admission with CoUege ID and $3 to the pubUc. Seminar by the 
cast immediately foUowing performance. Sponsored by CoUege Activities Office as 
part of the Performing Arts Series. 

The Lewisburg Area Men Barbershop Singers (LAMBS)... 7:30 p.m., this Satur- 
day, March 22, Academic Center Auditorium. $4 per person, $10 per Series ticket 
Sponsored by the CoUege Activities Office as part of the Local Artists Series Tickets 
are available by caUing CoUege Ext. 763. 

MOVIE 
"The Return of Martin Guerra"... 8 to 10 p.m. this Thursday, March 20 and 2 
to 4 Pm., this Sunday March 23, Academic Center. Admission to either showing is 
free with CoUege ID; $5 tor public. Sponsored by CoUege Activities Office 
SALES BY STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
Hoagie sale... Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA). Members wiU be 
takmg orders today and distributing hoagies on this Wednesday, March 19 

Bake sale... Gamma EpsUon Tau, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., this Wednesday March 19 
Academic Center Lobby. 

SPORTS 
Dart tournament... 6 to 10 p.m. tomorrow, Tuesday, March 18, and this 
Wednesday, March 19. Sign up in Room A137, Lifelong Education Center Spon- 
sored by CoUege Activities Office. 

Pool tournament... same as dart tournament. 

Coed voUeyball... 5 to 9 p.m., this Sunday, March 23, Bardo Gymnasium 
Sponsored by WUliamsport Recreation Commission and the CoUege Activities Office 
Members may participate at league fee. Public invited to be spectators; no fee 
MISCELLANEOUS 
Audition... Every Monday night at Econo Lodge, 2401 E. Third St. Talent 
Showcase for the Performing Arts. CaU 326-1501 for appointment. 

"Spring Break Days"... coupons worth $3.50 toward genera] admission for 
Busch Gardens. Coupons are valid through Monday, March 31, and are available by 
caUing CoUege Ext. 763 or visiting the Recreation Center, Room A137, Lifelone 
Education Center. 

Guest speaker... 3:30 p.m., this Thursday, March 20, Room 132, Academic 
Center. Speaker is MUlie James on the subject of child abuse. 



32 SPOTLIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 17, 1986 

Employment Opportunities 

IThe inlormalion which follows is provided by the College Placement Center. Inquiries should 
be directed to that office which is in the Learning Resources Center.) 

Kurtanich Engineers and Associates, Inc., 6124 E. State St., P.O. Box 1267, 
Hemitage, Pa. 16148... would like resumes from fourth semester CT and ED 
students. Send them to Joseph A. Kurtanich, P.E., President. 

James H. Lynch, Inc., 375 David White's Lane, Southhampton, N.Y. 
11968. ..has an opening for a Landscape Crew Chief and a Nurseryman. More details 
are available in the Placement Office. 

Type Set Printing, Inc., 888 High St., Pottstown, Pa. 19464... would like 
resumes from iouxtU semester GA students. They are opening a second business in 
the Pottstown area and need to staff that office. Send resumes to the attention of 
Sharon Comeriato. 

Petrie Industrial Tractors, Inc, P.O. Box F, Delmont, Pa. 15626.. would like 
resumes from Transportation graduates for a counter parts man. They are a John 
Deere industrial equipment dealer. Send resume to Robert W. Lee, Vice Presi- 
dent/General Manager. 

S.P.S. Technologies, Highland Ave., Jenkintowm, Pa. 19046.. has second 
and third shift openings for MG & TT graduates for automatic screw machine 
trainee, grinding machine, lathe, CNC, and toolroom operators. Send resume to 
Qive Brown, Industrial Relation Represenative. 

Schnable Engineering Associates, 4009 Cordell Ave., Bethesda, Md. 
20814... will have openings in the spring and summer for CT graduates. Company 
information and applications are available in the Placement Office. Send resume to 
Michael E. Leffler, P.E., Senior Geolechnical Engineer. 

Dogwood Hill, Mile Hill Rd., R.D. 1, Box 337A, Sunbury, Pa. 17801. ..has 
an opening for a landscaper trainee and a nursery manager for spring NM 
graduates. Send resume to Richard L. Eyster. 

George T. Martinec Building & Remodeling, 100 Spencerhill Rd., Coming, 
N.Y. 14830. ..will have opening for CC & CB graduates this spring to work as 
carpenter's helpers. Send resume. 

Delivery Drivers Needed for local sub shop. Con- 
tact Barry at 234 Park St. or 'call 323-3663. 

Lost-a young sable ferret with two black dots on 
ear. Last seen around 1048 Vine Ave. If seen, con- 
tact Kelly at 323-6640 or above address. 



CILLO'S COLLEGE CORNER 



Phone 322-1321 

1100 W. Third Street 

(Next to Academic Center) 



Your favorite subs and burgers the way you like 'em. 

Try a CILLO'S BREAKFAST SUB 

**FREE SMALL COFFEE with any breakfast. 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS Four winners ^ HOURS • Mod. thra Thors. 

Ik- , M- 7:30 i.m. to 6 p.m. 

and win a half sub every week ^^^^ ^.jj ,^ ,^ ^ J^ 



lasroTucBrnMoidij, Aptu ?. \nt 

ABOUT THE COVER 

IN COVER PHOTO: Ridiogrtpby itndenU, from left, m 
Todd L. McCowin, of Pictnre Rocb; Siodra E. Petb, of 
WUliimiport, iDd Wendy J. Nfauon, of WUliinuport. 

/SPOTLIGHT pholo by URoy S. Whitmire Jr., of the 
SPOTLIGHT slqff] 



Radiography students 
To compete in finals 

Three radiography students will be going to state finals 
next month, May I through 3, at the Bedford Springs Hotel in 
Bradford. 

Todd L. McCowan, of Picture Rocks, Wendy J. Nixson, 
of Williamsport, and Sandra E. Petts, of Kulpmont, was the 
College's team in the Pennsylvania Society of Radiologic 
Technologist, District five, according to Robert J. Slothus, 
coordinator of the radiography program. 

The team competed against Geisinger's radiography 
students on March 19 at Geisinger. The contest consisted of 
two sets of 25 questions each, which covered all aspects of 
radiography, Slothus stated. "Our team beat Geisinger in a 
tie-breaker", Slothus noted. 

The College's radiography program won first place in 
1984, where the College got to keep the trophy for that year, 
and in 1985 they won third place. 

The students win cash prizes and receive a plaque. 
However, whoever wins the state finals will be State Champion, 
Slothus concluded. 



Intramural Sports 

Iitformation provided by Margol R. Bayer, evening Col- 
lege acliviiies assistant. 

SOCCER 

Indoor soccer will begin at 7 and continue until 10 p.m. 
this Wednesday, April 9 in the Bardo Gymnasium. Interested 
persons should contact Margot R. Bayer in Room 108, Gym, 
only during the hours of 2 to 10 p.m. Wednesday is deadline to 
organize teams. 

BASKETBALL 

Anyone interested in playing 3-on-3 basketball should 
contact Margot R. Bayer in Room 108, Gym, from 2 to 10 
p.m. by this Thursday, April 10. 

SOFTBALL 

The intramural Softball tournament will begin next Mon- 
day, April 14. Teams that do not show up will result in a loss. 
The tournament will be single elimination. 



SPOTLIGHT 

Vol. 21, No. 2S 
Monday, April 7, 1986 

T^e SPOTUQKT la publlslwd 

weekly on Monday momlnga axcapt 

tor official College vacatlona by )our- 

nallam and ottier Intereated students. 

Opinions expressed are ttraee of the 

staff aa a wt>o4e or of Individual 

writers and do not reflect official In- 

titutlonsi opinion. 

Office: Room 7. Bassmsnt, 

Acedemic Center. Telephone: Ext. 

221, 171 7J 326-3761. 



STAFF 

Wenna F. Brown 

Managing Editor 

Cynmia E A. Hwtrwfl 

Advertising CMrector 

Kathy L Cobb 

Administrative Affairs Editor 

Editorisi Page Editor 

Sandra L. Musgrave 

Bureau CtMf 

Academic Center 

LeRoy S. WMtmirs Jr 

Ptwtography Editor 



Susan R Kallansiud 

Acting Administrative Affaira Editor 

and Bureau Chief 

Building Tradea Center 

Cethertne A. Hannon 

Bureau CMsf 

Learning Resources Center 

JoelJ. leader 

Bureau CMaf 

Main Campus/Wastalde 

and Sports Reporter 

Oonna L. Trimble 

Staff Associate 

Jamea E. Treese 

Chief Compositor 

and PMT Technician 

STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Usa E Secrlat, Michael A. Dye. Dale 

Lee Strange, Marge Dlt4ardo. floae 

DINardo, Oiana C. VanFleet, Arthur 

L. Straub, William J Wealherwax, 

Donald S Foye, Ruaseli J. Phmipe. 

and James K. Morrtssey. 

Anthony N. CWo 

Faculty Advlaer 



Students must 
still petition 

Any student who feels he 
or she has enough credits to be 
graduated this Spring must 
petition and be evaluated, ac- 
cording to Records Office per- 
sonnel. 

This review will "not hap- 
pen automatically", they said. 

Students may petition 
right up until commencement, 
but those who wish a diploma 
must pay a SIO fee - and that 
does not guarantee that the 
diploma will be available on 
commencement day. 

For students who petition 
to graduate, transcripts will 
show graduation even if the 
student did not buy a diploma. 

Tax deadline 
soon here; 
VITA can help 

Phillip D. Landers, 
associate professor of business 
administration said he wishes 
to remind students that next 
Tuesday, April 15, is the 
deadline for filling income tax 
returns -and it is fast ap- 
proaching. 

And, he said, that means 
there are limited days left to 
take advantage of help offered 
by Volenteer Income Tax 
Assistance (V.I.T.A.). The 
V.I.T.A. service ends this 
Thursday, April 10. 

V.I.T.A. offers free in- 
come tax assistance to those 
who need help with their taxes 
and to those unable to afford 
help. 

The V.I.T.A. center is 
open Mondays and 
Wednesdays from 12 to 5 p.m. 
and Tuesdays and Thursdays 
I from 1 to 4 p.m. 



SPOTUGBTDMouU;, April 7, KMoS 



Spring graduates 

may begin to sign up 

for commencement today 



Commencement will be at 
2 p.m. Saturday, May 10, ac- 
cording to Lawrence W. Emery 
Jr., director of Advisement and 
Career Services - and prospec- 
tive graduates may begin to 
sign up today to take part. 

Commencement apparel 
will be available for purchase at 
the College Bookstore beginn- 
ing Monday, April 28. 

The price of cap, gown, 
and tassel is $12.83. The cost 



for a hood for the associate 
degree students is $11. Caps 
and tassels will be offered for 
sale separately. 

All items will be available 
in the Bookstore; no ordering 
will be necessary. 

Students should stop by 
the Advisement Center, Room 
157, Learning Resources 
Center, Emery said, to sign up 
for commencement if they in- 
tend to participate. Sign-up 
starts today. 




Having jusi donated a pint of blood, Jack G. Schullz, 
nursery management student from Havertown, chats with 
Red Cross nurse, Ms. Annette Lavelle. fSPOTUCHT photoj 



4a8POTUGHTaMnd<;, April 7, \nt 



Washington bus trip 
is next Saturday 




Seats are still available for 
the Washington, D.C. bus trip 
next Saturday, April 19, accor- 
ding to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of Col- 
lege activities. 

"Tickets will be available 
until they are sold out," Mrs. 



Fremiotti said. 

Cost is S20 for students, 
faculty and staff, and S22 for 
the general public. 

Interested persons may 
pick up tickets in the College 
Activities Office, Room 108, 
Bardo Gymoasiuffl. 



The bus will leave the 
Learning Recources Center bus 
loop at 6 a.m. It will leave 
Washington at 9 p.m. 

"Food is allowed on the 
bus; alcoholic beverages are 
prohibited," Mrs. Fremiotti 
noted. 



Business Symposium attracts hundreds 

On Friday, there were to have been an estimated 800 students from 31 central Penn- 
sylvania high schools attending the I2th Annual Business Symposium at the College. 

The symposium is sponsored by the Business and Computer Technologies Division and 
Phi Beta Lambda (PBL). 

Its goal is to provide opportunity for students to compete for awards in business-related 
academic subjects. 

There were 22 separate categories of competition, according to Paul W. Goldfeder, assis- 
tant professor of business administration and PBL adviser. 

Chairpersons for the syposium were Goldfeder; Mrs. Ruby K. Hayes, assistant professor 
of business administration; John W. Miller, instructor of computer science, and Mrs. Doreen 
W. Shope, assistant professor of business administration. 

Special events and activities were planned and they included a fashion show presented by 
the College's retail merchandising students. The show, entitled "Tropical Paradise" featured 
students from various programs modeling apparel for business, weekend, vacation and prom 
wear. 

An awards presentation was to conclude the day's events. 



SME chapter 
to meet 
next Monday 



Chapter 49 of the Society 
of Manufacturing Engineers, 
Williamsport, will meet at 6:30 
p.m., next Monday, April 14, 
in the Sheraton Motor Inn, ac- 
cording to Lawrence H. Grac- 
zyk, publicity chairman. 



The speaker will be War- 
ren Price and his topic will be 
"Machining with Ceramic 
Tooling". 

Reservations and informa- 
tion are available by calling 
326-1473 between 10 a.m. and 
8 p.m. 



SPOTUGHTOMoida;, April 7, imoS 



Bluegrass 
Festival 
on April 22 

The Bluegrass Festival -- 
becoming a tradihonal event 
at the College - this year 
will be held at 7:30 p.m., 
Tuesday, April 22 in the 
Susquehanna Room. The 
festival is part of the Special 
Events schedule for the 
Spring, according to Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

The festival will feature 
groups such as 
Buckdancer's Choice, the 
Bluegrass Foure, the Four 
Flying Feet Cloggers, Dia- 
mond Back Rattlers, and 
the North Fork Alliance. 

Four Flying Feet Clog- 
gers is an Applachian clogg- 
ing team from Pittsburgh 
and is comprised of Nancy 
Dwyer and John Patrick. 
Diamondback Rat- 
tlers, a bluegrass band since 
late 1976, has performed in 
Ontario, Canada, and cur- 
rently is working on 
another album at the 
Revonah Studios in Liberty, 
N.Y. 

Please turn to Page 6 




AMONG THE GROUPS acheduled to ttke ptrt In (he Col- 
lege's Bloegnus Festivil Ihli month tre the North Fork 
AUiince. /Courtesy pholoj 



Invitation to W.A.C.C students 

Catholic Sunday Mass - 6:30 p.m. 

Neumann Chapel on Lycoming College Campus 

Worship Services open to all 

men and women of good will. 

.^k-,1^ COME PRAY mm US. 



Irifomalion ■ 3214065, 321.4111 or 321-4039 



6a8rOTUGHTOM»Uiy, April 7, Ifli 

Bluegrass Festival 
coming this month 

Continued from Page 5 

The Bluegrass Foure's 
instrumentarion is strictly 
accoustical with five string 
banjo, mandolin, guitar, 
and bass fiddle. 

Students, faculty, and 
staff with College ID wUl be 
admitted free. There is a $2 
general admission. There 
are no advance ticket sales. 
Additional information 
is available in the Recrea- 
tion Center Office, Room 
A137, Lifelong Education 
Center, or by calling Col- 
lege Ext. 763 or 327^763. 



CAMARO FOR SALE 

'67 Camaro, white, 
327, runs great. Classic 
plates. 322-6819, after 5 



STUDENT 
HOUSING 

Fornislied Rooms 

Singles, Doubles, 

Apartments available 

ALL UTILmES 
INCLUDED 

Showers and kitchen 
facilities 

$425.00 per semester 

957 Vine A?e. 

and 924 W. 3rd. St.. 

Both within one H) 

block of WACC 

Phone 326-6536 



Overdue books? You're forgiven!! 
It's National Library Week 

The College Library will be offering amnesty to students 
who return overdue books to the Library during this week, Na- 
tional Library Week (April 6 to 14), according to Mrs. iCate D. 
Hickey, director of the Learning Resources Center. 

Any student who brings back books which are overdue will 
not have to pay any fines, she said. 

Mrs. Hickey said she would also like to remind students to 
bring overdue books back so that a "hold" will not be placed 
on grades and records. 

Recommendations for banquet 
deadline is next Tuesday 

Recommendations and reservations for the Student 
Recognition Banquet will be accepted from faculty, staff, and 
advisers until next Tuesday, April 15, according to Joshua J. 
Burke, chairman of the Student Government Association's Stu- 
dent Recognition Banquet Committee. 

The banquet is to be held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 
23, in the Susquehanna Room. 

Forms may be taken to the Recreation Center Office, 
Room A137, Lifelong Education Center, or information may 
be submitted by telephoning College Ext. 763. 

The only way students are invited to the banquet is 
through the recommendations, said Burke, graphic arts student 
from York and SGA senator. 

The event is co-